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    By Kelvin Chan | Associated Press LONDON — Twitter took longer to review hateful content and removed less of it in 2022 compared with the previous year, according to European Union data released Thursday. The EU figures were published as part of an annual evaluation of online platforms’ compliance with the 27-nation bloc’s code of conduct on disinformation. Twitter wasn’t alone — most other tech companies signed up to the voluntary code also scored worse. But the figures could foreshadow trouble for Twitter in complying with the EU’s tough new online rules after owner Elon Musk fired many of the platform’s 7,500 full-time workers and an untold number of contractors responsible for content moderation and other crucial tasks. The EU report, carried out over six weeks in the spring, found Twitter assessed just over half of the notifications it received about illegal hate speech within 24 hours, down from 82% in 2021. In comparison, the amount of flagged material Facebook reviewed within 24 hours fell to 64%, Instagram slipped to 56.9% and YouTube dipped to 83.3%. TikTok came in at...
    I’VE never been a fan of Sir Gavin Williamson, so good riddance to him and his alleged bullying rubbish. He’s the kind of guy who reckons he’s a hard man and takes himself too seriously. 7Was Gavin Williamson being a bully or was this a one-off snapshot?Credit: PA He is what my stepfather would call a bit of a “twerp”. Besides, any man who keeps a tarantula in his office in the hope of striking fear into those who enter . . . has got to be a bit insecure, no? Or do my comments make me a bully? Wally Williamson’s alleged language to colleagues was — if it was as reported — unacceptable. And almost more sweary than the way I talk to my kids. READ MORE ULRIKA JONSSONULRIKA JONSSON How dare Stacey Solomon's Jackass ex ghost her - modern men have no mannersULRIKA JONSSON Meghan Markle ditched 'principles' & now sneers at women for doing the same Though I’d never tell them to “slit their throats”, as he allegedly did. That’s not even funny. Thankfully, I’ve not had the...
    A harassment charge, for example, can be upgraded to a hate crime if it was directed at a protected class of person (e.g., transsexuals) or if it can be shown that there were accompanying "hostile or prejudiced slurs, gestures, other symbols or graffiti at the time of offending." The Irish Department of Justice (IDOJ) admitted that this change is intended to rectify past difficulties establishing "motivation alone in proving hate crime offences." Critics have suggested that this would constitute a shift in the burden of proof from those levying accusations of hatred to those who were accused. According to Ireland's National Police and Security Service, a hate crime is any "criminal offence which is perceived by the victim or any other person to, in whole or in part, be motivated by hostility or prejudice." Perception, not intent, makes the crime. If a criminal offense has not been committed, someone can still be accused of a "hate incident," having done or said something legal that is perceived to be motivated by hostility or prejudice. The government claimed that the...
    Music and podcast streaming service Spotify recently announced the formation of a “Safety Advisory Council” to provide third-party input on issues including “hate speech”, disinformation, and extremism. The move comes after an ongoing backlash against the platform for not censoring Joe Rogan enough to satisfy leftists. CNBC reports that Spotify recently announced the formation of a “Safety Advisory Council” to provide guidance and input on issues such as “hate speech”, disinformation, and online abuse. The formation of the new group appears to be a reaction to the backlash the company received earlier this year over The Joe Rogan Experience podcast — which woke leftists claimed spread misinformation. Spotify CEO Daniel Ek ( Andrew Burton /Getty) (Photo by Douglas P. DeFelice/Getty Images) The new council consists of 18 progressives including representatives from Washington, DC civil rights group the Center for Democracy & Technology, the University of Gothenburg in Germany and the Institute for Technology and Society in Brazil. The council will advise Spotify on how best to deal with issues on its platform. Dustee Jenkins, Spotify’s global head of public affairs, commented: “The idea...
    Another Big Tech clampdown on free speech online appears to be forthcoming after the European Union agreed in principle more online censorship laws on Saturday. Members of the European Union have agreed on a new set of laws which will force Big Tech to take proactive action against “hate speech” and “disinformation online”. The new Digital Services Act now appears likely to result in even further clampdowns on free speech online, with sites with more than 45 million active users to be forced to more actively police content deemed to be either illegal or “harmful”, with “disinformation” also being a major target of the newly agreed legislation. According to a report by Euronews, all 27 EU member-states have agreed in principle to the new measures, which will see the likes of Amazon, Twitter, and Google fined for up to six per cent of their global revenue should they go against the act once implemented. “With the DSA we help create a safe and accountable online environment,” said one EU mandarin regarding the new measures, which look set to come into...
    BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union reached a landmark deal early Saturday to take aim at hate speech, disinformation and other harmful content online that would force big tech companies to police themselves harder, make it easier for users to flag problems and empower regulators to punish noncompliance with billions in fines. EU officials finally clinched the agreement in principle in the early hours of Saturday over the final details of the Digital Services Act, which will overhaul the digital rulebook for 27 countries and cement Europe’s reputation as the global leader in reining in the power of social media companies and other digital platforms, such as Facebook, Google and Amazon. “With the DSA, the time of big online platforms behaving like they are ‘too big to care’ is coming to an end,” said EU Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton. EU Commission Vice President Margrethe Vestager added that “with today’s agreement we ensure that platforms are held accountable for the risks their services can pose to society and citizens.” The act is the EU’s third significant law targeting...
    Hate speech is on the rise online according to an upcoming report from the Simon Wiesenthal Center, a global human rights organization.The center releases a digital terrorism and hate report each year."This is the marketing platform of the planet. This is where we shop and this is where our kids are targeted for both recruitment and demonization on social media," said Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean and director of global social action for the center.The group held news conferences in Springfield with state lawmakers and in Chicago with Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart discussing the report.RELATED: Anti-Semitic flyers targeting politicians distributed in Glenview"There is a dark side to social media. Social media spreads hate," said State Senator Laura Fine (D-17th District).And what happens online can have real-life consequences."I saw that happen a couple of weeks ago in my own district when my neighbors were left with packages on their driveways spewing hatred and antisemitism," Fine said.According to Chicago Police Department data, hate crimes rose 34% last year.It's unclear if social media played a factor in any of the incidents, but...
    Public school leaders in Frederick County, Maryland, have expressed disgust and outrage after threats were made against Black students on social media. “(Frederick County Public Schools) has no tolerance for discriminatory language and hate speech,” said Mike Markoe, the county’s interim superintendent. Sheriff’s deputies and school resource officers responded to Middletown Middle School on Wednesday morning after violent threats against Black students had been posted on Instagram and Snapchat. Images on those posts included racial slurs and what appeared to be firearms. In a tweet, FCPS said a social media post “containing hate speech and the threat of violence toward Black students” had been distributed. After a collaborative investigation, officials determined a social media post was distributed containing hate speech and the threat of violence toward Black students. FCPS has no tolerance for discriminatory language and hate speech. MORE DETAILS: https://t.co/OIfjMhkfyX — FCPS-MD (@FCPSMaryland) March 9, 2022 More Education News More Frederick County News More Maryland News Investigators said they identified the students involved, searched their bedrooms and determined that the firearms in the photos were fake....
    Legislation making its way through the Canadian Parliament would allow citizens to be taken to court and penalized if they are suspected of simply intending to post “hate speech” online. The proposed law encourages Canadians to report other Canadians to the authorities for intent to post hate speech online, and allows courts to punish Canadian citizens for things they haven’t done yet. Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers a press conference, on the second day of the G20 Leader’s Summit, in Buenos Aires, on December 01, 2018. – The Group of 20 major economies in a summit statement Saturday omitted past language on fighting protectionism, amid the hawkish trade stance of US President Donald Trump. (Photo by ALEJANDRO PAGNI / AFP) (Photo credit should read ALEJANDRO PAGNI/AFP/Getty Images) A truck with banners is seen parked in front of Parliament of Canada as demonstrators continue to protest the vaccine mandates implemented by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on February 10, 2022 in Ottawa, Canada. (Photo by Dave Chan / AFP via Getty Images) The law was noticed by Substack VP Lulu Cheng...
    A further tightening of criminal restrictions on online speech is being looked at by the UK’s Conservative Party government. UK Conservatives within government are looking at the possibility of further tightening restrictions on online speech, with officials looking at criminalising posts that are “likely to cause harm” as part of a new Online Harms Bill. The UK’s hate speech rules already in place have previously been accused of allowing “trolls” and “conmen” to weaponize the police, while the UK Home Secretary Priti Patel has promised to take measures protecting free speech. According to a report by The Telegraph, the Tory government is reportedly considering the possibility of expanding criminal restrictions on online speech to include any message or post where the sender either intended to harm someone, or was “aware of” the fact that it would harm someone. Under the expansion, proposed by the UK’s Law Commission, no proof would be required regarding whether someone was actually harmed by the post. Other changes being considered include making sending or posting “knowingly false communications” an offence, along with inciting, encouraging, or participating in what The...
    A Finnish MP who previously served as the country’s Interior Minister has gone on trial for hate speech over an online post that included a bible verse. Päivi Räsänen, an MP for Finland’s Christian Democrats party, has gone on trial in a court in Helsinki for hate speech against LGBT+ people. The nation’s former interior minister had made comments online criticising the Finnish Lutheran Church for associating itself with a pro-LGBT event, saying that the church was “elevating shame and sin to a point of pride”. According to a report by AFP, a tweet posted on social media by the ex-minister was accompanied by a picture of a bible verse that described homosexuality as “shameful” and “unnatural”. Prosecutors have now claimed that Räsänen should be prosecuted over her remarks, the MP’s criticisms being an “affront to the equality and dignity of homosexuals”. The BBC reports that the Helsinki court will now be forced to decide whether citing a bible verse can be considered a crime in some scenarios. Activist Loses ‘Gay Marriage’ Cake Discrimination Case Involving Christian Baker https://t.co/KZ5mGSQAK0 — Breitbart London (@BreitbartLondon)...
    The UK Home Secretary has announced that she will overrule the use of ‘Orwellian’ non-crime hate incidents by police, in a potential win for freedom of speech in the UK, if the minister follows through on her words. Home Secretary Priti Patel has said that she will overrule the recording of non-crime hate incidents by the police where a person’s freedom of speech is in question. The move comes after a court found that British police had acted unlawfully towards a former cop, calling the man up regarding a number of posts he made online to “check” his “thinking”. “The police will always have my backing to fully investigate hate crimes, but they must do so whilst protecting the fundamental right of freedom of expression,” Patel said according to a report by The Telegraph. “Some current practices are having a dangerous impact on free speech and potentially stopping people expressing their views.” The Home Secretary will now force police to abide by a new code of practice which will ensure that people will not come under criminal investigation should they speak...
    DENVER (CBS4) – Reports of anti-Semitism are on the rise in the U.S. with hateful comments appearing more frequently online. In Colorado, the number of cases has nearly tripled since 2018.  What happened to Dana Brown’s family is no less than appalling. The funeral for her mother Sally Gass was held at Babi Yar Park in Denver last July. The park is a memorial to many of those killed by Nazis in World War II. The event was held in person and online through Zoom. Dana Brown (credit CBS) “Somebody came onto the screen when people were watching my mother’s funeral and put onto the screen a lot of anti-Semitic words,” Brown recalled.  A person had barged online calling himself Adolph Eichmann, the World War II Nazi war criminal. “This was repeated on screen many times with swastikas and SS lightning bolts,” said Brown.  (credit CBS) The doors to many Jewish synagogues were closed due to the pandemic. Services moved online, but haters invaded the virtual sanctuaries and sacred ceremonies with horrifying displays of anti-Semitism including the the Nazi swastika...
    DENVER (CBS4) – Reports of anti-Semitism are on the rise in the U.S. with hateful comments appearing more frequently online. In Colorado, the number of cases has nearly tripled since 2018.  What happened to Dana Brown’s family is no less than appalling. The funeral for her mother Sally Gass was held at Babi Yar Park in Denver last July. The park is a memorial to many of those killed by Nazis in World War II. (credit CBS) The event was held in person and online through Zoom “Somebody came onto the screen when people were watching my mother’s funeral and put onto the screen a lot of anti-Semitic words,” Brown recalled.  A person barged online calling himself Adolph Eichmann, the World War II Nazi war criminal. “This was repeated on screen many times with swastikas and SS lightning bolts,” said Brown.  Dana Brown (credit CBS) The doors to Jewish Synagogues were closed due to the pandemic. Services moved online, but haters invaded the virtual sanctuaries and sacred ceremonies with horrifying displays of anti-Semitism including the the Nazi swastika symbol. Scott...
    SOCIAL media giants that fail to remove harmful posts will face BILLIONS in fines under tough new laws. Ministers will crack down on firms like Facebook and Google to make the UK "the safest place in the world to be online" - but have stopped short of threatening jail for offending bosses. 2Ministers will crack down on firms like Facebook and Google to make the UK "the safest place in the world to be online" Boris Johnson committed to pressing ahead with the Online Safety Bill in today's Queen's Speech. Her Majesty said: "My Government will lead the way in ensuring internet safety for all, especially for children, whilst harnessing the benefits of a free, open and secure internet." The Bill hands the watchdog Ofcom powers to fine Silicon Valley titans up to £18 million or 10 per cent of their turnover - whichever is more. Failing to take action against the most severe breaches such as pictures of child abuse, terrorism or suicide could result in firms being shut down. Other measures included in the Speech were:...
    MILAN (AP) — AC Milan became the first Serie A club to sign the “Manifesto of Non-Hostile Communication for Sport” on Tuesday, with the aim of combating racism and other hate speech online. There have been numerous incidents of players across Europe being targeted with racist abuse or other discriminatory comments on social media. The manifesto containing 10 principles for responsible online behavior was created by non-profit association Parole O_Stili in conjunction with more than 100 athletes, clubs, teams, federations, companies, journalists and spokespeople involved in the world of sport. “The Manifesto of Non-Hostile Communication for Sport is another important step on the club’s social responsibility journey,” Milan CEO Ivan Gazidis said after signing it in an online event. “We have decided to support this extremely worthy project to provide our global family of over 500 million Rossoneri with concrete guidelines aimed at creating an increasingly healthy and positive digital environment and banning intolerance and discrimination, in all its forms.” Among the other speakers at the event were players Davide Calabria and Deborah Salvatori Rinaldi as well as the club’s...
    Have you ever wanted to censor a little hate speech while playing a game, but not all of it? Thanks to Intel’s Bleep, a software that uses AI to censor voice chat, you can. Bleep was developed in partnership with a company called Spirit AI, and is currently in beta following a prototype developed two years ago. It uses AI to censor hate speech in real time during gameplay. The software “bleeps” out offending language (hence the name). The most recent iteration of the tech was shown off during an event highlighting Intel’s latest developments. During this presentation, Roger Chandler, vice president and general manager of client XPU products and solutions, positioned the company as “stewards” of PC gaming who feel some responsibility in moving the platform forward and “making gaming better.” Intel spoke to gamers about their needs, the spokesperson said, which included address what the company called “gaming’s dark side”: online toxicity. “Across the board, and across the globe, players raised concerns about witnessing and experiencing toxicity,” he said, before sharing some statistics on how often gamers...
    SAN JOSE (KPIX) — San Jose Police are investigating a hate crime against a San Jose Baptist church after suspects hacked into their online Easter services and unleashed a flurry of profane racist and homophobic comments. The incident happened on Sunday, April 4, during a Zoom livestream of Grace Baptist Church’s Easter services. READ MORE: Vaccine Passports Being Looked At For More Than Just Travel “What happened to us on Easter Sunday Morning was unconscionable,” said Reverend George Oliver. He had just opened the service for anyone online to ask for prayers when the intruders crashed in with loud music and a lengthy string of profanity and n-words. “Yo, what’s up my n—– monkey noises,” one of the hackers is heard saying on a recording of the incident. Parishioners tried to get the intruders to stop, but it only got worse with attacks on Jews and LGBTQ’s. “I am an out, gay, Black man. I was preaching in front of a rainbow banner, and that’s the day they chose to bombard this church with anti-Semitic rants; with homophobic and transphobic...
    Freedom of speech on the internet did not lead to a rise in “hate crimes,” according to a report sent from the U.S. Department of Commerce to Congress in January — a report that has yet to appear on any government website. Breitbart News has obtained a copy of the report, which is published in full below. But sources close to the government say they are baffled as to why it wasn’t released publicly after being sent to Congress. The report was prepared by the Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), which is responsible for advising the President on all matters related to telecommunication and the internet. It was drafted to revise the findings of a previous report from NTIA in 1993 titled The Role of Telecommunications in Hate Crimes. Although it was prepared under the Trump administration, the request to revise the report came from the 116th Congress, which was controlled by a 35-seat Democrat majority in the House and only a slim Republican majority in the Senate. The 1993 report is still publicly available on the web....
    (CNN)Given the state of global affairs, it is not a given that we -- a bipartisan group of elected officials from Israel, the US, Canada, Australia and the UK -- would find common ground in the midst of a global pandemic. However, the disconcerting proliferation of anti-Semitism through new technology demands that we take urgent action. We recently launched the Inter-Parliamentary Task Force to Combat Online Anti-Semitism in order to hold social media companies accountable for what takes place on their platforms and help create transparent policies to tackle hate speech. The hate that we see online isn't just harmless chatter relegated to dark corners of the internet -- it often spills onto the streets, and dangerous propaganda can quickly transcend the geographic borders of any of our countries. Combating this global hatred, therefore, requires a global solution. The launch of our task force follows grassroots initiatives, including the #NoSafeSpaceForJewHate campaign, and repeated calls to action after social media platforms have ignored or inadequately addressed virulent anti-Semitism on their platforms. Many TikTok users, for example, encounter anti-Semitic comments despite the...
    The European Union police agency coordinated raids against online hate speech that promote racism and xenophobia in seven countries in Europe, according to a report. German prosecutors said 96 suspects are being investigated for posts of hate, after cops searched 83 buildings to seize smartphones and laptops. CLICK HERE TO SEE FOX NEWS’ LIVE PROBABILITY DIALS One suspect is charged with making anti-Semitic comments online and another suspect is charged with insulting a politician online. VideoCLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE Germany, whose laws include prison sentences for Holocaust denial or inciting hatred against minorities, has strict internet laws. For example, social networks face big fines when they don’t delete or block criminal content. The countries involved were Italy, France, Greece, Norway, Britain and the Czech Republic. CLICK HERE TO INTERACT WITH FOX NEWS VOTER ANALYSISFrank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.
    Police in seven different countries across Europe conducted raids Tuesday on people suspected of engaging in “hate speech” online, according to reports.  83 apartments were searched in Germany to collect devices such as smart phones and laptops, Reuters reports. 96 suspects are being questioned by authorities about hateful posts they are accused of making online, per Reuters. (RELATED: Former Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn Suspended After Anti-Semitism Probe Finds Party Discriminated Against Jewish Members) One suspect is accused of insulting a female politician online and another allegedly made anti-Semitic comments, according to German prosecutors. The raids are an annual effort in Germany to crack down on hateful online posts, and this year they were accompanied by Italy, France, Greece, Norway, Britain, and the Czech Republic, all for the first time, per Reuters.  European police in coordinated raids against online hate speech https://t.co/oJagDmxvmR pic.twitter.com/1lcoqXlVmu — Reuters (@Reuters) November 3, 2020 The Tuesday raids were focused on combating racism and xenophobia, according to a Europol spokesperson. Germany is home to some of the strictest hate speech laws in the world, with things...
    BERLIN (Reuters) - European police launched coordinated raids in seven countries on Tuesday as part of a clampdown on online hatred and incitement to violence, the European Union law enforcement agency Europol and German prosecutors said. In Germany, police searched 83 apartments and other buildings to seize evidence like smart phones and laptops. Prosecutors said 96 suspects are being questioned about hateful posts they made online. One of the suspects is accused of making anti-Semitic comments while another insulted a female politician online, prosecutors in the German region of Rheinland Palatinate said in a statement. The raids are part of an annual drive initiated by German prosecutors, joined this year for the first time by Italy, France, Greece, Norway, Britain and the Czech Republic under the coordination of Europol. Tuesday's raids are focused on online posts that promote racism and xenophobia, a Europol spokesman said. Germany has some of the world’s toughest laws on defamation, incitement to commit crimes and threats of violence, with prison sentences for Holocaust denial or inciting hatred against minorities. A German law in force since...
    UK Royals Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are imploring Americans to vote in the upcoming election, and that while people claim every presidential election is “the most important” of their lifetime, this one actually is, adding that voters must reject “hate speech” and “misinformation.” British newspaper The Daily Telegraph — which is close to both Buckingham Palace and the UK’s Conservative government — reported Wesnesday that by getting involved in the U.S. election, the pair were risking a “diplomatic row”. It is British convention that Royals do not get involved with foreign election campaigns whatsoever. Hollywood actress Meghan Markle and her husband Prince Harry encouraged Americans to vote during an ABC broadcast special unveiling of the 2020 TIME 100, TIME’s list of the world’s 100 most influential people on Tuesday — National Voter Registration Day — according to TIME. “Every four years we are told the same thing, that this is the most important election of our lifetime,” said Markle. “But this one is. When we vote, our values are put into action and our voices are heard. Your voice is a...
    Prince Harry has urged US citizens to "reject hate speech" and vote in the country's upcoming presidential election. He made the remarks alongside his wife, Meghan, in a US television broadcast. A spokesperson for the couple said the comments did not refer to any specific political party or candidate, but were instead "a call for decency". Voting for the next US president, with candidates including Donald Trump and Democrat Joe Biden, is on 3 November. How is Donald Trump doing in the polls? Prince Harry repays cottage renovation cost No other option but to step back, says Harry The Duke and Duchess of Sussex appeared in a live video in what appeared to be their California home as part of the Time 100 - a list compiled by Time magazine to celebrate the world's most influential people. It was their first joint TV appearance since they ceased being working members of the Royal Family in March. "As we approach this November, it's vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity," the duke said...
    (CNN)The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have weighed in on the upcoming US presidential vote, urging people to reject online negativity and hate speech as what Meghan described as "the most important election of our lifetime" approaches.The couple, who now live in California, shared the remarks in a brief video message congratulating those who were named in this year's TIME 100 list of most influential people, aired in a virtual broadcast on ABC on Tuesday evening.Gloria Steinem revealed she teamed up with Meghan Markle to cold-call votersThey also honored the medical community and countless voices who are working to end injustice, according to representatives for the couple. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are alumni of TIME magazine's Time 100 list, having been named in 2018.Harry and Meghan called on viewers around the world to act with compassion in both the physical and digital worlds, use their voices, be engaged within their communities and the civic process, and care for one another, according to their representatives."When one person buys into negativity online, the effects are felt exponentially. It's time to...
    Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics, as they continue to define their new public roles after stepping down as senior royals. 'Every four years we are told the same thing, that this is the most important election of our lifetime. But this one is,' said Markle, 39, in the video clip broadcast as part of the Time 100, the magazine's annual list of the world's 100 most influential people. Markle continued: 'When we vote, our values are put into action and our voices are heard. Your voice is a reminder that you matter, because you do and you deserve to be heard.'  For his part, Harry said: 'As we approach this November, it's vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity.'  TIME Privacy Policy Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics For his part, Harry said:...
    A trio of Republican senators have proposed sweeping changes to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Those changes could greatly restrict platforms’ abilities to police hate speech and other dangerous content. Hide Section 230 insulates platforms from liability for content third parties post on their sites. It’s considered one of the bedrocks of the modern internet. Hide In recent years, some have argued for restricting that immunity. They believe that platforms’ free reign has encouraged complacency and led them to under-invest in moderating content such as child and revenge pornography, invasions of privacy, hate speech, etc. Republicans have lately twisted the Section 230 debate into one about political speech. Arguing that platforms silence conservatives, they’ve pushed to dismantle the legislation—a move that would certainly please the likes of deplatformed conservatives such as Alex Jones, Laura Loomer, and David Duke. To that end, three Republican senators have now proposed the Online Freedom and Viewpoint Diversity Act. Co-sponsored by Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), and Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), the act would broadly strip platforms’ liability immunity when policing content....
    Breitbart News technology reporter Allum Bokhari appeared on the Liz Callaway show on TALK 94.5 FM WTKN last week, to discuss revelations in his upcoming book, #DELETED: Big Tech’s Battle to Erase The Trump Movement and Steal The Election, which features interviews with insiders from Google, Facebook, and other companies. A source close to Google and other tech giants has said that the book, which lifts the lid on Big Tech’s four-year plot to undermine the Trump movement and influence the election, will “shake the foundations of Silicon Valley.” “The things I’ve heard from my sources inside Silicon Valley is quite terrifying,” said Bokhari. “Increasingly, with these hate speech algorithms, everything you post on social media will be scanned by an AI algorithm, sometimes before you even post it, and that’ll determine whether it appears at the top of people’s feeds or gets buried.” “A lot of conservative content is way more popular than left-wing content. It does very well unless there’s some artificial manipulation,” said Bokhari later in the interview. Callaway and Bokhari also recapped the Google Tape,...
    REDDIT on Monday banned its largest pro-Trump subreddit in a move to crack down on hate speech, but users who support the president have since migrated to another online community. Reddit CEO Steve Huffman announced that the message board site had banned more than 2,000 subreddits that were often guilty of breaking its community rules on harassment, hate speech and targeting specific groups. 3 A pro-Trump subreddit has gotten the boot from RedditCredit: AFP or licensors 3 A new pro-Trump website has popped up to replace the banned Reddit forumCredit: thedonald.win Subreddit r/The_Donald, which had more than 790,000 users, was one of the communities that got the boot. "All communities on Reddit must abide by our content policy in good faith," Huffman wrote in his announcement. "We banned r/The_Donald because it has not done so, despite every opportunity. "The community has consistently hosted and upvoted more rule-breaking content than average ... and its mods have refused to meet our most basic expectations." In a conversation with reporters, Huffman said that Reddit tried many steps to avoid outright banning The Donald...
    PARIS (Reuters) – France’s top court rejected most of a draft law that would have compelled social media giants such as Facebook (FB.O) and Twitter TWTRN.N to remove any hateful content within 24 hours, it said on Thursday. The ruling by the Constitutional Council, which said the law interferes excessively in free speech, is a setback for President Emmanuel Macron. He has vowed to make France a leader in containing the spread of illicit content and false information on the most used platforms. The bill was approved by France’s lower chamber last July but still had to be cleared by the Constitional Council. Under the draft law, social media groups would have faced fines up to 4% of their global revenues for failing to remove within a day “clearly illicit” content related to race, gender, religion, sexual orientation or disability. Several freedom of speech advocacy groups had argued the bill could pave the way for state censorship because it does not clearly define illicit content. “(These measures) undermine the exercise of freedom of expression and...
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