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    As inflation soars and Americans are left with less expendable income, the low U.S. labor participation rate combined with high unemployment compounds the problem to the point it may in fact endanger national security, Fox Business host Mike Rowe said Thursday on "Tucker Carlson Tonight." Rowe, founder of the MikeRoweWORKS foundation based out of his hometown of Baltimore, as well as the acclaimed host of "Dirty Jobs" and "Deadliest Catch", said that the government's disincentivizing of work and incentivizing of idleness goes "right to our identity as a people." Video"This is no longer a matter of a skills gap or a few million people unemployed and employers frustrated because of the mismatching skills," said Rowe, who often advocates for Americans to pursue jobs in the trades, where there has long been a shortage, "This is a matter of national security." "When I started that foundation MikeRoweWORKS, 13 years ago on Labor Day, we had record-high unemployment. Every morning I woke up. I was shooting ‘Dirty Jobs’ and I would look at the headlines in the paper and it was...
    By PAUL WISEMAN, AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose last week to 770,000, a sign that layoffs remain high even as much of the U.S. economy is steadily recovering from the coronavirus recession. Thursday's report from the Labor Department showed that jobless claims climbed from 725,000 the week before. The numbers have dropped sharply since the depths of the recession last spring but still show that employers in some industries continue to lay off workers. Before the pandemic struck, applications for unemployment aid had never topped 700,000 in any one week. The four-week average of claims, which smooths out weekly variations, dropped to 746,000, the lowest since late November. A total of 4.1 million people are continuing to collect traditional state unemployment benefits, down 18,000 from the previous week. Including separate federal programs that are intended to help workers displaced by the health crisis, 18.2 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid in the week of Feb. 27, down by 1.9 million from the week before. The continuing layoffs are...
    WASHINGTON -- The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose last week to 770,000, a sign that layoffs remain high even as much of the U.S. economy is steadily recovering from the coronavirus recession.Thursday's report from the Labor Department showed that jobless claims climbed from 725,000 the week before. The numbers have dropped sharply since the depths of the recession last spring but still show that employers in some industries continue to lay off workers. Before the pandemic struck, applications for unemployment aid had never topped 700,000 in any one week.The four-week average of claims, which smooths out weekly variations, dropped to 746,000, the lowest since late November.A total of 4.1 million people are continuing to collect traditional state unemployment benefits, down 18,000 from the previous week. Including separate federal programs that are intended to help workers displaced by the health crisis, 18.2 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid in the week of Feb. 27, down by 1.9 million from the week before.EMBED More News Videos President Joe Biden and his top messengers are touring the country...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose last week to 770,000, a sign that layoffs remain high even as much of the U.S. economy is steadily recovering from the coronavirus recession. Thursday’s report from the Labor Department showed that jobless claims climbed from 725,000 the week before. The numbers have dropped sharply since the depths of the recession last spring but still show that employers in some industries continue to lay off workers. Before the pandemic struck, applications for unemployment aid had never topped 700,000 in any one week. The four-week average of claims, which smooths out weekly variations, dropped to 746,000, the lowest since late November. A total of 4.1 million people are continuing to collect traditional state unemployment benefits, down 18,000 from the previous week. Including separate federal programs that are intended to help workers displaced by the health crisis, 18.2 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid in the week of Feb. 27, down by 1.9 million from the week before. The continuing layoffs are occurring even as the overall job...
    WASHINGTON -- The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell sharply last week but remained high by historical standards.Applications for benefits declined 111,000 from the previous week to a seasonally adjusted 730,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. It is the lowest figure since late November. Still, before the virus erupted in the United States last March, weekly applications for unemployment benefits had never topped 700,000, even during the Great Recession of 2008-2009.The latest figures come as the job market has made scant progress in the past three months. Hiring averaged just 29,000 a month from November through January. Though the unemployment rate was 6.3% in January, a broader measure that includes people who have given up on their job searches is closer to 10%.All told, 19 million people were receiving unemployment aid as of Feb. 6, up from 18.3 million the previous week. About three-quarters of those recipients are receiving checks from federal benefit programs, including programs that provide jobless aid beyond the 26 weeks given by most states.Key sectors of the economy, though, are showing signs of picking up...
    WASHINGTON -- The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits fell slightly last week to 793,000, evidence that job cuts remain high despite a substantial decline in new viral infections.Last week's total declined from 812,000 the previous week, the Labor Department said Thursday. That figure was revised higher from the previously-reported figure of 779,000. Before the virus erupted in the United States in March, weekly applications for jobless aid had never topped 700,000, even during the Great Recession.The job market's improvement slowed through the fall and in the past two months has essentially stalled. Over the past two months combined, employers have cut 178,000 jobs. Nearly 10 million jobs remain lost to the pandemic.Though the unemployment rate fell in January to 6.3% from 6.7%, that was mainly because many people who had lost jobs stopped looking for one. The government doesn't count people as unemployed unless they're actively seeking work.All told, 20.4 million people were receiving unemployment benefits in the week that ended Jan. 23, the latest period for which data are available. That's up from 17.8 million from the week...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — A second wave in coronavirus cases has now been followed by a second wave in job cuts. Unemployment claims rose 38 percent last week from the week before, with an additional 73,515 people applying for help. Overall, since March, 2 million people in Illinois have applied for unemployment help. As CBS 2 Political Investigator Dana Kozlov reported, Gov. JB Pritzker said the state’s unemployment system is working better than before. But can it handle another spike in claims – especially when more than 100,000 people who filed over the past seven months are still waiting? We are still hearing from at least a dozen people a week who are still trying to get unemployment benefits. Kozlov had the story of another on Thursday evening. “I sit in my house and cry,” said one woman named Lisa. Lisa is 58 years old. She has been out of work since April, and her battle with the state to get unemployment benefits for which she is qualified has led her to desperate measures. “I receive food stamps,” she said. “I...
    In normal times, more than 3 million people use transit each day to get to work in the New York region. Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images With the unprecedented mental health and financial burdens of 2020, it's not surprising that crime is climbing in New York City.  Criminal justice reform advocates told Insider that shutdowns have left people living in poverty financially struggling and without access to mental health resources.  When people can't get the treatment they need, they might self-medicate with drugs or alcohol, which can contribute to crime, one expert said. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Poverty and untreated mental health issues are both inextricably linked to crime.  So it shouldn't come as a surprise that in 2020, an unprecedented year for both of those struggles, that crime is up in New York City, criminal justice reform advocates say. As of Sunday, New York City has seen the number of shooting victims double from the same time period in 2020, according to NYPD statistics. The number of murders has also increased by more than 30%.  Crime...
    Jazz hope stars align in Game 2 vs. Nuggets Fall Candles Thatll Make Your Home Feel Cozier Than Ever S&P 500 closes with a record high, erasing all losses since the pandemic hit Stocks roared past their all-time record highs on Tuesday, powered by rising tech shares and robust quarterly earnings from power house retailers such as Walmart and Home Depot. © Provided by NBC News The S&P 500 index closed with a record high of 3389 on Tuesday, erasing all losses since the coronavirus pandemic took hold. The Nasdaq Composite also closed with a new record high, topping 11,210. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed slightly down, at 27,778. Load Error The soaring stock market comes despite an unemployment rate of 10.2 percent and a Main Street economy that continues to be ravaged by the pandemic. Even as many business owners struggle to keep their doors open and employees paid, segments of the tech sector and big-box retail are thriving in spite — or because — of the constraints COVID-19 has put on consumers. President Donald Trump...
    Some Illinoisans are getting back to work, but for others, the process has been too slow. The Illinois Department of Employment Security reported Thursday the state's unemployment rate fell to 14.6 percent, down from 15.3 percent in May. Non-farm payrolls added nearly 143-thousand jobs in June, a record monthly increase. The three industry sectors with the largest gains in employment were leisure and hospitality, trade transportation and utilities, and education and health services. Orphe Divounguy, the chief economist with the Illinois Policy Institute, said Illinois is far behind other Midwestern states in terms of getting people off the sidelines and back to work. “Illinois has suffered three months of the region’s worst employment outcomes amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, causing us to fall farther and farther behind our neighbors,” Divounguy said. “Illinois’ businesses are diverse, and they need more specific plans allowing them to operate at the best of their abilities given the current crisis and associated lockdown.” IPI noted the number of idled workers continuing to need unemployment assistance has remained virtually stagnant since mid-April,...
    The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits dipped last week, while the number of applications for self-employment aid kept rising, the Labor Department said Thursday. The figures are a stark reminder that millions remain out of work even as businesses reopen. Some 1.3 million Americans filed for initial unemployment benefits in the week ending July 4, a drop of 99,000 from the previous week. Another 1 million filed for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, a new federal program for self-employed and gig workers. That figure has been steadily increasing since early June. While the number of people filing for jobless aid has declined every week since peaking in mid-March, the drop has been slower than economists would like. Applications for jobless aid have surpassed 1 million for four months straight, with claims more than twice as high as the worst week during the Great Recession. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox A resurgence of confirmed viral cases is also threatening to derail what had looked like the start of an economic recovery. Six states — Arizona, California,...
    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government will provide its latest report Thursday on the layoffs that have left millions unemployed and have remained high even as many businesses have reopened and rehired some laid-off workers.The weekly toll of job cuts has steadily declined since the coronavirus first struck hard in March, forcing business closures and tipping the economy into recession. But last week's report on applications for jobless aid showed that the pace of decline had stalled at a high level, evidence that many companies are still shedding workers.EMBED More News Videos What are your rights if you're a furloughed worker? Here's what you can and cannot do. Now, a sudden resurgence of COVID-19 cases is threatening to derail what had looked like the start of an economic recovery.In May, employers added 2.5 million jobs, and the unemployment rate fell from 14.7% to a still-high 13.3%. But the economy and the job market may struggle to sustain their recent gains amid the surge in new viral infections, which could cause a new round of business shutdowns.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Employers added jobs in 46 states last month, evidence that the U.S. economy’s surprise hiring gain in May was spread broadly across the country — in both states that began reopening their economies early and those that did so only later. Unemployment rates fell in 38 states, rose in three and were largely unchanged in nine, the Labor Department said Friday. The disparities ranged from Nevada, with the highest rate (25.3%), Hawaii (22.6%) and Michigan (21.2%) to Nebraska (5.2%, the lowest) and Utah (8.5%). The overall U.S. unemployment rate in May was a still-high 13.3%, a decline from 14.7% in April. All told, the figures illustrate the unusually broad nature of the recession, with all states enduring unemployment rates that soared in April as the coronavirus forced business closures and then generally fell but remained painfully high in May. During the 2008-2009 Great Recession, by contrast, some Midwestern and Plains states such as Iowa and North Dakota managed to avoid high unemployment. Yet in May, Iowa’s unemployment rate was a high 10%...
    WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S. unemployment rate fell unexpectedly in May to 13.3% - still on par with what the nation witnessed during the Great Depression - as states loosened their coronavirus lockdowns and businesses began recalling workers. The government said Friday that the economy added 2.5 million jobs last month, driving unemployment down from 14.7% in April. The May job gain, which confounded economists’ expectations of another round of severe losses, suggests that thousands of stores, restaurants, gyms and other companies reopened and rehired more quickly than many analysts had forecast. TOP STORIES Oregon journalist Andy Ngo sues Antifa for $900,000 for campaign of terror Richmond police chief says rioters blocked firefighters from burning home with child inside Van Jones: Forget the KKK, its the white, liberal Hillary Clinton supporter we should worry about Still, it raises a key question for businesses and unemployed workers: How fast will the rebound proceed? For hiring to continue at a solid pace, businesses will probably need to see signs that consumers are starting to resume their pre-outbreak habits of shopping...
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