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    Working days that bleed into the evening. Endless Zoom meetings and passive-aggressive emails. Noisy neighbours, children, chores and walking the dog... The delights of working from home will no doubt be familiar to many in post-lockdown Britain. Prior to the pandemic, only one in eight of us were home-workers, and in many cases this was only some of the time. In what has been the biggest gear shift in employment for decades, today just under half of Britain’s working population – about 13.4 million – have swapped the office to work from their living rooms, kitchens and home studies. And it is having a serious impact on our mental health, according to the culture guru Malcolm Gladwell. Speaking on the podcast Diary Of A CEO last week, the author of The Tipping Point and Outliers said: ‘It’s very hard to feel necessary when you’re physically disconnected,’ adding that ‘as we face the battle that all organisations are facing now in getting people back into the office, it’s really hard to explain this core psychological truth, which is that we want...
    GRABBING a quick meal in a rush can often mean we choose fattening and unhealthy options. One way to avoid this is to stock up on meals that are packed with nutrients. 3Soupologie has a range of pots, available in supermarkets Some are not cheap but, when you’re in a rush, they can be worth it as there is no waste and you know you’re looking after your body. Jane Atkinson puts the latest quick and healthy meals to the test. Read More on HealthHOT STUFF Heatwave alert extended again as health chiefs warn young kids & elderly at riskCRISIS POINT 1 in 6 kids plagued by mental health issues - five signs you must not ignore Five a day A POT of food that gives you five of your five a day in one go is pretty good in my book. Soupologie has a range of pots, available in supermarkets, that are packed with nutrients and are all low fat or fat-free, low carbs, low salt and low calorie. I tried the 5-A-Day burrito bowl plant pot which has...
    (CNN)When Frances Garrett lost her mentally ill daughter to police violence in 2014, she channeled her grief by demanding change. Garrett said Phoenix police fatally shot Michelle Cusseaux at her apartment after she threatened officers with a hammer. Police, Garrett said, were not properly trained to respond to someone like Cusseaux, who was schizophrenic. "Police are not professionals on mental health or mental illness," Garrett told CNN. "A person that is schizophrenic, paranoid, the first thing they do when they see an officer in a uniform is panic. They resist." Garrett successfully lobbied for the city to improve its response to reports of people having mental health crises. In 2017, Phoenix rolled out a "mental health squad" comprised of officers who receive special training in crisis intervention, negotiation and tactical skills designed to diffuse situations with mentally ill people. "They made changes," Garrett said. "I wanted to prevent it from happening to anyone else."Read MoreMichelle Cusseaux's 3-year-old niece looks in her casket during funeral services in 2014.While Phoenix police have made changes, across the country, mentally ill people continue to...
    A British student who was paralysed after a 2,000lb bison gored her and tossed her 15ft in the air may be left stranded in the US after her health insurance said it will withdraw support. Amelia Dean - known as Mia - was travelling in South Dakota during a gap year road trip when the beast tore the femoral artery in her left thigh during the shocking attack on June 16. While she was fighting for her life in hospital, her parents Matthew and Jacqueline launched a GoFundMe to raise £140,000 to transfer their daughter to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, for specialist treatment. They had hoped to raise enough money for the extensive treatment the 19-year-old required in the US. However, shocking healthcare insurance rules mean Mia and her family have been faced with a grim decision after her provider let them know they plan to withdraw support. The decision before the family is to either fly home to Brockham in Surrey on insurance this weekend before she is ready, or stay in the US where she will essentially...
    Close friends of Olivia Newton-John knew the superstar's condition was worsening in her last months when the beloved entertainer stopped answering her phone. Olivia, who shot to fame as the star of the hit movie Grease in 1978, died on Monday morning surrounded by family at her home in southern California following a long battle with breast cancer. And Jane Seymour, a close friend of Olivia, has revealed the sad extent of the star's deteriorating health during an interview with US program Entertainment Tonight. Former Bond girl Jane Seymour (pictured) told of her anguish in a recent interview with US show Entertainment Tonight. The celebrated revealed the sad extant of her friend Olivia Newton-John's deteriorating health in the superstar's last days The 71-year-old former Bond girl said the day before the superstar died Jane had been spending time with mutual friends. 'We were talking about her, and how [Olivia] had not been answering our texts,' a clearly moved Jane said during the interview. RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Olivia Newton-John's final performance: Selfless Aussie......
    After a lot of debating and negotiating, the U.S. Senate narrowly passed the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 on Sunday, August 7. The far-reaching $750 billion package, which now goes to the U.S. House of Representatives for consideration, addresses energy, climate change, health care and taxes. Liberal economist/New York Times opinion writer Paul Krugman, in his August 8 column, analyzes this development — mostly from a climate change standpoint. And he stresses that that while the Inflation Reduction Act is not an environmental panacea, it is nonetheless an important step in dealing with the enormous threat that climate change poses. “They really did it,” Krugman enthusiastically writes. “The Inflation Reduction Act, which is mainly a climate change bill with a side helping of health reform, passed the Senate on Sunday; by all accounts, it will easily pass the House. So, it’s about to become law. This is a very big deal.” READ MORE: Why executive orders on climate change may not be enough Krugman continues, “The act isn’t, by itself, enough to avert climate disaster. But it’s a...
    The traveling ICU nurse who killed six people in a horror crash in Los Angeles on Thursday after plowing her Mercedes 90mph through a busy intersection has a 'profound'  history of mental illness and has been involved in 13 prior crashes, but was still somehow subcontracted to work in a hospital and allowed to drive.  Nicole Lorraine Linton, 37, is in custody on six murder charges as a result of Thursday's crash.  Among those she killed was pregnant Asherey Ryan, 23, her one-year-old son Alonzo and Reynold Lester, the father of Asherey's unborn baby, who also died.  On Tuesday, Craig Pitchford was named as another victim. Two other female victims remain unidentified.  Linton is from Houston, Texas, and was in Los Angeles working as a contractor at the Kaiser Permanente West Los Angeles Hospital.  She was working for the nursing contractor group AMN Healthcare, which she joined in October 2020.  Nicole Lorraine Linton, 37, is in custody on six murder charges as a result of Thursday's crash Linton sped through a red light at 90mph, plowing into cars at a busy intersection on...
    Amid one of the worst public-health crises in history, a record number of Americans are without health insurance.John Fedele The Inflation Reduction Act just passed by the Senate will cap insulin at $35 per month for Medicare beneficiaries. But that dashed hopes to curb insulin prices for a broader set of the diabetes patient population, about 7.9 million of whom rely on insulin, according to new research from Yale University. The cost of insulin can break diabetes patients financially. Yale's research found 14% of people in the U.S. who use insulin experience "catastrophic" levels of spending on the treatment. When normal housing and food expenditures are subtracted from their incomes, at least 40% of the remaining money is dedicated to paying for insulin. More from Personal Finance:Expanded health subsidies included in Inflation Reduction Act Retirees may be focusing on wrong risks to financial securityMore Americans living paycheck to paycheck due to inflation Of Medicare beneficiaries who use insulin, 1 in 5 reach catastrophic spending, according to Baylee Bakkila, a lead researcher on the Yale School of Medicine's team focused on...
    (CNN)Three Palestinian men were killed during an Israeli military operation against suspected militants in the West Bank on Tuesday morning, according to information from the Palestinian health ministry. Among the dead is Ibrahim Al-Nabulsi, a regional militant commander in the north of the West Bank, and the apparent target of the Israeli raid. The other men killed have been named by Palestinian health ministry officials as Islam Sabbouh and Hussein Jamal Taha.A statement from the Popular Resistance Committees (PRC), a loose affiliation of smaller armed groups, hailed the three men's deaths as a heroic act of resistance.While closely linked, the PRC is regarded as separate from the armed wings of Islamic Jihad (the Quds Brigades) and Hamas (the Qassam Brigades).Israeli forces surrounded a building in the old city of Nablus early Tuesday before targeting it with a shoulder-fired missile, an Israeli statement said, triggering an exchange of gunfire.Read MoreThe Al-Quds Brigades, the military wing of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad militant group, said on Telegram that its members in Nablus were involved in "violent confrontations with enemy special forces as they...
    FOR Annie Arkwright, the fact that huge numbers of young people are seeking mental health support comes as no surprise. The mum of two from Shropshire has been calling for better support for teens since her 19-year-old daughter Lily took her own life in 2020. 8Huge numbers of young people are seeking mental health supportCredit: Getty 8According to the NHS, rates of probable mental health disorders have increased since 2017Credit: Getty 8Annie Arkwright says: 'Please don’t think suicide is something that won’t happen in your family or to anyone you know and love'Credit: Annie Arkwright 8Annie 's daughter Lily - a bright and bubbly teen took her own life, leaving behind her mum and brother JontyCredit: supplied Now, new research claims more than one in three teenagers has been prescribed antidepressants, a figure that has escalated since the pandemic. According to the poll by youth mental health charity stem4, around 37 per cent of youngsters aged 12 to 18 say they have been offered the drugs by doctors. It comes as struggling NHS services are being forced to turn desperate...
    (CNN)If the US House soon passes the Senate's landmark climate change and health care bill, it will help validate the Democrats' monopoly on political power in Washington and hand Joe Biden a notable presidential legacy ahead of November's midterm elections. The measure finally squeezed through the Senate after an exhausting and dramatic round-the-clock marathon that stretched into Sunday afternoon -- a major breakthrough following months of Democratic infighting that gouged deep divides in the party.The Inflation Reduction Act may not live up to its name and cut the cost of living. It dashed some big dreams of progressives who wanted it to do more. And its final passage may come too late to save Democrats in the midterms. But it's still an enormous win for the party that seemed impossible just weeks ago. Whats in the Manchin-Schumer deal on climate, health care and taxesIn a goal Democrats have been chasing for decades, the legislation will for the first time give Medicare the power to negotiate the cost of a limited basket of prescription drugs, thereby bringing down costs. In extending...
    New York officials are warning that hundreds of Empire state residents may already be infected with the devastating polio virus after it was detected in wastewater of a second county in the state. State surveillance detected presence of the polio virus in at least two different areas of Orange County, New York - around an hours drive from New York City - in June and July. It comes within weeks of officials announcing a confirmed polio case in Rockland County - just northwest of the Big Apple's Bronx borough. The virus was also detected in Rockland wastewater last month. Because polio is asymptomatic in a majority of cases, it is likely that the detection of one symptomatic case means there could be hundreds of others that will never be detected. Finding the virus in wastewater samples in multiple counties confirms fears that the virus has been spreading in the state for sometime before the Rockland case was detected. Officials are urging the population to get vaccinated to prevent a resurgence of the devastating virus. Orange and Rockland are both among...
    AN urgent monkeypox warning has been issued amid fears the virus could become endemic in the UK. Around 2,468 infections have been confirmed across the country - with at least 77 'highly probable' cases. 2Groups have warned that the outbreak could become an endemic in the UKCredit: Getty 2The chart above shows some of the most common monkeypox symptoms An endemic state refers to a disease or condition regularly found amongst a population. While medics at the UK Health Security have urged Brits to stay calm, the US this week declared a public health emergency over the virus. The declaration came after the World Health Organization (WHO) also called the outbreak a global emergency. Now, both politicians and LGBT+ groups have demanded the government increase its efforts to help curb the spread. Read more on monkeypoxVIRAL LOAD I'm an expert - here's everything you need to know about monkeypox in childrenVIRUS DEATH Second monkeypox death confirmed in Europe amid rising cases across the globe Vaccines have already been rolled out in some parts, but the group has said this now...
    Zoom In IconArrows pointing outwards The U.S. economy added many more jobs than expected last month, and there was an appetite for workers particularly in the service sector, which has been grappling with labor shortages. The leisure and hospitality sector saw the most jobs growth with 96,000 payrolls added in July, led by strong expansion in food and drinking places, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Restaurants and airlines have been scrambling to repopulate their ranks ever since the economy started to reopen. Covid-triggered lockdowns in 2020 had led to massive layoffs and furloughs for cooks and waitstaff and other service staff. Meanwhile, employment in professional and business services continued to grow, with an increase of 89,000 in July. Within the industry, job growth was widespread in management of companies and enterprises, architectural and engineering services as well as scientific research and development. "It's not just a strong total number that highlights the health of the job market — growth was across the board and not limited to one or two sectors," said Mike Loewengart, managing director of investment...
    (CNN)There's no test for long Covid. There's no specific drug to take or exercises to do to ease its symptoms. There isn't a consensus on what long Covid symptoms are, and some doctors even doubt that it's real. Yet with vast numbers of people having had Covid-19, and estimates ranging from 7.7 million to 23 million long Covid patients in the US alone, researchers say it has the potential to be "the next public health disaster in the making." The Biden administration released two reports this week to initiate a whole-government effort to prevent, detect and treat long Covid. Two new studies also try to gather some of the small pieces of the puzzle that is long Covid.The Biden long Covid agendaPresident Joe Biden said in April that long Covid was a priority for his administration and ordered two reports: one that lays out a research agenda for the country and one that sketches out the federally funded services and support available for people in the US with long Covid. A total of 14 government departments and agencies worked together...
    (CNN)The Democrats' budget reconciliation package has gained more heft after West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin agreed to add back several climate and tax provisions.Still, the effort remains a mere shadow of the sweeping $3.5 trillion reconciliation package that the majority party initially floated last year.After torpedoing the inclusion of any climate or tax provisions in mid-July, Manchin, a moderate Democrat, has reversed course. The measures join a handful of important but narrow provisions to lower prescription drug prices and to extend enhanced Affordable Care Act subsidies for three years.Gone are the creation of a universal pre-K program, an extension of the enhanced child tax credit, an expansion of Medicare benefits, the establishment of a federally funded paid family and sick leave program and many other provisions aimed at broadening the nation's social safety net.The deal currently under discussion is far smaller than the slimmed-down $1.75 trillion version the House passed in October. But Manchin, whose vote is crucial to pushing any legislation through the Senate via the reconciliation process, shot down the House bill in December.Read MoreSince then, Democratic leaders...
    People protest during a rally calling for more government action to combat the spread of monkeypox at Foley Square on July 21, 2022 in New York City.Jeenah Moon | Getty Images The Biden administration is declaring monkeypox a public health emergency as the U.S. outbreak has grown into the largest in the world, the nation's top health official said Thursday. Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra's emergency declaration will help mobilize more resources to fight the outbreak, which has spread swiftly since health authorities in Boston confirmed the first U.S. case in May. The last time the U.S. declared a public health emergency was in response to Covid-19 in January 2020. The U.S. has confirmed more than 6,600 cases of monkeypox in 48 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico as of Thursday, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The real number of infections is likely higher than the official data because patients can only get tested after they develop a rash, which can take a week or more after the initial exposure to the virus. "In...
    MONKEYPOX cases in the United States are on the rise as the country remains on high alert. Due to the recent rise in cases, the Biden administration has classified the situation as a public health emergency. 2Monkeypox reached the United States in May 2022Credit: Getty How many monkeypox cases are there in the US? On May 18, 2022, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention learned that one United States resident had a confirmed case of monkeypox after returning to the US from Canada. Since then, a total of 6,617 individuals have tested positive in the US for monkeypox, according to CDC data. With the numbers continuing the rise, President Joe Biden has declared the situation a public health emergency. Read More monkeypox casesVIRAL ALERT Monkeypox cases hit 6,617 in US with Biden 'to declare virus health emergency'NEW THREAT Monkeypox cases in kids hits 4 in US as American infections reach 5,811 “In light of all of these developments and the evolving circumstances on the ground, I want to make an announcement today that I will...
    Polio virus particle, computer illustration.Kateryna Kon | Science Photo Library | Getty Images Polio has been found in wastewater samples taken from two counties outside of New York City indicating the virus is spreading in the community, according to state health officials. Wastewater samples taken from two different locations in Orange County during June and July tested positive for the virus, according to the New York State Department of Health. The findings come after an unvaccinated adult in Rockland County contracted polio, suffered paralysis and had to be hospitalized last month. Polio was subsequently found in Rockland County wastewater samples. Rockland County neighbors Orange County. "These environmental findings — which further indicate potential community spread — in addition to the paralytic polio case identified among a Rockland County resident, underscore the urgency of every New York adult and child getting immunized against polio, especially those in the greater New York metropolitan area," New York health officials said. The polio strain the adult in Rockland County caught suggests the chain of transmission did not begin in the United States. The strain...
    Monkeypox becoming endemic in the U.S. would be the 'worst public health failure in modern times' because it could have been prevented, an ex-Food and Drug Administration director has said. Writing in an op-ed over the weekend, Dr Scott Gottlieb pointed out that — unlike when Covid first emerged — there were already reliable vaccines and tests available to stop the disease in its tracks. But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) failed to act rapidly, instead following the same 'protracted checklist' and making many of the same mistakes as when Covid struck. He wrote in the New York Times that should the disease gain a foothold it would be a disaster both because it could have been prevented and as infections — which spark blisters across body — are painful. Many sufferers have said their symptoms were 'worse than Covid'. Last month Gottlieb predicted the tally of cases — then 1,800 — were just a fraction of the actual number. Since then it has risen to more than 5,000 with the CDC now detecting about 250 new...
    There is growing concern that the United States may have lost its chance to contain the monkeypox virus, as the nation has been slow to vaccinate those most at risk on a broader scale. “I think we’re going to have to live with it until they vaccinate every high-risk person,” Dr. Robert Murphy, executive director of the Havey Institute for Global Health at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, said this week. Vaccinating against monkeypox has been a part of the Biden administration’s response to the global outbreak since the nation identified its first case of the disease in May, but supplies have been limited, even as demand for protection from the virus surges. At first, officials at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that vaccines for monkeypox were being released from the Strategic National Stockpile and offered to the “high-risk” contacts of monkeypox patients, as well as the health-care workers treating them. Vaccinating someone already exposed to monkeypox to help prevent illness is called post-exposure prophylaxis or a ring vaccination strategy. Vaccinating a patient’s...
    A SECOND monkeypox fatality in Europe has been confirmed today. Another patient has died of the highly-infectious virus in Spain after Europe's first monkeypox death yesterday evening. 1Over 4,000 cases have been reported in Spain so farCredit: AFP Health chiefs confirmed the tragedy today it revealed 4,298 cases have so far been reported in Spain. No further details are known about the people who have died. The vast majority of those diagnosed with the disease in the country have been men. Just 64 female patients have been treated. Spain has been particularly badly-hit by the disease. Read more HealthNIGHT FRIGHT I’m a dream expert and here’s what the 4 most common nightmares meanMUM'S INSTINCTS Docs said my twins were just 'lazy' - now they're fighting for their lives The earliest cases, recorded in May, were linked to a gay sauna in Madrid and a Pride festival in Gran Canaria. Brazil also reported its first monkeypox death yesterday. The man who died was described as a 41-year-old who also suffered from lymphoma and a weakened immune system. Last week, the World Health Organisation declared monkeypox...
    SPAIN has confirmed its first monkeypox death - and Europe’s first fatality from the virus. The five previous reported deaths were all in African nations. 1Europe's first monkeypox fatality has been confirmed. The victim died in Spain, which has been particularly badly-hit by the diseaseCredit: Reuters Spain’s Ministry of Health confirmed the fatality today it revealed 4,298 cases have so far been notified. Officials gave no details about the person who had died and when it had happened. Only 64 of the confirmed cases in Spain have been women. The country has been particularly badly-hit, with more than 3,000 cases. The earliest, in May, were linked to a gay sauna in Madrid and a Pride festival in Gran Canaria. Last week, the World Health Organisation declared monkeypox a global health emergency, meaning it now views the current outbreak as enough of a significant threat that a coordinated international response is needed. The WHO announcement came after the virus spread to more than 75 countries. The organisation’s Director General Dr Tedros Adhanmon Ghebreyesus said the risk of people catching the virus...
    (CNN)As summer edges closer and temperatures gradually rise, more and more of us will take to the water in search of a range of benefits for body and mind.Not a fan of running? Swimming may not merely be a good alternative, but a more efficient one.Using all your muscles, swimming ensures a full body workout and as such, 30 minutes of exercise in the water is equivalent to 45 minutes on land, according to Swim England.Even a leisurely swim can burn upwards of 400 calories an hour, over double the amount of walking.The comparative low impact of water activities in contrast to running make them perfect outlets for those nursing minor injuries, as well as the elderly.Read MoreAnd it's not just short-term gains, there's also lasting benefits to swimming.Regular swimmers have a 28% lower risk of early death and a 41% lower risk of death due to heart diseases and stroke, according to a report by Swim England's Swimming and Health Commission in 2017. Calm waters While the physical boosts of swimming are widely documented, the mental health benefits of...
    As successive waves of COVID-19 have swept across the Southland, Michael Matteo Rossi, a 35 year-old filmmaker who lives in Los Feliz, has gamely masked up whenever he shopped, ate out or visited with his parents, who are in their 70s. “I’ve never been like someone who walks into a Walmart without a mask, looking to make a big stink,” said Rossi, who is vaccinated. “I’m all about respect.” But now, with Los Angeles County potentially on the verge of a renewed indoor masking mandate, his feelings have changed. With hospitalizations and deaths far below the peaks of the winter Omicron surge, Rossi said he feels safe mingling, maskless, in indoor spaces with his parents and friends. His surgical mask, once an ever-present accessory, is abandoned somewhere in his car. He hopes it’s not coming back. It may not need to. Support for renewed mask mandates has softened among medical and public health professionals as well. Despite L.A. County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer’s plans to reinstate a mask mandate as soon as Friday if coronavirus conditions didn’t...
    Share this: NYU Langone Health is the top hospital in New York State and No. 3 in the country, according to U.S. News & World Report’s annual Best Hospitals Honor Roll released today. These rankings include NYU Langone’s inpatient locations in Manhattan as well as NYU Langone Hospital — Brooklyn and NYU Langone Hospital — Long Island. U.S. News & World Report also credits NYU Langone with the No. 1 Neurology & Neurosurgery department in the country, among 14 other nationally ranked specialties, six of which also made the top 5 list. Earlier this year, NYU Grossman School of Medicine ranked No. 2 in the nation for research on the 2022- 2023 U.S. News & World Report “Best Graduate Schools” list.  The combination of the US News rankings position NYU Langone as the top academic health system in the country devoted to patient care, education, and research.  “This recognition is reflective of one standard of care (one hospital provider number) that is consistently supported by our faculty and staff across each of our hospitals,” says Robert I. Grossman, MD,...
    A new artificial intelligence (AI) is capable of spotting mental health conditions by sifting through brain imaging data to find patterns linked to autism, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s - and it can do so before the symptoms set in. The model was first trained with brain images from healthy adults and then shown those with mental health issues, allowing it to identify tiny changes that go unnoticed by the human eye. The sophisticated computer program was developed by a team of researchers led by Georgia State who note the it could one day detect Alzheimer’s in someone as young as 40 years old, which is about 25 years before symptoms start to appear. By catching such diseases early would help patients receive treatment that lessens or even eliminates the mental illness. The AI was trained on a massive dataset of more than 10,000 people to understand functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which measures brain activity by detecting changes with blood flow. Scroll down for video  The AI is able to find patterns in brain scans that are linked to mental health...
    Α helicopter flies over and along the North Shore of Lake Superior. The sound of the rotor blades evokes both melancholy and pause. Life Flight. When Life Flight is in the air, it’s hard not to wake. No matter the time day or night, each and every time, a friend who lives 600 feet from me in a certified wildlife habitat, texts me to say: “Throwing some prayers up.” Article continues after advertisement The scissor-like pulse of the rotor blades resonates and reverberate through the community’s air and our hearts. Chances are, you see, we know the person — or the family of the person — being rushed to Duluth for medical care. This sound is difficult to ignore as this is a peaceful place where the noise of car traffic and police sirens are thankfully supplanted by the orchestra of beavers building on The Baptism, wolves howling on The Gunflint, Whip-poor-wills singing along the Big Lake and Sand Cranes banking majestically over Good Harbor Hill. But there is another sound that frequently disrupts the northern skies in the summer months. CEOs, CFOs and senators from all over the...
    Fifty years ago today (July 25), the Associated Press pulled the curtain back on the infamous Tuskegee Study. U.S. Public Health Service doctors had been withholding treatment from hundreds of Black men with syphilis for 40 years. Worse, the doctors, who wanted to study the consequences of untreated syphilis, lied to their patients— telling them they had “bad blood” (a colloquial term often used to describe anemia, fatigue, and other conditions), and administering vitamins, iron tonics, diagnostic spinal taps and other fake “treatments.” The researchers tried, sometimes unsuccessfully, to keep the study’s subjects from receiving appropriate care over the years. Reports about the study appeared in medical journals over the decades, but only a handful of health practitioners tried to stop it. But the study did not end until four months after Jean Heller’s AP story appeared. By then only 74 of the 399 original subjects were still alive; 128 had died of syphilis or its complications, 40 of their wives or sexual partners were known to have been infected, and 19 of their children had been born with congenital...
    The World Health Organization took a massive step in declaring monkeypox a global health emergency on Saturday, which has rapidly spread to 75 countries infecting tens of thousands of people. The W.H.O.’s director general, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus parted with a panel of advisors, who could not make a final decision, and declared monkeypox a “public health emergency of international concern.” This is the first time that the director general has broken deadlock and bypassed his advising panel to declare an emergency of this nature. Currently, this terminology is only used to describe two other diseases, Covid-19 and polio. Dr. Tedros argued that monkeypox meets the criteria for this designation because it is spreading rapidly “through new modes of transmission, about which we understand too little.” This declaration is designed to set in motion an international response, possibly unlocking funding resources in order to determine proper treatments and courses of action to limit the spread of the disease. Dr. Tedros said the risk of monkeypox remains moderate globally, however, in Europe, the W.H.O. rated the risk as high. Monkeypox spreads...
    Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich (R) announced Thursday that the Arizona Attorney General’s Office (AGO) had awarded $4,500,000 in grant funding to three counties across Arizona to help treat those with opioid addiction or mental health issues in the criminal justice system. “Our primary goal with these grants is to increase inmate screening and treatment for underlying substance abuse and mental health conditions,” Brnovich said in a press release. “Effectively addressing opioid disorders will ultimately reduce recidivism rates among treated offenders.” The AGO reports that the funds come from a previous settlement between a coalition of 48 states plus five U.S. territories and consulting giant McKinsey & Company. The settlement resolved investigations into the company’s role in working with, promoting, and profiting from opioid companies during the current opioid epidemic. The three counties receiving the grant money include Yavapai, Mohave, and Coconino. The AGO specifies that Yavapai and Mohave counties will receive $1 million each once the money is split, and Coconino will get $2.5 million. All three counties revealed their plans to use the money to help criminals struggling...
    Two cases of monkeypox have been identified in children in the United States, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday. The two cases are unrelated and probably the result of household transmission, the CDC said. One case is a toddler who is a resident of California. The other is an infant who is not a US resident. Public health officials are investigating how the children were infected. Both have symptoms but are in good health and receiving treatment with an antiviral medication named tecovirimat or TPOXX, which the CDC recommends for children under the age of 8 because they are considered to be at higher risk from infection. Since the monkeypox outbreak began in May, most of the cases have happened among men who have sex with men. However, anyone can catch the virus through close skin-to-skin contact. In the case of children, the agency said this could include “holding, cuddling, feeding, as well as through shared items such as towels, bedding, cups, and utensils.” The CDC says the Jynneos monkeypox vaccine is being made available for...
    (CNN)Two cases of monkeypox have been identified in children in the United States, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.The two cases are unrelated and probably the result of household transmission, the CDC said.One case is a toddler who is a resident of California. The other is an infant who is not a US resident. Public health officials are investigating how the children were infected. Monkeypox spreading in cluster events, but vaccines can help stop it, local health officials sayBoth have symptoms but are in good health and receiving treatment with an antiviral medication named tecovirimat or TPOXX, which the CDC recommends for children under the age of 8 because they are considered to be at higher risk from infection.Since the monkeypox outbreak began in May, most of the cases have happened among men who have sex with men. However, anyone can catch the virus through close skin-to-skin contact. In the case of children, the agency said this could include "holding, cuddling, feeding, as well as through shared items such as towels, bedding, cups, and utensils." Read...
    The World Health Organization (WHO) in Europe announced on Friday that the heat wave affecting Europe was responsible for 1,700 deaths in the Iberian Peninsula alone and called for joint efforts to tackle climate change. Contacted by AFP, the UN body explained that the figure was a preliminary estimate based on data from national authorities. The organization added that the number has “already increased” and “will continue to increase in the coming days”. According to the WHO, the actual number associated with the heat wave will not be known for weeks. “Heat kills. In recent decades, hundreds of thousands of people have died from extreme heat during long heat waves, often linked to wildfires,” WHO Europe Director Hans Kluge said in a statement. Hans Kluge said exposure to extreme temperatures “often worsens pre-existing health conditions,” and noted that babies, children and the elderly are particularly at risk. He also highlighted the impact of bushfires, insisting we are halfway through ‘that scorching summer’. “Finally, this week’s events underline once again the desperate need for European action to effectively tackle climate change,”...
    NEW YORK (AP) — The spread of monkeypox in the U.S. could represent the dawn of a new sexually transmitted disease, though some health officials say the virus that causes pimple-like bumps might yet be contained before it gets firmly established. Experts don’t agree on the likely path of the disease, with some fearing that it is becoming so widespread that it is on the verge of becoming an entrenched STD — like gonorrhea, herpes and HIV. But no one’s really sure, and some say testing and vaccines can still stop the outbreak from taking root. So far, more than 2,400 U.S. cases have been reported as part of an international outbreak that emerged two months ago. Health officials are not sure how fast the virus has spread. They have only limited information about people who have been diagnosed, and they don’t know how many infected people might be spreading it unknowingly. They also don’t know how well vaccines and treatments are working. One impediment: Federal health officials do not have the authority to collect and connect data on who...
    Monkeypox cases exploded in New York City because the Federal Government failed to supply vaccines quickly, the city's head of public health has insisted. Speaking in an interview with CNN, Dr Ashwin Vasan, commissioner of NYC Health, warned the city's tally of 500-odd cases — the highest in America — was likely just a fraction of the total. He claimed the 'root cause' of the rapid spread of the illness was a failure by federal officials to roll out jabs against the disease quickly. New York City (NYC) and Washington D.C. are offering the jabs to gay or bisexual men who have multiple sexual partners every two weeks in an attempt to put a lid on the outbreak. But their roll outs have been repeatedly blasted for not offering enough doses, with available appointments being fully booked minutes after they are opened. NYC is now delaying second doses — due four weeks after the first dose — because the priority is to roll out first jabs. The city says this is safe, but other experts have raised concerns as this...
    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York health officials report polio case, the first one in U.S. in nearly a decade. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    President Joe Biden has contracted COVID-19, the White House announced on Thursday morning. 'This morning, President Biden tested positive for COVID-19. He is fully vaccinated and twice boosted and experiencing very mild symptoms,' said Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre.  'He has begun taking Paxlovid. Consistent with CDC guidelines, he will isolate at the White House and will continue to carry out all of his duties fully during that time.' She said the White House will provide a daily update on his health. 'Consistent with White House protocol for positive COVID cases, which goes above and beyond CDC guidance, he will continue to work in isolation until he tests negative,' she added. 'Once he tests negative, he will return to in-person work.'
    Michael Schumacher's former F1 manager has once again accused the German racing driver's family of 'lying' about the star's health - and says he's still angry at being frozen out.  Willi Weber accused the Schumachers of withholding information about the seven-time world champion, who has been kept out of the public eye ever since suffering a horrific skiing accident in France in 2013.  Speaking to Gazzetta dello Sport, Mr Weber, who suggested he had been ignored by the family, said: 'I could understand the situation initially as I always did everything I could for Michael to protect his private life.  'But since then, we have only heard lies from them. Years after the accident, I said to myself to just look out for the family as I couldn't change things. He was like a son to me. Even today it hurts me to talk about it.' Mr Weber's comments come as Corinna, 53, wife of the Formula One champion, and her daughter Gina, 25, attended the awarding of the North Rhine-Westphalia State Prize to Schumacher. Michael Schumacher's F1 manager has once again accused...
    Erica Timko Olson’s favorite place to be is outside in the natural world. Growing up on a farm in rural Minnesota, she and her three siblings spent as little time as possible indoors. Some of that outdoor time was devoted to farm chores, but most was spent just having fun in nature. Timko Olson couldn’t get enough.  “I don’t ever remember my parents having to tell me to get outside,” she recalled. “I was outside as much as I could.” All that outdoor time, she believes, kept her healthy, both physically and mentally.   Timko Olson has worked hard to pass on her love of nature to her six children. She sees it as a healthy habit with nothing but positive side effects: “We find that as people spend time in nature it decreases their confusion and increases clarity and connectedness to self. It also lowers their blood pressure and decreases stress hormones. These are all good things.” Article continues after advertisement Today, as a clinical assistant professor at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing and the Earl E. Bakken...
    BRITS are flocking to beaches up and down the UK today to bask in the 30C heat. It comes as extreme heat warnings are in place from today ahead of an "exceptional hot spell on Monday and Tuesday”. 5The picturesque seaside resort of Lyme Regis is rammed with sunseekersCredit: Alamy 5Crowds sit on the harbour wall at the Bristol Harbour FestivalCredit: LNP 5Suely Silva pours a bottle of water over Stuart Henderson to cool down outside their beach hutCredit: BNPS 5Meghan Burgeen, 22, and Emily Stevens, 23, Enjoy the beach at St Annes on Sea LancashireCredit: Dave Nelson 5A young man keeping cool while sunbathing in Greenwich Park, LondonCredit: LNP Huge crowds have rushed to Britain’s coasts to cool off as the mercury rises. Snaps from Lyme Regis, Dorset show hundreds of sweaty Brits packed onto the beach. Meanwhile, in Bristol huge crowds have been sitting on the harbour wall at the Bristol Harbour Festival - celebrating its 50th anniversary. In London, the lack of sand and sea has pushed sunbathers towards the capital’s parks where young people have been...
    (CNN)In 2016, the Indianapolis Star broke the news that Larry Nassar, the team doctor of the US women's national gymnastics team, had used his position to perpetuate sexually abuse -- as it later turned out, of hundreds of girls and young women. Six years later, the same paper reported the story of a 10-year old Ohio girl who had been sexually assaulted. The child was six weeks and three days pregnant -- three days past the cutoff in her state for legal abortion. The story went viral, with President Joe Biden asking Americans to "imagine being that little girl." Mary Ziegler And yet the response to the story, for many, was scorn and disbelief. Republican US Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio blasted the story as "another lie." Ohio attorney general Dave Yost joined Fox News anchors in suggesting that the story had been made up. The Wall Street Journal described the report as "too good to be true." Kristi Noem, the governor of South Dakota, labeled the story "#FakeNews from the liberal media." Read More Almost before the...
    This past week brought home the magnitude of the overlapping crises assailing the global economy, intensifying fears of recession, job losses, hunger and a plunge on stock markets. At the root of this torment is a force so elemental that it has almost ceased to warrant mention — the pandemic. That force is far from spent, confronting policymakers with grave uncertainty. Their policy tools are better suited for more typical downturns, not a rare combination of diminishing economic growth and soaring prices. Major economies including the United States and France reported their latest data on inflation, revealing that prices on a vast range of goods rose faster in June than anytime in four decades. Those grim numbers increased the likelihood that central banks would move even more aggressively to raise interest rates as a means of slowing price increases — a course expected to cost jobs, batter financial markets and threaten poor countries with debt crises. On Friday, China reported that its economy, the world’s second-largest, expanded by a mere 0.4% from April through June compared with the same period...
    (CNN)The Biden administration on Friday extended the Covid-19 public health emergency for another three months.US Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra officially renewed the declaration, extending it through October 13, 2022.The emergency declaration has been in place since January 2020, and the latest renewal comes as the Omicron offshoot BA.5, the most contagious variant yet, continues to stake its claim in the US. Daily case rates, though vastly undercounted, are the highest they've been in months, as are Covid-19 hospitalizations and deaths. Why the Omicron offshoot BA.5 is a big dealData published this week by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that more than half of the country's population lives in a county with a "high Covid-19 Community Level," where the health care system is at risk of becoming overburdened and universal indoor masking is recommended. "The Public Health Emergency declaration continues to provide us with tools and authorities needed to respond to the highly transmissible COVID-19 subvariants that are currently circulating around the country," a Biden administration official told CNN. "The PHE provides...
    Princess Charlene of Monaco looked sleek in black as she enjoyed cocktails with her husband and guests in the palace gardens. The Princess, who has recently returned to the public eye after months of absence due to 'health issues', joined her husband Prince Albert to meet with guests yesterday evening.   The Princess paired her black, frilled dress with a statement silver necklace, which complemented her signature pixie-crop.  Her dewy make-up made her complexion flawless, yet the Princess, who has been absent at many events due to 'health issues' seemed serious as she posed for photos. Charlene posed with guests at the Palace in Monaco looking serene yet flawless in an all-black ensemble and silver jewelry  In photos posted on Instagram by the Palais Princier de Monaco Instagram account, Charlene posed with her husband and guests in the gardens.  The caption read: 'LL.AA.SS. Prince Albert and Princess Charlene received, in the gardens of the Prince's Palace, some guests of the Van Cleef & Arpels House for a cocktail. 'On this occasion the guests were able to discover the new Alhambra...
    The House passed a bill 219-210 to codify the right to an abortion on Friday and passed one 223-205 to ensure women can travel across state lines to get the procedure if necessary. Every Republican voted against the 2022 Women's Health Protection Act to codify abortion rights, and every Democrat except Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, voted for the bill.  The House voted to pass the Ensuring Access to Abortion Act, which would enshrine protections for interstate abortions, with three Republicans joining all Democrats in voting yes.  Neither bill is expected to go anywhere in the Senate.  The House first passed an updated version of the Women's Health Protection Act (WHPA) after first passing the measure in February. The bill failed the Senate 51-49 in a procedural vote in May.  The bill would have needed 60 votes, 10 from Republicans, to pass, but failed to garner even a simple majority as Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., voted against it, as did pro-choice Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski, Alaska, and Susan Collins, Maine.  Congress has faced increasing heat to act on abortion rights after the...
    The House on Friday again passed the Women’s Health Protection Act, a sweeping abortion rights bill that has already been passed by the chamber this Congress. It goes on to face dim prospects in the Senate. NO CLEAR PATH FOR DEMOCRATS’ SWEEPING ABORTION RIGHTS BILL AFTER DOBBS DECISION Speaker Nancy Pelosi touted the House’s second passage of the same bill this Congress, and argued the matter is an election issue to pass the bill in the Senate. “We must ensure that the American people remember in November because with two more Democratic senators, we will be able to eliminate the filibuster when it comes to a woman’s right to choose, and to make reproductive freedom the law of the land,” Pelosi said. The measure passed 219-210, mostly along party lines. In response to the Supreme Court’s decision last month in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization that struck down the high court’s nearly 50-year-old ruling in Roe v. Wade, Pelosi said the House would again take up the Women’s Health Protection Act,...
    Put the keg away. People under 40 years old should never consume alcohol as it provides them no health benefits while increasing their risk of injury and death, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of Washington, in Seattle, found that people under 40 who drink are more likely to be injured in a car accident, suicide or murder than their peers that avoid alcohol. There could be some benefit to drinking for people over 40, though, as a glass of red wine each day could help reduce the risk of developing heart disease, stroke or diabetes. According to most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 66 percent of adults in the U.S. consume alcohol every year, and five percent are heavy drinkers. Researchers found that people under the age 40 do not have anything to benefit from drinking, and should avoid it entirely if possible (file photo) 'Our message is simple: young people should not drink, but older people may benefit from drinking small amounts,' Dr Emmanuela Gakidou said in a statement. Researchers,...
    Two of America's top health agencies are reportedly hemorrhaging staff as decisions described as 'bad science' has led to bad morale within their ranks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are both suffering because of poor decision making by leadership - leaving both agencies short-staffed, reports Dr Marty Makary, a top public health expert at Johns Hopkins University in Common Sense. Major decisions made by the agencies that hurt morale included support for masking in schools, school closures during the pandemic and the authorization of COVID-19 vaccines for children aged four and under. Both agencies, along with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have been mired in controversy throughout the pandemic for inconsistent messaging and for decision making that did not seen to line up with available science. The CDC and NIH are reportedly facing staffing issues after low morale and poor decision making from leadership led to many leaving the agencies, Common Sense reports RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Biden-touted Covid drug Paxlovid is NOT...