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    The birthplace of the “Free Speech Movement”—the University of California-Berkeley—is having a free speech problem. But this isn’t about “woke” students shutting down what they consider offensive expression; it’s about an overabundance of administrative caution—that could end up chilling legitimate political dissent. In September, the school’s chancellor called for faculty feedback on a draft report jointly composed by an academic senate-administration workgroup. The document suggests restricting department-wide statements that are “political” in nature—despite concluding “that it is not possible to distinguish between ‘political’ and other statements.” In order to uphold “civility” and minimize “reputational risk to the institution,” the report advises departments at Berkeley to issue such statements “sparingly” and, if they do so, to include a list of each individual endorser. That’s pretty vague, right? One would expect guidelines on “political” statements to more clearly lay out what makes a statement “political.” And what amount is “sparingly”? In a response published on Sept. 22, the Berkeley Faculty Association (BFA) criticized the workgroup for its muddled definition of what constitutes “political” expression—which diverges from UC policy’s historical interpretation of...
    U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspectors recently found that staff at the University of California, Berkeley’s lab have been severely neglecting captive macaque monkeys. The monkeys were so dehydrated when they arrived at the facility that the animals were no longer urinating and, in some cases, no longer eating. One of the monkeys had eyes that were sunken in from a severe level of dehydration. The majority of animal testing is used in medicine and for other human products and treatments. According to PETA, the National Institutes of Health wastes $12 billion annually on animal testing that leads nowhere, these experiments on animals fail 90% of the time! The research used on animals rarely correlates when it is tested on humans, making it a waste of money and unnecessary. Monkeys, mice, rats, and dogs are all used in animal experiments around the nation. It’s time countries ban animal experimentation altogether as it hurts humans as well. Source: VICE News/Youtube What’s worse about this horror story is it was not an accident. The staff at UC Berkeley knew that their...
    BERKELEY —  As a team of police officers in riot gear kept watch in the predawn darkness, UC Berkeley construction workers fenced off historic People’s Park early Wednesday, the first step of a plan to turn the symbol of 1960s counterculture into housing for students and the homeless. The university commenced the action in the middle of the night because redevelopment of the park, while supported by both the university and the city of Berkeley, has long been bitterly opposed by park proponents. They view the space just south of campus, long home to a community of unhoused people and the site of free meals for decades, as hallowed community ground. Indeed, shortly after 2 a.m. as construction machinery moved in, the Twitter account “Defend People’s Park” issued an urgent call to activists to head to the area. “WE NEED SUPPORT,” the tweet read. “PLEASE COME.” Activists also summoned park supporters to a rally for the park starting at 5 p.m. The situation was mostly calm Wednesday morning, but earlier UC Berkeley police arrested three individuals for allegedly...
    The University of California Board of Regents on Thursday asked for a public review of UCLA’s controversial Pac-12 exit for the Big Ten, including an assessment on how it will affect student-athletes and other UC campuses. The request came after Gov. Gavin Newsom demanded an explanation from UCLA on its planned move in August 2024 and attended a closed-door regents meeting in San Francisco on the issue Wednesday. He has expressed concern about what he viewed as a lack of transparency by UCLA, which informed UC President Michael V. Drake but did not consult with regents. Only a handful of UC officials were notified just before the decision was announced. UC Berkeley — the only UC campus that will be left behind in a weakened conference without UCLA and USC — will probably take a big financial hit. “The first duty of every public university is to the people — especially students,” Newsom said in a statement. “UCLA must clearly explain to the public how this deal will improve the experience for all its student-athletes, will honor its...
    BERKELEY (AP) — A University of California, Berkeley student has been charged with threatening to shoot university staff members in an incident last week that led to an hourslong campus-wide lockdown, court documents obtained Wednesday showed. Lamar Bursey, 39, was charged Monday with two counts of felony criminal threats after he allegedly sent an email to several university staff members saying that two of them would be shot if he didn’t get the help he needed, according to charging documents from the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office. READ MORE: Suspects Identified In Baby Brandon Kidnapping; Infant Found Inside Suspect's HomeBursey, a resident of Hayward, was placed on academic suspension on April 14, according to UC Berkeley police. Last Thursday, Bursey sent an email just before 6 a.m. to several university staff members telling them he had slept outside the previous night and that they were “his resources,” according to a declaration by UC Berkeley police filed in court. “I’ll be in the office from aprox 9am to 4pm today. Stop playing with me. Depending on who I feel was helping...
    SAN JOSE (BCN/CBS SF) — A new poll suggests strong public support for California’s ambitious high-speed rail project, but the challenges of stretching it to San Jose are daunting. UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies reported voters in California favor continuing the high-speed rail project by a five-to-three margin. The poll, which examined a range of issues voters want the state to address, was administered online to 8,676 California residents in English and Spanish. The findings are likely subject to a sampling error of approximately plus or minus 2 percent. READ MORE: COVID: Not All Bay Area Transit Agencies Lifting Masking Requirement, Causing Some ConfusionMark DiCamillo, director of UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies poll, told San Jose Spotlight it can’t easily be compared to past surveys about the popularity of the rail project. But he said the results show majority support for the truncated version of the project. “We’re now in 2022, it’s a long way away, and it’s been 14 years, but voters wanted to go forward even in its kind of abbreviated form,” DiCamillo said. In 2008,...
    BERKELEY (KPIX 5) – Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have launched a new project, hoping to find a cleaner way to heat and cool campus buildings. Most digging on the campus, like construction projects, might get down to 60, maybe 80 feet deep. READ MORE: Google To Use Driverless Autonomous Vehicles To Transport Employees Within San FranciscoEngineers are now going well past that, in hopes of creating what you might call a “natural heat pump.” “We are drilling 400 feet into the ground, really to test what is the capacity of the ground absorbing heat,” said UC Berkeley Civil Engineering Professor Kenichi Soga. At 400 feet deep, and about 8 inches wide, the borehole will give Soga and his team unprecedented access to the soil and rock beneath the campus. A team at UC Berkeley begins digging deep underground as part of a research project to cleanly heat and cool campus buildings, March 30, 2022. (CBS) READ MORE: Attorney: Man Shot By San Jose Police During Restaurant Brawl a Hero For Disarming GunmanDepending on what they...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- U.C. Berkeley started drilling a new borehole Wednesday as part of its plan for a sustainable future. The borehole goes around 400 feet underground and will be used to test the soil. Their goal is to use the ground as a way to store heat emitted by products like air conditioning."There is a heat difference like from an air conditioning," said Dr. Kenichi Soga, project manager and civil engineering professor. "We can store that excess heat and use it to heat our buildings in the winter."U.C. Berkeley has a plan to go all electric on the campus by the next decade. The way this specific project works is by drilling boreholes in the ground and creating heat storage chambers. Heat emitted will be stored below the surface and released into buildings to heat them. This would limit the use of furnaces and other products that consume energy.VIDEO: Berkeley Lab's climate-flexible smart roofs could help save energy year-round EMBED More News Videos Berkeley researchers hopes the roof cooling technology TARC can be developed for commercial use in...
    By Teresa Watanabe | Los Angeles Times California legislators are fast-tracking a rescue effort to help UC Berkeley avoid slashing its in-person fall class by more than 2,600 students to meet a court-ordered enrollment freeze, just as the university prepares to release admission decisions this month. Under legislation introduced Friday, the state’s public colleges and universities would be given 18 months to complete any court-ordered environmental review before being subject to a mandatory reduction or freeze in campus population. If passed by the Legislature and signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom, the legislation would take effect immediately and retroactively — allowing UC Berkeley to proceed with its original plans to enroll more than 5,000 first-year California students, according to state Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), who leads the Assembly Budget Committee and drove the legislation’s development. “To be able to get into the University of California at Berkeley is a huge accomplishment for any student, and the amount of time that they spend to achieve that is really a lifetime’s worth of work,” Ting said. “If we were able to find...
    BEREKELEY, Calif. -- The University of California, Berkeley was ordered by California's Supreme Court on Thursday to freeze its undergraduate enrollment at 2020-21 levels, meaning it will have to accept at least 3,000 fewer students than planned for the upcoming academic year.Thursday's decision is the result of a legal battle with a residents group called Save Berkeley Neighborhoods that sued the university for failing to address the effect of increased student enrollment on housing, homelessness, traffic, and noise. An Alameda County Superior Court in August sided with the Berkeley residents, suspending a proposed faculty housing and classroom construction project, and ordered the campus to limit enrollment to its 2020-2021 level of just over 42,000 students.The school sent letters to applicants saying it would need to cut undergraduate enrollment by at least 3,000 students, sending prospective students and their families into a panic.An appeals court last month denied UC's request to lift the enrollment freeze as the case continues. The decision prompted Gov. Gavin Newsom to file a friend of the court brief asking the California Supreme Court to...
    A bill introduced Tuesday — in the wake of a potential student enrollment crisis at UC Berkeley — would exempt public universities’ housing developments from California’s arduous environmental review process. Introduced by state Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), the bill comes as UC Berkeley sent thousands of applicants letters last week saying the university may have to cut enrollment by about 3,050 seats if a court order is upheld. A Berkeley neighborhood group successfully sued UC Berkeley saying the university did not adequately address environmental issues related to increasing student enrollment. An Alameda Superior Court judge agreed and ordered an enrollment cap. The university has petitioned the California Supreme Court to stay the lower court ruling while the case is being appealed. Wiener’s bill would exempt University of California, California State University and California Community Colleges from the state’s premier environmental law, the California Environmental Quality Act, when pursuing housing projects. Campuses must, however, pay prevailing wages and employ a skilled and trained workforce. Housing can’t be built on farmland, wetlands or a high fire hazard severity zone. The...
    Max Schlosberg looks like any other UC Berkeley student as he saunters through patina-coated Sather Gate, blending into crowds of masks and backpacks in his Converse shoes, gray university hoodie and shoulder-length locks. After growing up in the city and going to Berkeley High School less than four blocks west of the very campus where his parents met as students, the 17-year-old feels right at home. He’s crossing his fingers that he’ll be walking through the university’s storied grounds for years to come as a student. “Knowing it’s one of the most highly regarded institutions in higher education in the U.S., I’ve sort of faced the fact that a lot of people want to come to Berkeley,” said Schlosberg, who has to wait six more weeks to learn whether he’ll officially become a California Golden Bear. “When I applied, I already knew the chances of success of any one person getting in is very low,” he said. UC Berkeley, after all, gets about 150,000 applications a year. BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA – FEBRUARY 16: Max Schlosberg, 17, and his dad Mark Schlosberg,...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- UC Berkeley tops the list of the world's best public universities- so it's a coveted place to enroll. But next month Cal may be sending out 5,000 fewer acceptance letters than expected due a court ruling in a lawsuit filed by a community group that says there's just not enough housing to go around.A court ordered enrollment freeze means UC Berkeley may be mailing out 5,000 fewer acceptance letters than anticipated next month for the 2022/23 school year.Cal Spokesperson Dan Mogulof said "We're now faced with the possibility we have to enroll 3,000 fewer students than we planned to. That's 3,000 students who have worked so hard to get into Berkeley. " A group called Save Berkeley's Neighborhoods is behind a lawsuit to cap enrollment.President Phil Bokovoy said "The University since 2005 has added 14,000 students and only 1,600 beds and we have a tremendous housing crisis in Berkeley. "Last year an Alameda County Superior Court ruling mandated Cal freeze enrollment at 2020 levels and Cal's appeal to a higher court was turned down...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- UC Berkeley is set to begin their next semester on January 18 with in-person classes. They are the only UC school that has not announced a plan to begin undergraduate spring classes with virtual instruction.Some students are now expressing concern.RELATED: California State University to require COVID-19 booster shots for spring semester"We already have an issue with close quarters in classes," said James Weichert, the student Vice President for student affairs. "Cases are rising, and I am seeing the other schools act on this but not us."The university announced back in December it will continue with it's in-person plan.ABC7 News reached out to school officials Thursday, and they said they continue to monitor the situation, and are not ruling out the possibility of changing it's learning plan. UC Berkeley does have numerous testing and vaccination requirements in place for students and staff.VIDEO: SJSU finally able to celebrate Class of 2020, 2021 with in-person graduation ceremoniesEMBED More News Videos Back on campus and in person for the first time since COVID, graduation ceremonies held at the SJSU honored...
    The new vice chancellor of “Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Belonging, and Injustice” (DEIBJ) at University of California (UC) Berkeley earns a salary of $325,000 to perform duties such as “battling injustices, systemic oppression, racism, sexism – all those things,” she said recently. In an interview at theSkimm in late September, Dania Matos discussed her new role, explaining she prefers not to “think of it as a career,” but, rather, as “who I am and how I show up”: My identity is Latina, first born, raised by a single mom. Those all shape the way I explore and see the world, how I shape it, and how it intersects when I’m in community with others. Meet UC Berkeleys new Vice Chancellor of Equity & Inclusion. "[Her] identity is Latina, first born, raised by a single mom," and she deals with the "emotional toll" of doing DEI-BJ work and "dismantling systems of oppression" through "mindfulness breathing." Salary: $325,000. pic.twitter.com/ucSAnyPFAC — Christopher F. Rufo ⚔️ (@realchrisrufo) December 13, 2021 Matos said her undergraduate degree in international relations from Brown University and then her law...
    Two Bay Area students — one from Stanford University and another from the University of California, Berkeley — are among the 32 chosen as Rhodes Scholars for 2022, receiving the prestigious postgraduate award to continue their studies at England’s Oxford University. “For the second year, a class of Rhodes Scholars has been elected entirely virtually, with both candidates and selectors participating remotely, safely, and independently,” Elliot Gerson, American Secretary of the Rhodes Trust, said in a Saturday news release. “As successful as the process was, we of course hope to return to in-person interviews and selection next year in cities across the country, as had been done for over a century.” Stanford senior Sayeh Kohani and recent UC Berkeley graduate Varsha Sarveshwar are among the cohort of 32 recipients, which includes a record number of 22 women, the most elected in a year ever. This year, more than 2,300 students underwent the application process and the winners represent 24 different colleges and universities. Selection committees from 16 regions interviewed finalists before two students from each region was picked. The Rhodes Scholars...
    BERKELEY — Half a century after the University of California’s proposal to build student dorms on a dirt lot triggered a history-making revolt, the university’s regents this week approved a student housing plan for the land now known worldwide as People’s Park. The UC Board of Regents on Thursday approved spending $312 million to construct a 12-story and a six-story building to house 1,100 university students and 125 homeless people on 1.1 acres of the 2.8-acre park. The other 1.7 acres would remain open space in honor of People’s Park’s colorful and occasionally tumultuous history. A memo detailing the plan states construction is slated to begin in summer 2022 and that students could be living there by fall 2024. But the project still faces a handful of legal challenges from labor and community groups that could delay it, as well as the remnants of a resistance movement that promises to protest every step of the way. Community groups Make UC A Good Neighbor and People’s Park Historic District Advocacy Group sued the university in August, arguing that its “long range...
    The University of California is seeking to add 20,000 seats for students by 2030, the equivalent of a new campus, to help meet surging demand for a UC education and college graduates to fill the state’s growing need for highly skilled employees. UC Board of Regents Chair Cecilia Estolano, who has marked enrollment expansion as one of her top priorities, emphasized, along with UC President Michael V. Drake, that UC must grow without sacrificing its renowned quality in teaching and research and increase numbers of both undergraduates and graduate students, faculty and staff. The system’s nine undergraduate campuses face a looming capacity crisis that could deprive as many as 144,000 qualified California students a seat at a four-year campus by the end of the decade. “The demand for, and the value of a UC education has only grown over the years,” Drake said. “Record-breaking application numbers speak for themselves, as do the stories we’ve all heard over the years about the challenges students face in achieving acceptance to the university’s campuses. It’s clear that enrollment growth is essential...
    UC Berkeley and two of its popular University of California sister campuses would admit more in-state residents and the overall UC system would add 6,230 more freshmen for 2022 in a proposed state budget bill legislators are scheduled to vote on Monday evening. Berkeley, UCLA and UC San Diego would make spots available for Californians at the expense of out-of-state and international students in a move Assemblyman Phil Ting, D-San Francisco, called the best higher education budget in decades. “This is a huge investment for future generations where we really focused on inequity and access,” he said Sunday. “We wanted to make sure more California kids could get access into UC and CSU (California State University).” The higher education component of the $262.6-billion state budget would greatly expand Cal Grants and middle-class scholarships for college students and also would launch a five-year plan to reduce non-resident enrollment at Berkeley, San Diego and UCLA to 18%. The proposed legislation provides enough funding to make up for the loss of nonresident tuition  — $1.3 billion annually from out-of-state tuition, according to officials....
    For the first time in its 158-year history, a scientist has been expelled from the National Academy of Sciences for violating its Code of Conduct. Geoff Marcy, one of the nation's leading astronomers, was removed from his position in the prestigious scientific organization on Monday, six years after his history of sexually harassing students was first made public. Members of the group had been petitioning for years to change the academy's bylaws, and in 2019, they voted to allow membership to be rescinded if it was found that a member violated the groups' Code of Conduct, which bans 'discrimination, harassment and bullying,' as well as plagiarism and data manipulation. Geoff Marcy was ousted from the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, six years after he was accused of sexually assaulting students at UC Berkeley and San Francisco State University The National Academy of Sciences changed its bylaws in 2019 to allow for the removal of anyone who violates its Code of Conduct, which prohibits harassment and bullying Marcy, once a contender for the Nobel Prize, was admitted to...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Saturday is hatching day for Cal Berkeley's Peregrine falcon parents, "Annie" and "Grinnell," according to the university's website.Last month, the proud Peregrine falcon mother laid four new eggs to her nest atop the university's Campanile.This is the falcon parents' fifth breeding season on campus.You can watch the livestream on UC Berkeley's Peregrine Falcon Nest Cam.RELATED: UC Berkeley's Peregrine falcon parents lay 3 new eggs Save the date! Sat, 4/18, for #HatchDay! The chicks of the campanile peregrine falcon parents Annie & Grinnell should start emerging from the 4 eggs that arrived in March! #Livestream ???????????????? https://t.co/YLcQ5eDYlj— UC Berkeley (@UCBerkeley) April 16, 2021Peregrine falcons are the fastest animal on the planet. They are able to reach top speeds of more than 200 miles per hour while diving for prey.Up until recently, they were considered an endangered species.RELATED: Welcome to the world: Peregrine falcon eggs hatch at UC Berkeley campus in East BayThe cameras were installed back in 2019 after a crowdfunding effort raised nearly $15,000.
    A California student has been missing since she vanished six months ago near the Golden Gate Bridge — and now her family is making renewed calls to bring her home. Sydney West, a 19-year-old UC Berkeley student, was last seen when she took a ride-share service to the bridge in the early-morning hours of Sept. 30, SFGate reported. “We are asking anyone who has any information about our daughter Sydney to please contact the investigators,” her parents, Jay and Kimberly West, said in a statement to news station KNTV. “We are anxious to have our daughter found safe and brought home.” West, who is originally from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, had been living with friends in the Bay Area to take summer classes. She had intended to enroll in classes in the fall, but had deferred after suffering a concussion, SFGate reported. Sydney WestFind Sydney West Facebook When she didn’t call the day after she was last seen, her father became worried, the outlet reported. “As 6 months passes where we have not seen or heard from Sydney, it becomes increasingly painful,” her...
    BERKELEY (BCN) — Five students at the University of California at Berkeley have come up with a plan to relocate the Kansas City Royals baseball team to downtown Kansas City to create a sprawling incubator to foster local job growth, and increase affordable housing for lower-income neighborhoods. The students were just selected as finalists in the Urban Land Institute’s Hines Competition, which challenges college students to tackle complex issues facing U.S. cities. READ MORE: Stimulus Check Update: When Could Another Economic Relief Payment Arrive? “Just as the beloved .42 Jackie Robinson of the KC Monarchs blazed a new trail for integration of Black athletes in baseball, the time has come to integrate these overlooked communities of KC and galvanize economic development in the blighted East Village neighborhood,” the students wrote in their proposal. The students’ $1.4 billion plan calls for relocating the baseball stadium to downtown Kansas City and establishing a 150,000-square-foot mixed use, mixed-income development. READ MORE: UPDATE: San Francisco Moves To COVID-19 Red Tier; Indoor Dining To Resume At 25% Capacity “The relocation of the KC Royals baseball...
    BERKELEY, Calif. -- A surge of COVID-19 cases at UC Berkeley has prompted school officials to extend a lockdown on about 2,000 students living in residence halls.Katarina Pantovic is on the Cal volleyball team and was headed to her morning workout Thursday. She is one of the many students impacted by the current self-sequester mandate."About a week ago, they brought out an announcement that we have to all sequester because of the surge of COVID-19 cases in dorms," explains Pantovic.RELATED: Santa Clara University threatens suspensions, fines after massive fraternity partyOver the past few weeks, the university has experienced a surge in confirmed COVID-19 cases. As a result, an email was sent to students living in dorms telling them to quarantine.Students are required to stay in their rooms at all times with the exception of seeking medical care, using the bathroom or picking up food from dining kiosks, according the email sent to students.Among the strict new rules are a ban on outdoor exercise that goes beyond the state's own guidelines that encouraged getting outside to exercise.Students may also leave their...
    BERKELEY – A pair of UC Berkeley students has tested positive for a more contagious strain of the coronavirus first found in the United Kingdom, the university announced Thursday. The cases were among half a dozen new or suspected cases of the variant, called B.1.1.7., reported by Alameda County earlier this week, the university said in a news release. The university said the strain appears to be 50 percent more infectious than earlier variants. However, the strain is not known to be more deadly or cause more severe disease. More than 540 cases of the variant have been found in 33 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but these are the first cases to be identified in the Bay Area. The first U.S. case was announced on Dec. 29, but the earliest known cases stretch back as far as mid-December, CNN reported. The World Health Organization said the strain has also been found in at least 80 countries and territories. Testing company Helix told CNN the variant is on the rise in the United States and...
    BERKELEY — A fourth building on the UC Berkeley campus was stripped of its name this week, this time because of the writings and treatment of Native Americans by the hall’s namesake. Kroeber Hall lost its name Tuesday. The building was named after Alfred Louis Kroeber, known as the founder of anthropology in the west. One of the main reasons for the name removal was his views and writings that were a symbol that “evoked exclusion and erasure” of Native Americans, according to the university. UC Berkeley’s Building Name Review Committee recommended the removal of the name in October to Chancellor Carol Christ; Christ supported the change and received approval from UC President Michael Drake. The committee said that Kroeber, born in 1876, collected the remains of Native American ancestors from gravesites, and had them stored for research. The practice, labeled “salvage anthropology,” is now illegal, although it was not at the time of his collection, wrote the committee. Still, it was considered “immoral and unethical” at the time, the committee said. Lettering removed by a campus workman from the...
    BERKELEY — After months of speculation, UC Berkeley confirmed it will tear down a 111-year-old rent-controlled apartment building to make way for a larger new student housing project. But the university maintains that the current five tenants won’t have to vacate 1921 Walnut St. during the pandemic, and their relocation packages “could easily reach six figures.” “The university is ready and able to be flexible and accommodating, We can and will balance the needs of thousands of students who require housing, and the needs of these five tenants,” said Dan Mogulof, UC Berkeley’s assistant vice chancellor of communications and public affairs in an email. Tenants were sent a letter Tuesday night by UC Berkeley, informing them of the decision to include 1921 Walnut St. in its plans. The site is part of the larger “Anchor House Project,” formerly known as the “Gateway Student Housing Project,” which could add 760 plus apartment-style student housing beds to the campus. Construction is expected to begin at the end of 2021, with an estimated opening in 2024. “While we need to move as quickly...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) – The family of a UC Berkeley freshman who disappeared last September has offered a $10,000 reward for information in connection with the case. Sydney Kaitlyn West, 19, was last seen near the Golden Gate Bridge around 6:45 a.m. on September 30, 2020. According to her family, a private investigator has followed up on dozens of tips, but none have led to West’s whereabouts. Camera footage has been reviewed and interviews have been conducted among West’s friends and acquaintances, but there are no leads. Sydney West (San Francisco Police Dept.) “We know that there was a lot of pedestrian, car and bicycle traffic on the Golden Gate Bridge the morning Sydney disappeared.  Someone may have seen something — any piece of information could help lead us to Sydney,” parents Kimberly and Jay West said in a joint statement. Sydney West is from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, but also grew up in the Pleasanton area. She is described as standing 5’10”, weighing about 130 pounds, with light brown hair and blue eyes and possibly wearing glasses. West...
    Loading the player... UC Berkeley’s African American Studies Department has received a $2.8 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to expand its community impact. “Black Studies Collaboratory,” a three-year project that is overseen by the department, is set to expand Black studies outside of the classroom to educate the community and general public led by professors Leigh Raiford and Tianna S. Paschel. According to Berkeley News, the project will consist of of academic think tanks, summer labs for graduate students, and award research grants for African American faculty and students. Read More: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar promotes vaccinations: ‘Let’s do this together’ The projects aims to explore topics including prison abolition and global Black feminism that will ultimately translate into a course that’ll be open to the public in spring 2023. Ula Taylor, UC Berkeley professor and H. Michael and Jeanne Williams Chair of African American Studies, said the vision of the department was to expand outside of the classrooms in order to educate people on the nuances of the Black experience. The U.C....
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The U.S. saw an unprecedented, violent assault on its Capitol last week, and according to a UC Berkeley professor and chair of the university's Center for Right-Wing Studies, the events of Jan. 6 were not surprising."The markers were not sudden at all," said Dr. Lawrence Rosenthal.RELATED: FBI warned of violent 'war' at Capitol in internal report issued day before deadly riot: ReportRosethal joined ABC7's Kristen Sze on "Getting Answers" Thursday afternoon to discuss the markers of the right-wing, Donald Trump supports who stormed Washington, D.C. and also how the movement that inspired the attack compare to members of the Confederacy during the Civil War.Following the election of Joe Biden, Donald Trump encouraged his supporters with phrases like "Stop the Steal" and urged them to visit Washington, D.C., Rosenthal said."Online people talked about creating caravans to come to Washington," he said. "There's no way in which it was a surprise."He said the people involved in the storming of Capitol have a violent past."They have a long history of playing at the edge of violent and militia-like behavior,"...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- U.C. Berkeley is alerting students to be mindful of the state's stay-at-home order, yet it is contradictory as to how to adjust accordingly.They include the state's advice to avoid traveling over the holidays, but the university is also telling them they can't stay in the dorms.RELATED: California State University extends fall 2021 application deadline to Dec. 15The dorms will be closed starting Dec. 20 and the University expects students to leave.The memo that went out does not offer a solution, except to say students should contact Cal Housing immediately if they don't have a place to stay.If you have a question or comment about the coronavirus pandemic, submit yours via the form below or here.Get the latest news, information and videos about the novel coronavirus pandemic hereRELATED STORIES & VIDEOS: Map: CA counties that can, can't reopen under new rules COVID-19 risk calculator: The safest and most dangerous things to do this holiday season Want to get a COVID-19 test in time for the holidays? Here's what you need to know Updated number of COVID-19...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — University of California-Berkeley police are searching for four people suspected of carjacking a victim at gunpoint Sunday night in a university-owned parking garage. UC Berkeley police said that at about 9:30 p.m. Sunday, a person on level P1 of the Underhill parking structure at College Avenue and Channing Way was approached by four suspects — two armed with handguns — who took his gray 2018 Ford Fusion, as well as some other personal property. The suspects were last seen headed west on Channing, in both the gray Fusion and in an older white Honda sedan. Police did not release any description information on the carjackers. The victim was not injured, police said. Anyone with information about this carjacking is asked to contact UC Berkeley police at (510) 642-6760.
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — U-Berkeley campus police asked for the public’s help Saturday in locating a couple reported missing since they went on a hike on Thanksgiving. Fernando Torales-Acosta and Boyue Shen told family they planned to go on a hike on Thursday and would call when they returned. They have not been heard from since, according to a post on social media by UC Berkeley police. UC Berkeley PD received a report of a missing couple, Fernando Torales-Acosta and Boyue Shen. They told family they planned to go on a hike on Thursday 11/26/20 and would call when they returned. They have not called and have not https://t.co/oERcznoK9f pic.twitter.com/omfO11dRhV — UC Police, Berkeley (@UCPD_Cal) November 28, 2020 Torales-Acosta is listed as a graduate student in the UC Berkeley physics department. The couple’s car is a green Toyota RAV4 with license plate 7ZRU960. Anyone with information is asked to call (510) 642-6760.
    DAVIS (CBS13) – UC Davis has apologized to a fraternity it accused of holding a potential COVID-19 superspreader event. Last week, the school said it had launched an investigation into Theta Chi fraternity, alleging it threw a party after one of its members tested positive. Investigators were not able to find evidence to back up those claims. Chancellor Gary May apologized for causing “discomfort and embarrassment” to the fraternity. Earlier this year, University of California, Berkeley reported a spike in students testing positive for the COVID-19 and is attributing the increase in cases to a series of fraternity and sorority parties. UC Berkeley University Health Services Medical Director Anna Harte and Assistant Vice Chancellor Guy Nicolette revealed the sharp rise in coronavirus cases in a statement published on the UC Berkeley website.
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The COVID-19 pandemic is having a major impact across the world and also in cities across Northern California. The latest number of confirmed cases in the U.S. can be found at the CDC's 2019 Novel Coronavirus in the U.S. page. (The CDC updates the webpage on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.)Join anchor Kristen Sze for ABC7's daily interactive newscast about the novel coronavirus outbreak in the Bay Area and other hot topics. You can check here to stream the show Monday-Friday at 3 p.m. GET HELP: Resources and information about COVID-19 CA REOPENING TIERS: Map shows which counties can, can't reopen under Newsom's new 4-tier system COVID-19 RISK CALCULATOR: Quiz yourself on the safest, most dangerous things you can do as CA reopens LIFE AFTER COVID-19: Here's what restaurants, gyms, schools, sports will look like when they reopen LATEST LOCAL CASES: Updated number of COVID-19 cases, deaths in San Francisco Bay Area Here are the latest developments on the respiratory illness in the U.S.: Nov. 5, 2020UC Berkeley football player tests positive for COVID-19UC Berkeley's...
    What’s the latest poop on coronavirus outbreaks? Scientists at the University of California at Berkeley may be able to tell you. The scientists have been gathering samples of human waste from sewers in the San Francisco Bay Area to determine “hotspot” areas where the coronavirus is most prevalent, according to a report. Evidence of coronavirus infection is often present in waste samples, the scientists told FOX 2 of the Bay Area – and they decided that accessing samples from sewers would be more efficient than going door to door to request samples from residents. PLAN TO DETECT CORONAVIRUS IN WASTEWATER MAY HELP PINPOINT CONTACT TRACING NEEDS “Wastewater naturally pools the waste from hundreds to even millions of people in a single sample,’ team leader Kara Nelson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at UC Berkeley, told the station. “So if you can collect a representative sample of wastewater and analyze it, you can gain a tremendous amount of information that you likely couldn’t gain through testing people individually,” she added. Wastewater agencies from three Bay Area counties are assisting...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- In a BioSafety Level 2 lab at U.C. Berkeley, scientists spend all day looking at wastewater. At first read, it may sound gross but it is the work of a lifetime for scientists like Rose Kantor, a postdoctoral scholar at the Nelson lab. The lab was funded and staffed in a matter of months in response to the pandemic."This is a sample of raw sewage, this is 40 milliliters, it came from a manhole," said Kantor showing me a small vial, "this sample could represent up to a million people."The method works like this -- wastewater is collected over a 24-hour period, the sample is put through an 8-hour process to break down its contents, then tested for COVID-19.RELATED: Yosemite Valley's wastewater tests positive for COVID-19Scientists at the lab believe the method could be a promising new tool for public health agencies that have had trouble with mass testing, including long lineups and delayed results.Already, the lab has collected more than 500 samples all over the Bay Area, many of them testing positive for the virus."To...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) — A team of scientists from the University of California, Berkeley launched a pop-up lab this month to test wastewater from throughout the Bay Area for the novel coronavirus, the university said Thursday. After months of study, coronavirus researchers determined that people who contract COVID-19 tend to shed the virus in their feces, offering an easy way to monitor the virus’ spread inside a neighborhood or an entire city. Monitoring wastewater for the virus can also act as an early warning system for potential outbreaks before they occur, as people who contract the virus can shed it through feces before they start showing symptoms. “Wastewater naturally pools the waste from hundreds to even millions of people in a single sample, so if you can collect a representative sample of wastewater and analyze it, you can gain a tremendous amount of information that you likely couldn’t gain through testing people individually,” UC Berkeley professor of civil and environmental engineering Kara Nelson said. Nelson leads a team of scientists that intends to study Bay Area wastewater in a 1,200-square-foot...
    UC Berkeley East Bay university lands two Nobel prizes in two days, as biochemist Jennifer Doudna wins in chemistry for developing a revolutionary gene-editing tool and Reinhard Genzel wins in physics for black hole discoveries. Theme parks Facing bleak finances, amusement parks from Disneyland to the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk get little relief as Gov. Gavin Newsom says COVID-19 cases must fall significantly more for them to be allowed to re-open. Kamala Harris California senator won the VP debate against Republican Mike Pence, polls show. But it was an unremarkable affair dominated by predictable talking points that isn’t expected to have much effect on the overall race.
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — The parents of a missing University of California, Berkeley student are pleading for help in finding their daughter in a newly-released video. Sydney West was last heard from on September 30th. The 19-year-old’s last known location was in San Francisco near the area of Crissy Field and the Golden Gate Bridge. She was last seen wearing dark leggings, blue Vans shoes and a teal sweatshirt. Sydney West (San Francisco Police Dept.) “This is every parents worst nightmare. All we want is Sydnie brought home safe and brought back to our family,” her father says on the video. She is a white female with blonde hair, blue eyes, 5 foot 10 inches, and about 130 pounds. San Francisco police has urged anyone who sees West call 911 or their local law enforcement agency, prepared to provide information on her current location and clothing description, according to a press release.  
    BERKELEY, Calif. -- French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and University of California, Berkeley professor Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing known as CRISPR.The recipients were announced Wednesday in Stockholm by Goran Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.RELATED: University of California Berkeley professor awarded 2020 Nobel Prize in PhysicsDoudna is a Li Ka Shing Chancellor Chair Professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at CAL. She is also a professor at UC San Francisco. She grew up in Hawaii.CRISPR technology allows scientists to change DNA sequences and modify gene function. It can be useful in many areas including correcting genetic defects, treating disease and improving crops. Scientists at UCSF have used CRISPR to speed their search for a cure for HIV. It has also been controversial. In 2016, then Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, told Congress he worried the process could be used by rogue nations to create dangerous new biological agents.RELATED: Doctors try 1st CRISPR editing in the...
    BERKELEY, Calif. (KGO) -- French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and University of California, Berkeley professor Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing known as CRISPR.The recipients were announced Wednesday in Stockholm by Goran Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.RELATED: University of California Berkeley professor awarded 2020 Nobel Prize in PhysicsDoudna is a Li Ka Shing Chancellor Chair Professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at CAL. She is also a professor at UC San Francisco. She grew up in Hawaii.CRISPR technology allows scientists to change DNA sequences and modify gene function. It can be useful in many areas including correcting genetic defects, treating disease and improving crops. Scientists at UCSF have used CRISPR to speed their search for a cure for HIV. It has also been controversial. In 2016, then Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, told Congress he worried the process could be used by rogue nations to create dangerous new biological agents.RELATED: Doctors try 1st CRISPR editing in...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and University of California, Berkeley professor Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing known as CRISPR.The recipients were announced Wednesday in Stockholm by Goran Hansson, Secretary General of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.RELATED: University of California Berkeley professor awarded 2020 Nobel Prize in PhysicsDoudna is a Li Ka Shing Chancellor Chair Professor in the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at CAL. She is also a professor at UC San Francisco. She grew up in Hawaii.CRISPR technology allows scientists to change DNA sequences and modify gene function. It can be useful in many areas including correcting genetic defects, treating disease and improving crops. Scientists at UCSF have used CRISPR to speed their search for a cure for HIV. It has also been controversial. In 2016, then Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, told Congress he worried the process could be used by rogue nations to create dangerous new biological agents.RELATED: Doctors try 1st CRISPR editing in...
    BERKELEY (CBS SF) – A researcher at UC Berkeley whose work could lead to new contraceptives for men and women was among 21 recipients of the prestigious MacArthur genius grant. Polina Lishko, a physiologist and associate professor of molecular and cell biology, will receive $625,000 in funding over the next five years to continue her work, according to a university statement. In her research, Lishko studies sperm and ovarian cells to understand the cellular steps that allow sperm to find and fertilize eggs. She has identified several potential drugs that can interfere with sperm movement and prevent fertilization without the use of hormones, which cause side effects for many women. Polina Lishko, 2020 MacArthur Genius Grant recipient. (UC Berkeley) “The MacArthur fellowship is a life-changer. Psychologically, it is a huge boost — not only for me, but for the team, as well, because it shows a recognition of the importance of the field of reproductive physiology,” Lishko said. Lishko’s discoveries have been licensed by a startup she co-founded, YourChoice Theraputics, which hopes to make a non-hormonal contraceptive that women could...
    The UC system has inappropriately admitted dozens of well-connected students in the last seven years, according to a new state audit. Four of the system’s most elite schools admitted 64 applicants — including 42 at UC Berkeley — between the 2013-14 and 2018-19 academic years based families’ donations, relationships to campus staffers and other factors. Most of the students were white and came from families making at least $150,000 a year. The bombshell audit report comes a little more than a year after the nationwide Varsity Blues scandal, where wealthy Bay Area parents falsified test scores and athletic status and paid hefty sums to get their kids into selective colleges. The audit says 22 students were admitted through an athletic admissions process “even though they possessed little athletic talent.” The wrongly admitted students prevented other, more qualified students from gaining admission, especially at UC Berkeley. “The pervasiveness of this problem at UC Berkeley demonstrates that campus leadership has failed to establish a campus culture that values commitment to an admissions process based on fairness and applicants’ merits and achievements,” the...
    The University of California’s top health executive has told UC officials to prepare to continue online learning and limited access to campus beyond the fall as the COVID-19 pandemic will probably cause at least another year of disruption to university operations. “This is not something that will go away quickly,” Dr. Carrie L. Byington, who heads UC Health, told regents during their two-day online meeting this week. The university’s $13-billion health enterprise includes 19 health professional schools and six health systems, five of them academic medical centers. So far, UC campuses have not announced plans for winter and spring — unlike the California State University system, which said this month that campuses will stay primarily online through the rest of the academic year. But Byington told The Times on Thursday that she has discussed with top UC officials the possible need to continue largely online operations. “Yes, I have discussed the need to prepare for continued distance learning and decreased density on campuses beyond the fall term with the chancellors, president and regents,” Byington said. “Much will depend on...
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