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    A SUNBED ban could be closer than ever, after the Government said it would consider the move.  There have been calls to rid them for years, with The Sun’s Fabulous campaign Dying For A Tan raising awareness about the dangers. 1A sunbed ban is more realistic than everCredit: AFP or licensors But it’s not until now that ministers are set to take on the debate.  Health minister James Morris on Tuesday agreed to discuss a ban on sunbeds after Labour MP Sarah Owen pressed the Government to take the “dangers of sunbeds seriously”. Ms Owen, MP for Luton North, said: “Sunbeds continue to be used all-year round at very high risk. “So does the minister agree it’s time we took the dangers of sunbeds seriously and does the minister support Melanoma UK’s campaign to ban the use of sunbeds – and if not, why not?” Read more on Dying For A TanSPOT CHECK Can you spot killer moles from the harmless ones?TAN-DRASTIC My obsession with sunbeds ruined my life, reveals Embarrassing Bodies guest Mr Morris replied: “Given the weather we’re...
    Indonesian Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati delivers a speech during the opening of the Group of 20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting in Nusa Dua, on the Indonesian resort island of Bali, on July 15, 2022.Made Nagi | AFP | Getty Images Senegalese Minister of Economy Amadou Hott has urged the global food industry not to boycott the trade of Russian and Ukrainian food products as the food crisis rages on in vulnerable countries. Hott said at the Group of 20 meeting of financial leaders in Bali last week that without immediate resolution, the crisis — which involves both a food shortage and high prices — would kill more people "than during Covid times." The war has seen many countries such as the U.S. and those in the European Union sanction the use or trade of Russian goods. But while staples like food and fertilizers are exempt from these sanctions, those in the food sector are preemptively avoiding these transactions to protect themselves, Hott added.   "We understand that food and fertilizers are exempt from sanctions. However, the...
    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves after making a statement at Downing Street in London, Britain, July 7, 2022. Peter Nicholls | Reuters LONDON — The race to replace outgoing U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is wide open. Johnson resigned as Conservative Party leader on Thursday, finally bowing to immense political pressure after an unprecedented flood of government resignations and a Cabinet revolt. "Them's the breaks," Johnson said as he addressed the British public outside Downing Street. He added that he was "sad to be giving up the best job in the world" and conceded that "no one is remotely indispensable" in politics. The 58-year-old former London mayor said he plans to stay on as caretaker prime minister while a successor is chosen, defying calls from across the political spectrum — including from some within his own party — to go immediately.VIDEO5:0105:01UK PM Boris Johnson announces resignation, will serve until new leader appointedSquawk BoxJohnson's critics have insisted he must be pushed out as soon as possible, with Deputy Prime Minister Dominic Raab to act as caretaker in the meantime. However, other...
    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson makes a statement at Downing Street in London, Britain, July 7, 2022. Peter Nicholls | Reuters After an acute political meltdown in the U.K., Prime Minister Boris Johnson has resigned as leader of the Conservative Party, setting in motion a race for a new prime minister. Johnson stood at a lectern outside No. 10 Downing Street at lunchtime Thursday and announced his resignation, stating that "no one in politics is remotely indispensable" and that he was "sad to be giving up the best job in the world." Crucially, Johnson said he would continue to serve as prime minister until a successor is chosen in a leadership contest set to take place over the coming weeks. But given Johnson's extraordinary fall from political grace, there is disquiet among some — both within his ruling Conservative Party and beyond — over the prospect of Johnson remaining in office for any time at all. Here's what could happen next in this fast-moving political drama:Leadership contestAmong those expressing concern over Johnson remaining caretaker prime minister until a new leader is...
    Australia has been warned Chinese military troops, ships and aircraft could arrive in the Solomon Islands within weeks. There are growing fears China will act swiftly to establish a military base less than 2,000km from Australian shores after its security pact with the South Pacific island nation was finalised on Tuesday.  Security experts expect Beijing to have 'boots on the ground' by the time Australians go to the polls next month. The Lowy Institute's senior ­fellow for East Asia, Richard McGregor expects Beijing to 'move as fast as it can' to establish a physical foothold before the federal election. He warned China's long term aim is to have a permanent military presence in the Pacific.  Solomon Islands have cemented ties with China with a new security pact finalised this week. Pictured are Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in 2019 'They would want to have boots on the ground and establish a concrete presence there – living quarters, possibly a small dock on the pretext of refuelling a supply ship,' Mr McGregor told The Australian. 'Once you have a...
    London (CNN)It's been said many times in the last three years, but this could be the worst day of Boris Johnson's political life. It is now a statement of fact that the Prime Minister broke the law. He is thought to be the first British PM in history to be punished for doing so while in office and -- were he to follow protocol -- he would now resign from his post. Downing Street has confirmed that Johnson has been fined by London's Metropolitan Police as part of their investigation into the so-called Partygate scandal. They said the fine was in relation to a gathering held on June 19, 2020, when Johnson's team held an impromptu gathering for his birthday at which he was presented with a cake. Under Covid restrictions in place at the time, indoor gatherings were not allowed, with people permitted only to meet outside in groups of up to six people.CNN affiliate ITV previously reported that two gatherings were held to celebrate Johnson's birthday on June 19: One -- attended by as many as 30 people...
    Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov on Friday hailed India as a friend that was not taking a 'one-sided view' on the Ukraine war, during a visit to New Delhi that critics said showed how the Biden administration was failing to unite the world against Moscow.  India is under intense pressure to back away from Vladimir Putin and stem its purchases of Russian oil, for fear it is undermining Western sanctions. This week, President Joe Biden's Deputy National Security Adviser Daleep Singh - one of the chief architects of sanctions against Russia - and British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss were in New Delhi with fresh pleas for help. They were followed by Lavrov who met with Prime Minister Narendra Modi - a nicety not afforded the other visitors.  Russia is the biggest supplier of defence equipment to India and Lavrov said the two countries would use a rupee- to-rouble mechanism to trade oil and military hardware.  That comes despite Singh delivering a warning to India that it would expose itself to 'great risk' if it increased its purchases of Indian oil, according to...
    Boris Johnson is considering a lightning trip to Kyiv to show support for Ukraine's battle against Vladimir Putin. The Prime Minister has asked officials to examine the practicality and value of the trip to the Ukrainian capital for talks with president Volodymyr Zelensky. Security officials are said to be 'having kittens' at the prospect of the PM travelling to a war zone. But a Whitehall source said Mr Johnson 'wants to go' if it can be made to work. The source added: 'If you set aside the security concerns, which are considerable, the question is whether there is anything additional you could achieve by visiting in person, or whether it would just be a show of solidarity, and whether that is a sufficient goal in itself.' Prime Minister Boris Johnson has asked officials to examine the practicality and value of a trip to Kyiv Ukrainian firefighters and security teams at the scene of a building hit by Russian missiles in Kyiv But the situation tonight in Kyiv showed how difficult it would be to ensure the Prime Minister’s safety if...
    Europe is heading for a Covid 'ceasefire' which could signal the end of the pandemic, the World Health Organization has announced.  The Europe director of the organisation Hans Kluge spoke of 'a ceasefire that could bring us enduring peace', with high vaccination rates, the milder Omicron variant and the end of winter in sight. 'This context leaves us with the possibility for a long period of tranquility,' he told reporters on Thursday.  This was 'not to say that (the pandemic) is now all over', but 'there is a singular opportunity to take control of the transmission', he added. 'Even with a more virulent variant (than Omicron) it is possible to respond to new variants that will inevitably emerge - without re-installing the kind of disruptive measures we needed before', Kluge said. The Europe director of the organisation Hans Kluge (pictured) spoke of 'a ceasefire that could bring us enduring peace', with high vaccination rates, the milder Omicron variant and the end of winter in sight He cautioned that the optimistic scenario required countries to pursue vaccination campaigns and surveillance to detect...
    John Major did not believe the IRA could be beaten militarily, he admitted privately while he was Prime Minister. He told the Irish Taoiseach Albert Reynolds it would be ‘very difficult’ and could prove impossible to defeat the IRA by force, a memo from their Downing Street meeting in February 1992 revealed yesterday. The Irish government note was part of a tranche of official documents related to the Northern Ireland peace process made public by the National Archives. John Major told Albert Reynolds that he was unsure if IRA could be militarily defeated and warned British were not suffering from battle fatigue, according to newly released documents from the National Archives. Irish Prime Minister Charles Haughey (left) with former British Prime Minister John Major (right) during a visit to Dublin for talks in 1991 The thousands of files included a British intelligence assessment that Colonel Gaddafi’s regime in Libya had sent arms and aid worth more than $12million to the IRA – the equivalent of £34million today. Another memo revealed the Government believed Sinn Fein president Gerry Adams was on the...
    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern could be forced to uninvite guests to her summer wedding to make sure she complies with New Zealand's Covid-19 rules. Under the strict rules, Ardern would be restricted to hosting 100 vaccinated guests at the ceremony, that's slated to be held in Gisborne.   Ardern admitted the possibility of having to cut back her guest list during an interview with The Hits radio station. 'It's that awkward situation; uninviting people is quite awkward,' Ardern said when asked how she would handle the situation if the scenario arose. 'I haven't actually quite figured out what we're going to do.' To make matters worse, Gisborne has one of the lowest rates of vaccination in New Zealand, which may further hinder the Prime Minister's wedding plans. NZ Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern  (pictured with her fiancé Clarke Gayford) may be forced to uninvite guests to her summer wedding under her own strict Covid rules Ms Ardern (pictured with Mr Gayford) could be restricted to hosting just 100 guests at her summer wedding slated to be held in Gisborne...
    Polish border guards thwarted two 'mass attempts' to cross the border overnight by rock-throwing migrants who tried to storm across a railway track from Belarus.  Video showed guards having laser pointed shone in their eyes and being pelted with stones by a group of around 50 migrants who tried to cross the border at Czeremcha overnight, 70 miles south of where the main camp is located. Dozens of smaller attempts were also made, with the Polish border service saying a total of 161 crossings were stopped with 34 migrants forcibly deported. The situation remained tense early Wednesday with thousands of migrants still camped close to the border at Kuznica - where violent clashes erupted Tuesday - even as others were march off to an unknown location.  It is thought they are being taken to temporary accommodation in warehouses nearby. Thousands more migrants were taken to similar shelters overnight.  Meanwhile Mariusz Blaszczak, the country's defence minister, warned the crisis is likely to continue for months and that Poland must remain vigilant. 'I hope it will not be years,' he added. Two large...
    More On: denmark Biden taps former Danish reality star for State Dept. role Danish bar offers COVID tests on tap Priest accused of killing wife after disturbing internet searches found on computer Health official faints while announcing halt of WHO-approved vaccine COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Several European nations want Denmark to explain why its foreign secret service allegedly helped the United States spy on European leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel, more than seven years ago. “We want the cards on the table,’ said Swedish Defense Minister Peter Hulqvist, adding it was “unacceptable to eavesdrop on allies.” Danish lawmaker Karsten Hoenge of the left-leaning Socialist People’s Party, which is supporting Denmark’s Social Democratic government, said Monday that he would quiz the Scandinavian country’s defense and justice ministers in parliament about the case. “The government must explain how come Denmark has been acting as a willing tool for a U.S. intelligence service, and what it will mean for cooperation with Denmark’s neighboring countries,” he said. The Danish broadcaster DR said Sunday that the Danish Defense Intelligence Service, known in Denmark by...
    Jerusalem (CNN)Benjamin Netanyahu's run as the longest-serving Israeli prime minister may be coming to an end. Naftali Bennett, leader of the small right-wing party Yamina, announced Sunday evening he is working toward a coalition agreement with Yair Lapid, leader of the centrist party Yesh Atid, to join a new government. It's a seismic event in Israeli politics, and if the coalition is sworn in, it would bring an end to Netanyahu's 12 years as prime minister. In a prime-time address Sunday, Bennett told Israelis he is joining the new government to prevent a fifth round of elections and "rescue the country from spin." Naftali Bennett, leader of Israel's Yamina party, delivers a political statement at the Knesset in Jerusalem on Sunday."After four elections and a further two months, it has been proven to all of us that there is simply no right-wing government possible that is headed by Netanyahu. It is either a fifth election or a unity government," Bennett said.Read MoreHe dismissed suggestions that the coalition, which would include a wide swath of parties, would be a left-wing government,...
    London (CNN)Boris Johnson is under fire over renovations to his apartment, after the British Prime Minister's former chief aide leveled accusations of "unethical, foolish, (and) possibly illegal" behavior against his old boss.The claims come amid questions over who initially paid for Johnson's apartment to be upgraded -- and they hit very close to home for the Prime Minister, directing public attention to both his former closest ally, Dominic Cummings, and his fiancée, Carrie Symonds.Johnson, the outspoken leader whose early handling of the coronavirus pandemic divided Britons, is no stranger to backlash from across the political aisle.But the latest episode marks the first time Cummings -- who left government late last year, months after a scandal over his movements damaged public trust in the UK's Covid-19 lockdown rules -- has leveled allegations, on the record, against Johnson's premiership. Where does Boris Johnson live?Read MoreCompared with the Executive Residence at the White House or the various presidential palaces dotted around the world's capital cities, the British Prime Minister's London living quarters are relatively humble.Leaders would traditionally live in a flat above Number...
    Australia may not open up its borders even after everyone in the country has been vaccinated against coronavirus in an attempt to sustain its 'Zero Covid' strategy, the country's health minister has revealed.  'Vaccination alone is no guarantee that you can open up,' Greg Hunt said on Tuesday. 'If the whole country were vaccinated, you couldn't just open the borders.'  The health minister cited a range of other relevant factors, including transmissibility and the longevity of vaccine protection - and some Australians commentators have speculated it could mean years of border controls.  Australia has recorded just 29,437 just coronavirus cases and 910 deaths since the pandemic started after closing its borders in March 2020 and imposing tough lockdown rules and a 'Zero Covid' strategy that aims to totally eliminate the virus.  A few cases of the virus have resulted in strict city-wide lockdowns in Australia including one that saw crowds banned from the Australian Open tennis tournament.   But after 13 months of the strict rules a growing number of Australians, including some 36,000 who live overseas, believe the government is turning the country into...
    In this article .STI SGD= VIDEO2:2602:26Covid pandemic upended Singapore's leadership succession plans, says expertStreet Signs AsiaSINGAPORE — Singapore's carefully planned leadership succession has been thrown into disarray. Political observers say it's now not clear who would become the Asian financial hub's next prime minister.   Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat shocked the nation late Thursday, when he announced that he will step aside as the designated successor to Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong. He said he turns 60 this year, and cited his age as an obstacle in steering the country in a post-pandemic world. Heng will relinquish his role as finance minister at the next cabinet reshuffle, which local media said is expected in two weeks' time. Still, he will remain as deputy prime minister and coordinating minister for economic policies.It does throw a spanner in the works in terms of Singapore's very carefully laid out succession plans, but I don't see that as a body blow to Singapore's political renewal.Eugene TanSingapore Management University"It does throw a spanner in the works in terms of Singapore's very carefully...
    VIDEO2:5002:50Astrazeneca's Covid vaccine is 'very important' for Japan, says ministerSquawk Box Asia Japan is working closely with the International Olympic Committee to prepare for the Games and despite concerns about Covid-19 cases flaring, there are no plans to postpone, said Japan's minister in charge of vaccinations. "Unless they decide otherwise, we just simply need to prepare for the Games, how to control the situation. I think it changes almost every day, so they need to be prepared for that. But I don't think they are thinking about postponing it," Taro Kono told CNBC's Martin Soong on Wednesday. The Olympic torch was taken off the public streets of Osaka on Wednesday as the prefecture declared a state of emergency after coronavirus cases reached record highs. "Yes, (the) situation in Osaka is especially worrying," said Kono, who is also minister of regulatory reform. A new virus variant similar to the one first discovered in the U.K. is "quickly spreading" in Osaka, he added. "We have identified a similar mutation in Tokyo, so we are worried (that) Tokyo may follow Osaka in a...
    NURSES could be in line for a bigger pay rise after a Cabinet minister today hinted at a U-turn on the 1% offer which has prompted fury and been branded a "slap in the face". Justice Secretary Robert Buckland said he wants to see NHS staff "recognised in a way that's appropriate" as pressure mounts on the Government to up its miserly proposal. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 3Justice Secretary Robert Buckland hinted at a U-turn on NHS payCredit: Rex Features Health bosses and union chiefs have lambasted the offer, which amounts to just £3.50 a week, with a recent poll also showing 72% of the public would back a more generous settlement. Amid a growing backlash Mr Buckland said the 1% plan was "the beginning of a process" that will end when recommendations on salary levels in the health service are issued in May. And he hinted that the Government will be prepared to accept those suggestions, which will come after negotiations between independent NHS pay review bodies, unions, and ministers. He said: "This...
    VULNERABLE Brits could die if teachers jump the coronavirus vaccine queue, cabinet minister Liz Truss warned today. The International Development secretary denied calls to give teachers the jab in a bid to reopen schools in weeks. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3Liz Truss said vulnerable Brits could die if teachers jump the coronavirus vaccine queue 3There are growing calls for teachers to be vaccinated in order to reopen schoolsCredit: PA:Press Association Speaking to Sky's Sophy Ridge, Ms Truss warned that giving teachers the jab ahead of the four priority groups for vaccination could put the vulnerable at risk. She said: "The issue is that for every person you vaccinate who isn't in the most vulnerable group, that's somebody in the most vulnerable group who isn't getting their vaccine and who is more likely to die in the next few weeks and months. "I just don't think that's right. That's the decision made by the independent committee that we are going to vaccinate first the over-70s and those in the most vulnerable group,...
    HUNGARY and Poland’s leaders are embroiled in a bitter row with the EU after vetoing its budget plans amid fears they could be forced to accept migrants. The two eastern European countries – known for their conservative politics – are accusing the EU of “blackmail” in its plans to make access to cash for post-Covid recovery dependant on what they say is “unequal treatment of states”. 3Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki and Hungarian leader Viktor Orban have vetoed the new EU budgetCredit: AP:Associated Press Hungary and Poland’s rift with the EU stems from a belief “woke” western Europe wants to use EU funds to foist a more liberal agenda on socially conservative governments. The countries have vetoed the EU’s €1.1 trillion 2021-2027 budget and a €750 billion pandemic recovery fund, over a clause that makes access to funding conditional on respecting the rule of law. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban said his rejection of the budget plans were linked to his continued opposition to mass immigration into the EU. There will be no obstacles to blackmail countries which oppose migrationViktor...
    Yoshihide Chuka is viewed by many political analysts As the front-runner to replace the announced Prime Minister Abe Last month He resigned due to complications related to colitis, an incurable inflammatory bowel disease, which he was able to manage for most of his tenure. The ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) will vote in his place on Monday. Japan is not a presidential system – the country’s president is elected by members of parliament, so the next LDF leader, whoever he is, should have an easy path to become prime minister. Former Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and former Defense Minister Shigeru Ishiba are also in the running. If Sukha is elected, it will mark the culmination of an incredible and impossible political career for the 71-year-old. The business of Suka and Abe has been tied together for almost a decade since he became prime minister in 2012. Abe became the nation’s longest-serving leader since the end of World War II. Suka was Abe’s full-time right-hand man, serving as prime minister’s cabinet secretary, akin to a combination of chief of staff and...
    (CNN)If Shinzo Abe was perhaps born to be Japan's prime minister, the path to political stardom for his potential successor was hardly guaranteed. Yoshihide Suga is seen by many political analysts as the front runner to replace Prime Minister Abe, who announced last month he was stepping down due to complications related to colitis, a non-curable inflammatory bowel disease that he was able to manage for most of his tenure. The ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) will vote on Monday to choose his replacement. Japan is not a presidential system -- the country's leader is chosen by parliamentarians, so the next LDP leader, whoever that is, should have an easy path to becoming prime minister. Former foreign minister Fumio Kishida and former defense minister Shigeru Ishiba are also running. If Suga is chosen, it will mark the pinnacle of an incredible and unlikely political career for the 72-year-old.Suga and Abe's careers have been tied for nearly a decade since the latter became prime minister in 2012. Abe went on to become the country's longest-serving leader since the end of World...
    (CNN)Rumors concerning Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's health had circulated for weeks, and while his resignation on Friday could not have come as a complete shock to United States officials, the timing of the announcement is worrisome. Paul Sracic Tensions in Asia have been on the rise. While the US and China trade war marches on, China has been taking increasingly provocative actions in the East China and South China Seas. Just a few days ago, for example, China fired four ballistic missiles into the South China Sea, where six different governments are engaged in a territorial dispute. China has also ratcheted up tensions with Japan by continuing to allow its ships to sail into the disputed waters near the Senkaku Islands administered by Tokyo (China, which calls them the Diaoyu Islands, also claims sovereignty). To top it off, China's crackdown on Hong Kong and its threats to Taiwan have sparked fears that a major conflict in Asia is inevitable in the coming years. Abe, who recently became Japan's longest-serving prime minister, was a source of stability in the...
    March on Washington, Jacob Blake shooting: 5 things to know Friday Cities with the highest organic food prices What the resignation of Japans Prime Minister Shinzo Abe could mean for markets Japan's longest-serving premier on Friday confirmed his intention to step down due to worsening health. Now, despite Abe's departure, analysts expect a continuation of the country's reflationary policies. The Abenomics policy of massive fiscal, monetary support and economic reforms "may not have achieved all of its aims, but it wasn't an unmitigated failure either, and Japan has made some important progress under his leadership," Robert Carnell, ING's regional head of research for Asia-Pacific, said in a research note on Friday. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to resign for health reasons CNBC See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next How you can save $1 million for retirement USA TODAY How much the most populous states pay mail carriers GOBankingRates Creepy ways your company can spy on you while you work from home Veuer ...
    NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — The Hungarian government is “very concerned” that the coronavirus pandemic will trigger more waves of migrants trying to reach Europe from poorer nations where the disease will have a greater impact, the country’s foreign minister said Friday. Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto said European Union leaders are obligated to help citizens who lost jobs due to the pandemic by stemming “labor-oriented migration” that is “definitely against the interests” of Europe. Szijjarto said he thinks the EU’s migration policies must be scrapped because they “can be understood as an invitation for those who consider coming to Europe illegally.” “We reject all attempts for legalizing illegal migration,” he said after talks with the foreign minister of Cyprus. “We consider migration as a dangerous phenomenon, from a security perspective. There’s a cultural risk, and now there is a health care risk as well.” Szijjarto said the EU must wage a strong battle against human traffickers and take action against non-governmental organizations that in his view “basically cooperate with these trafficking organizations.” Hungary will take a “very tough...
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