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    SAN JOSE — An airline with a high-tech approach to low-cost air service will offer new jetliner flights between Tokyo and San Jose starting this year, the air carrier said Wednesday. ZIPAIR said it will offer flights between Tokyo-Narita airport and San Jose International Airport starting in December. The airline offers automated services to enable passengers to check in a day before their flights and provides tech-bolstered services on the company’s airplanes. “ZIPAIR’s announcement reflects renewed global confidence in the strength of the San Jose market and the continued importance of Silicon Valley,” San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo said. Details of the new flights have yet to be fully sketched out. “With the convenient nonstop flight between Tokyo Narita and Northern California, we certainly look forward to welcoming more visitors to travel between the U.S. and Asia,” said Shingo Nishida, president of ZIPAIR Tokyo.
    Weddings are supposed to be a day of untainted love and joy. But not so for Japan's Princess Mako, who has today renounced her royal title after going against tradition to marry her university sweetheart.  The issue has arisen because her long-term boyfriend Kei Komuro, 30, a lawyer with a New York law firm whom she met at Tokyo's International Christian University almost a decade ago, is a commoner.  By marrying him today, Mako, 30, the eldest daughter of Crown Prince Fumihito and niece of reigning Emperor Naruhito, has chosen love over her title, duties as a royal, and official place within the family. Japan's strict laws of succession forbid women from ascending to the Chrysanthemum Throne and force them to give up their titles if they marry commoners.  The wedding has sent shockwaves through Japan - a country where the royal family face huge pressure to conform to tradition and meet exacting standards of behaviour, with each move intensely scrutinised.   It marks a dramatic, if slow burning, departure for the princess, a graduate of Leicester University who worked at Coventry Museums, who was...
    TOKYO -- About 100 of the 613 U.S. athletes descending on Tokyo for the Olympics are unvaccinated, the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee's medical chief said hours before Friday night's opening ceremony.Medical director Jonathan Finnoff said 567 of the American athletes had filled out their health histories as they prepared for the trip, and estimated 83% had replied they were vaccinated."Eighty-three percent is actually a substantial number and we're quite happy with it," Finnoff said.Nationally, 56.3% of Americans have received at least one dose of the vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.EMBED More News Videos COVID-19 cases are surging across the U.S., tripling in the past two weeks amid slowing vaccination rates. The IOC has estimated around 85% of residents of the Olympic Village are vaccinated; that's based that on what each country's Olympic committee reports but is not an independently verified number.The USOPC figure is more solid - based on questionnaires athletes were asked to fill out before they came to Japan. Finnoff said the committee is not differentiating its treatment of athletes based on...
    The Tokyo Olympics opened Friday under a cloud of uncertainty as the coronavirus pandemic still hangs over the entire world with some athletes contracting the illness even before the Games got underway. The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee (USOPC) said about 100 of the 613 U.S. athletes in Tokyo for the Olympics remain unvaccinated. USOPC medical director Dr. Jonathan Finnoff said 567 athletes have filled out their health histories and a resounding majority replied they were vaccinated. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM "Eighty-three percent is actually a substantial number and we're quite happy with it," Finnoff said. The International Olympic Committee estimated that about 85% of residents in the Olympic Village were vaccinated. The number is based on the reports from each country’s Olympic committee but is not an independently verified number. LIVE UPDATES: TOKYO OLYMPICS' OPENING CEREMONIES KICK OFF THE GAMES Finnoff said the U.S. wasn’t differentiating its treatment of athletes based on vaccination status. "The best thing to do is to assume everyone's at risk, and reduce risk by introducing COVID mitigation measures that we...
    Famous athletes in sports like tennis and golf heading to the Tokyo Olympics will probably arrive in Japan at the front of the plane. It’s a style to which the athletes of the Pacific Islands are unaccustomed. Fiji’s gold medal-winning men’s rugby sevens team will arrive in Tokyo along with the other members of their national team on Thursday on a cargo/freight flight which is hauling mostly frozen fish. Commercial passenger flights to and from Pacific nations have become scarce during the pandemic. Lorraine Mar, the chief executive of the Fiji Association of Sports and National Olympic Committee, said Wednesday that arranging travel for the Fiji team to Tokyo has been a "logistical challenge." Mar said around 51 athletes and officials, mostly the Fiji men’s and women’s sevens squad, will be on Thursday’s flight from Fiji's principal international airport at Nadi. It's a regularly-scheduled freight flight which has some capacity for passengers. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM The sevens teams recently have been based in Australia where the Fiji men won the Oceania Sevens title in Townsville,...
    OAKLAND — The pressure has increased on the Oakland Estuary for Olympic crews in the men’s eight and four boats heading to Japan next month. The rowers went to work Tuesday morning with the Tokyo Games a month away. Rowing kicks off the morning of the Opening Ceremony on July 23 at Sea Forest Waterway where Clayton’s Kara Kohler will start her weeklong quest to medal in the single sculls. The events culminate seven days later with the prestigious men’s and women’s eight finals. The U.S. men have been pulling oars at the National Training Center in Oakland since 2018 to prepare for the big stage in Tokyo. The men’s eight hope to return to the podium after finishing fourth at the Rio Games in 2016. The team’s lone holdover from Rio is Austin Hack, a Stanford graduate. The crew’s coxswain is Cal alumnus Julian Venonsky. But all of the Olympians have made the East Bay their home over the years in pursuit of earning a seat on the Olympic boat. Now the mission is...
    . and . La Jornada newspaperTuesday, February 9, 2021, p. a12 Tokyo Any decision about holding the Tokyo Olympics, postponed to this year due to the coronavirus pandemic, must be based on science, US President Joe Biden declared. The Japanese government and the International Olympic Committee have committed to holding them as scheduled, from July 23 to August 8, under strict conditions that could include no spectators. I have spoken with the Prime Minister of Japan, he is working very hard to be in a position to open the Games, and I think that has to be based on science, whether it is safe or not, said the president, mainly for the good of the athletes, who worked for four years and suddenly that opportunity is lost. While the directors and organizers promise that the fair will be fulfilled, Japanese health experts doubt it. If you look at things from a public health angle, organizing the Olympic Games is not the most desirable at this time, it would unleash a scandal linked to the virus. How to respond will be...
    South Africa halts AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine use after UK study; Pfizer touts Project Light Speed; 27M US cases. Latest COVID-19 updates. On impeachment, the stakes are high not only for Trump but also for almost everybody else Biden says decision on 2020 Games has to be based on science TOKYO (Reuters) - Any decision about holding the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games, postponed by a year due to the coronavirus pandemic, must be based on science, U.S. President Joe Biden told a radio show. © Reuters/KIM KYUNG-HOON A man wearing a protective face mask walks in front of a wall decoration featuring Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games mascot Miraitowa amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Tokyo The Games are set to start in under six months, and the Japanese government and International Olympic Committee (IOC) are vowing to hold them as planned, although under strict conditions that could include staging them without spectators. Biden, speaking on a Westwood One Sports radio programme broadcast on Sunday during halftime of the Super Bowl, said he hoped the Games would take place, mainly...
    A consulting company working for the Tokyo Olympic bid committee paid about $370,000 to the son of then-influential IOC member Lamine Diack before — and after — the Japanese capital was picked in 2013 to host the 2020 Games, news agency Kyodo reported on Monday. The payment is reported to be part of $2 million transferred by the bid committee to Black Tidings, a now shuttered consulting company based in Singapore. Tsunekazu Takeda, the president of the Japanese Olympic Committee at the time, acknowledged signing off on the $2 million payment. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM Takeda denied any wrongdoing, but the issue forced him to resign from his position in 2019 amid the looming investigation by French authorities. He also resigned from the International Olympic Committee. Kyodo said that in an interview with the news agency, Papa Massata Diack said the money he received was from a sponsorship deal in China and had nothing to do with Tokyo. The payments to Papa Massata Diack are new findings based on reporting by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and...
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