Monday, Aug 08, 2022 - 09:33:34
38 results - (0.004 seconds)

obesity could:

latest news at page 1:
1
    COLD showers could help obese people lose weight, a study suggests. Research found being in 4C temperatures improves metabolism — meaning TV Iceman Wim Hof, 63, may be on to something with his extreme dips. 1Cold showers could help obese people lose weight, study findsCredit: Getty - Contributor Researchers fed mice a high-fat Western diet. Some of the overweight rodents were exposed to around 4C while others were kept at a temperature where the body does not need to produce heat. The boffins found being in the cold helped obesity-induced inflammation and imporoved the body’s use of blood glucose reducing blood sugar. The mice’s weight dropped compared to those not in the cold. READ MORE HEALTH NEWSCASE LOAD Monkeypox cases jump by 14% with 1,235 detected as health chiefs issue warningGREEN FINGERS Urgent warning to gardeners as soil ‘increases risk of killer heart disease’ The Boston, US, study was published in Nature Metabolism journal. Prof Yu-Hua Tseng said: “Cold exposure reduced inflammation and improved metabolism in obesity.” Most read in Health NewsHIGH ALERT Warning to anyone attending mass gatherings this...
    Exercise's appetite-suppressing benefits may be redeemed simply by swallowing a pill in the future.  For researchers have discovered an 'anti-hunger' molecule, seemingly produced by strenuous work-outs. Fat mice given the hunger-suppressing compound, called lac-phe, voluntarily ate 30 per cent less.  Tests showed this led to the rodents weighing less, carrying less body fat and being better able to tolerate glucose — which academics said was 'indicative of a reversal of diabetes'. Exercise's appetite-suppressing benefits may be redeemed simply by swallowing a pill in the future Graph shows: The bodyweight of mice given the chemical daily (red) compared to those given a control (blue) over ten days Graph shows: The amount of food eaten by mice given the chemical daily (red) compared to those given a control (blue) over ten days Graph shows: The amount of food eaten by mice given the chemical (red) compared to those given a control (blue) in the 12 hours after an injection Dr Yong Xu, a pediatrician at the Baylor College of Medicine in Texas, said his study could pave the way for a...
    Weighing young children in an attempt to reduce obesity could end up making them fatter, a psychologist has claimed. Dr Angela Meadows, a psychology lecturer at the University of Essex, appeared on Good Morning Britain today, alongside Tam Fry, chair of the National Obesity Forum to debate the issue.  Tam Fry, who believes weighing very young people could help tackle obesity, said the 'object of the exercise is to catch the early signs' that a child is heading towards obesity, in a 'preventative not curative manner'. However Dr Meadows argued that when young people are told they are too heavy, they often engage in weight controlling behaviours.    'And all of the evidence shows that the most common outcome of dieting is weight gain,' she said. 'So when that doesn't work, then they start trying more severe things.'  Dr Angela Meadows, a psychologist at the University of Essex, argued that weighing children can lead to weight gain and harmful attempts at weight loss However the National Obesity Forum's chair Tam Fry said that preventative - rather than curative - weighing could help...
    BLOKES with a spare tyre around their waist are significantly more likely to die of prostate cancer, a major study reveals. It found that every extra four inches around the middle raises risk by seven per cent. 1Men with more of a waist are more at risk of developing cancerCredit: Getty Oxford University experts said the results are the first proof that a bulging gut is bad news for the disease. Experts calculate there would be 1,300 fewer annual prostate cancer deaths if the average weight of a British bloke fell by five units of BMI. For a 5’ 10” man it equates to losing around two-and-a-half stone. One theory is that a large waistline makes prostate cancer harder to detect, meaning cases are picked up later when they are harder to treat. Read more on cancerRED FLAG Warning to millions over killer cancer symptom that most Brits haven't heard ofNEED TO KNOW Everything you need to know about where the prostate is and what it does Being tubby is known to trigger inflammation that could fuel the cancer, while...
    Women who are overweight before they get pregnant are more likely to have children with asthma, a study has suggested. Mothers who were obese before conceiving were 28 per cent more likely to have a child diagnosed with asthma before the age of three, Japanese researchers found. Women who were overweight were also 17 per cent more likely to have a young child with asthma compared with those of a healthy weight. Some experts have suggested this may be because overweight women produce more of a hormone called leptin, which may make the airways of their unborn child more sensitive. Co-author Dr Emiko Noguchi, from the University of Tsukuba, said: ‘[These findings] matter because asthma is often a lifelong condition which can disrupt everyday life.’ Women who are overweight before they get pregnant are more likely to have a child with asthma, Japanese researchers have found Asthma is the most common long-term condition among children in the UK, affecting around one in 11 young people. The study, of more than 67,000 women, was published in the Journal of Allergy and...
    OBESITY could be cured by turning off "hungry hormone" without dieting or exercise as the NHS launched a radical trial. The process would cut the desire to over-eat and reduce weight in just 40 minutes and would cost the NHS £1,500 – a quarter of the price of normal fat-loss surgery. 3People with obesity could turn off their "hungry hormone" through a procedure called bariatric embolisationCredit: Getty Images A trial, led by Ahmed R. Ahmed, a bariatric surgeon at London's St Mary's Hospital, will see nearly 80 volunteers go through the procedure called bariatric embolisation and have their ghrelin turned off, which is nicknamed the 'hungry hormone'. Due to expense and logistics, the NHS performs 6,000 bariatric procedures such as gastric bands, bypasses and sleeves a year, leading to long waiting lists. Speaking to the MailOnline, Mr Ahmed said that if bariatric embolisation became routine, patients could be out of hospital in two hours. "You could go in hungry and come out not hungry," he said. The doctor said the method's fast speed and low cost would...
    BEING overweight can increase a person’s chances of surviving some deadly illnesses, a study has revealed. Those with a bigger waistline were less likely to die from severe bacterial infections, it found. 1A study revealed that being overweight could increase survival rate of some deadly illnesses, including severe bacterial infectionsCredit: Getty A study of 2,196 such patients found 26 per cent with “normal” weight died within a year, compared to nine and 17 per cent in higher BMI groups. Study author Dr Asa Alsio, of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, said: “In most diseases, obesity and being overweight is disadvantageous. "This applies to several types of cancer, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, Covid-19, in which a higher BMI is associated with higher mortality. "Paradoxically, it’s the other way round here.” Obesity affects around one in four adults and one in five children aged 10 to 11 in the UK, according to the NHS. Co-author Dr Gunnar Jacobsson added: "More knowledge is needed to shed light on how body weight affects the body's defences against infection so that treatment...
    A new weight-loss treatment that makes mice 'sweat' out fat has been discovered by scientists — who say it could even be used on humans to tackle obesity. Researchers found it is possible to induce stomach fat loss by targeting the immune system, although the knock-on effect is greasy hair. They made the discovery after treating mice with the cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) — a type of immune system protein — which led to significant fat and weight loss.  Scroll down for video  A new weight-loss treatment that makes mice 'sweat' out fat has been discovered by scientists — who say it could even be used on humans to tackle obesity (stock image)  WHAT IS THE CYTOKINE TSLP AND HOW MIGHT IT HELP WITH WEIGHT LOSS? Researchers treated mice with the cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) — a type of immune system protein which is involved in asthma and other allergic diseases. They found that it led to significant fat and weight loss but it was not caused by a decreased food intake or faster metabolism. Instead it was because...
    “IT’S in my genes” is a legitimate excuse for some people who struggle to lose weight, research shows. Scientists have found genes protect people from obesity - and it’s bad luck if you don’t have them. 1If you struggle to lose weight you may have genes stopping youCredit: Getty Extensive genetic testing of more than 645,000 people in the UK and US found 16 rare variations that influence BMI, a metric of measuring weight. One of the genes, called GPR75, was studied further. Every person has two copies of each gene, one inherited from each parent. In the study, people with only one copy of the GPR75 gene weighed about 12 pounds (5.3kg) less. They faced a 54 per cent lower risk of obesity than those without the mutation, and had a lower BMI. But the study suggested just four in every 10,000 people have this genetic “superpower”, according to the paper published in the journal Science. Some of the genes in the study have never been found before. But "lean genes" have already been discovered previously, as well as...
    There are many weight loss myths circulating around social media that may be harmful to your health and weight loss goals. JGI/Tom Grill/ Getty Images Semaglutide, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes, is emerging as a potential obesity treatment.  Evidence suggests it can help people lose weight by suppressing appetite, as long as they keep taking it. While recorded side effects are minor, some experts are skeptical about long-term safety and limitations.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Semaglutide, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes , is being tested to help people with obesity lose weight , and some doctors have called it a "game changer." The medication can help balance out hormones like insulin, which may curb appetite and allow people to shed pounds by eating less. While side effects are typically mild, some experts are concerned about the safety of its long-term use.  Patients can lose significant weight on semaglutide because it suppresses appetiteSemaglutide can be taken orally or by injection, according to Novo Nordisk, and it works by increasing the production...
    A WONDER jab that stops food cravings could soon help people lose weight. People given the jab in a study rapidly dropped the pounds and ate less buffet food because their appetite was suppressed. 1People given a weekly dose of semaglutide had a lower appetite and cravings for foodCredit: Alamy If approved for use by medicine regulators, it could be a game-changer for people who can't fight the flab - and the obesity crisis. Almost one in three adults in England are obese, with a further third overweight. More than 650 million people worldwide are obese, which can increase the risk for heartdisease, type 2 diabetes and more. Obesity rates show no sign of slowing down unless urgent action is taken to find new solutions. The latest drug under the microscope is called semaglutide, which induces weight loss by reducing hunger, increasing feeling of fullness and thereby helping people eat less. Drug company Novo Nordisk recruited 72 obese adults aged 18 to 65 whose BMI - one measurement of obesity - was above 30.. Half the participants were...
    A weight-loss 'wonder-drug' cuts calorie intake by more than a third and suppresses appetite and cravings, a study has revealed. Patients given the weekly jab lost a tenth of their body weight in just 20 weeks – 25 times more than those on a placebo. They reported fewer hunger-pangs, felt fuller faster and ate 35 per cent fewer calories when offered an unlimited free lunch. Experts say the drug, named semaglutide, could play a major role in combating the nation's obesity crisis. It is already used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and works by hijacking the body's appetite-regulating system. A month's supply costs around £73. A weight-loss 'wonder-drug' cuts calorie intake by more than a third and suppresses appetite and cravings, a study has revealed RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Pubs will NOT be forced to list calories on booze!... Children eat most sugar at home as study finds breakfast... Share this article Share Researchers from drug firm Novo Nordisk analysed data on 72 obese adults aged 18 to...
    Kris Connor/Getty Images Jillian Michaels is urging people to use diet and exercise for weight loss instead of medication.  The drug semaglutide has promising results for treating obesity, but is still being researched. Michaels' comments perpetuate dangerous myths about obesity, according to experts. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Celebrity fitness guru Jillian Michaels is speaking out against a promising new obesity medication, saying that lifestyle changes are a better method of weight loss with fewer side effects. Michaels, who rose to fame as a trainer on the controversial weight loss reality show "The Biggest Loser," argues that the drug may have unforeseen side effects and the weight loss results aren't sustainable. The medication semaglutide was found in a recent to study to help people with obesity lose about 15% of their weight in 68 weeks.  "These results are not game-changing," Michaels said in a video posted to Instagram. "What's game changing is exercise and proper nutrition."  A post shared by Jillian Michaels (@jillianmichaels) Experts told Insider that Michaels is also perpetuating misconceptions about...
    OVERWEIGHT Brits will be paid to exercise under plans being considered by the Government. The bold strategy will be part of a drive to slash obesity rates in the UK - blamed for fuelling Covid deaths. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 4Obese Brits may be paid to exercise under plans being considered by the GovernmentCredit: Alamy Sir Keith Mills, who founded the Air Miles and Nectar customer loyalty programmes, will be advising the Government on reward incentives. Part of his work will include looking at schemes from around the world which have been successful in getting people fit and eating better. This includes the step challenge in Singapore, a nationwide physical activity programme aimed at encouraging people to do more physical activity with financial incentives. It will come on top of the introduction of free fat-fighting classes - offered to 700,000 Brits - as part of a £100 million package pledged by the PM to help the nation slim down. Tubby adults will be able to access diet apps and weight-loss plans. More than...
    Fox News medical contributor Dr. Marc Siegel blasted the Biden administration Thursday for allowing public school shutdowns in the U.S. to continue as students struggle to stay afloat at home. Siegel cited a recent Fox News report detailing an uptick in children's weight due to pandemic-related difficulties, including disrupted sleep cycles and too much time sitting idly during virtual learning. "Playgrounds are closed. Children are in front of computer screens, if they even have a computer," Siegel told "Fox News Primetime" host Rachel Campos-Duffy. "They are doing binge eating. They are doing comfort food snacking. There's nobody there to remind them of anything. There's no fruits or vegetables." Siegel blamed school closures for disrupted sleep cycles and a decline in activity tied to virtual learning, specifically among kids battling obesity and high blood pressure.  KIDS' WEIGHT GAIN TIED TO IDLE VIRTUAL LEARNING "One out of three children in the United States are overweight or obese to begin with," he said. "When we have this situation, we have a growing amount of depression. We have 25% increase in visits for mental health emergencies from children, not to mention all the anxiety and all the depression. It all comes from lack of exercise, not sleeping right, not getting to see your friends or talk to...
    The coronavirus pandemic is predicted to make childhood obesity worse as many children are still learning remotely and have reduced opportunities to exercise outside and an increasing reliance on processed food, reports The Counter.   The childhood obesity rate was already at an all-time high at 19 percent before the pandemic, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, and in July the medical journal Obesity published a letter predicting an increase of 4.25 percentage points after five months of COVID-19 school closures. Schools in many states are still operating remotely and many don’t anticipate returning until next fall. "Its certainly very likely that these two crises, the childhood obesity epidemic and the COVID pandemic, are intersecting in many ways," Jamie Bussel, a senior program officer for childrens health at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, told Axios. There are myriad reasons for the anticipated rise in rates: schools have been handing out more processed, frozen shelf-stable foods to children who receive school lunches due to delivery logistics and staffing shortages and gym classes and commuting to school are non-existent, leading to...
    Avoiding your nighttime meal could potentially mean extra pounds in the long run, a new study published in the peer-reviewed Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute suggests. Multiple researchers at Osaka University observed health records from 17,573 male and 8,860 female students (age 18 and older) over the course of three years and found that study participants who regularly skipped dinner were likely to gain weight or be overweight. Dinner skipping was found to be the main commonality among 10.8% of the male study participants who gained weight and the 17.1% of the female study participants who gained weight. Ditching dinner was more “associated with overweight/obesity in men and women, respectively” than breakfast and lunch did, according to the study’s findings. For the male and female participants who gained weight during the study, a significant number were said to likely be older, more overweight, sleep less, drink or smoke more and skip other meals more frequently than those who ate dinner on a regular basis. Unlike their female counterparts, the male students who gained weight were also likely eat dinner later...
    Eating dinner could help you stay a healthy weight. Getty Skipping dinner might make you more likely to gain weight, according to a new, large-scale study. Researchers from Osaka University concluded that not eating dinner is a "significant predictor of weight gain" and being overweight or obese. Those who skipped dinner all the time or occasionally were more likely to be older, more overweight, a smoker or drinker, and to sleep for a shorter period of time. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A new large-scale study suggests that skipping dinner could result in weight gain and a higher likelihood of being overweight or obese.  For years, research has linked skipping breakfast with increased BMI (body mass index), but few studies have been carried out into the effect of the other meals of the day.  However, researchers at Osaka University, whose study assessed breakfast, lunch, and dinner habits, concluded that not eating dinner is a "significant predictor of weight gain and overweight/obesity." The study followed 17,573 male and 8,860 female students over the age of 18 enrolled...
    A centimeter-sized device is poised to help those struggling with obesity. Researchers from Texas A&M University unveiled new technology that provides the feeling of fullness by stimulating nerve endings responsible for the regulation of food intake. Unlike other devices that require a power cord, this device is wireless and can be controlled externally from a remote radio frequency source. The paddle-shaped system is fastened to the stomach and comprised of a microchips and LEDs that release light to target specific vagus nerve endings. When the radio frequency source was switched on, the researchers showed that the light from the LEDs was effective at suppressing hunger. A centimeter-sized device is poised to help those struggling with obesity. Researchers from Texas A&M University unveiled new technology that provides the feeling of fullness by stimulating nerve endings responsible for the regulation of food intake Obesity is deemed a global epidemic with more than 650 million people worldwide suffering from the excessive weight. Those suffering with obesity turn to diets and exercise that tend to fail, resulting in taking the drastic step of...
    Scientists in Ireland believe they found a bacteria that may counter the effects of obesity. The new study was published on Friday and was conducted by the APC Microbiome Ireland SFI Research Centre, which investigated whether the gut bacteria Bifidobacterium longum APC1472 has “anti-obesity effects” in high-fat diets. Bacteria B. longum APC1472 was administered to 6 high-fat diet fed mice through drinking water for 16 weeks and an unspecified number of human participants for 12 weeks. Researchers found that the bacteria was “associated with decreased bodyweight, fat depots accumulation and increased glucose tolerance” in the mice, but “did not change primary outcomes of BMI or [waist-to-hip] ratio” in healthy overweight and obese humans. Although human participants did not have pronounced change in their appearance, researchers did find that B. longum APC1472 had a “positive effect on the secondary outcome of fasting blood glucose levels.” In other words, the bacteria allegedly shows promise as a potential supplement for reducing certain obesity markers such as high blood sugar levels in the morning, a common issue for diabetics. Other trends researchers observed in obese human participants given...
    Scientists in Ireland believe they found a bacteria that may counter the effects of obesity. The new study was published on Friday and was conducted by the APC Microbiome Ireland SFI Research Centre, which investigated whether the gut bacteria Bifidobacterium longum APC1472 has "anti-obesity effects" in high-fat diets. MAJORITY OF AMERICANS ADMIT TO WEIGHT GAIN DURING CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC, PLAN TO SHED POUNDS IN 2021 Bacteria B. longum APC1472 was administered to 6 high-fat diet fed mice through drinking water for 16 weeks and an unspecified number of human participants for 12 weeks. Researchers found that the bacteria was "associated with decreased bodyweight, fat depots accumulation and increased glucose tolerance" in the mice, but "did not change primary outcomes of BMI or [waist-to-hip] ratio" in healthy overweight and obese humans. PLANT-BASED 'GREEN' MEDITERRANEAN DIET LEADS TO MORE WEIGHT LOSS: STUDY Although human participants did not have pronounced change in their appearance, researchers did find that B. longum APC1472 had a "positive effect on the secondary outcome of fasting blood glucose levels." Bifidobacterium longum APC1472 is a gut bacteria that could...
    Share Tweet Share Share E-mail Marta González has a diploma in Dietetics and Human Nutrition (CESNID), with an official master’s degree in Nutrition and Health (UOC). Teacher since 2003, disseminator on food, nursing and food hygiene issues and collaborator in health magazines and editorials. Childhood obesity has become a real public health problem, worldwide. How do you see this situation that has developed in the world, in general, and in Spain, in particular? Obesity is a true epidemic, it constitutes one of the most serious global public health problems of the 21st century. It is affecting all countries, especially in urban areas, with a prevalence that is increasing at a dizzying and alarming rate. The growth of childhood obesity has been spectacular in the most disadvantaged regions, according to the WHO, in Africa it has gone from a total of 4 million children with overweight or obesity to a total of 9 million. In developing countries with emerging economies, the current prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity among the preschool-age population already exceeds 30%. Spain...
    (CNN) — The news about cancer is good for now, but the future doesn’t look as bright, according to a report published this week by the American Association for Cancer Research. Progress in cancer care The AACR Cancer Progress Report 2020 found the number of cancer survivors living in the United States has reached a record high, with more than 16.9 million survivors, according to the report. The US cancer death rate fell by 29% from 1991 to 2017. That’s about 2.9 million lives saved, the report said. Since August 2019, the US Food and Drug Administration has also approved a record number of treatments. Thirty-five were approved between August 2019 and July 31 of this year, several of the treatments are for cancer types that have not had many, or any, options. Dr. Antoni Ribas said he has personally seen this improvement in care in his own oncology practice. Ten years ago, only one in five patients with metastatic melanoma would have benefited from treatments. Today, half of his patients with this kind of cancer benefit from existing treatments. “Even though we have...
    (CNN)The news about cancer is good for now, but the future doesn't look as bright, according to a report published this week by the American Association for Cancer Research.Progress in cancer careThe AACR Cancer Progress Report 2020 found the number of cancer survivors living in the United States has reached a record high, with more than 16.9 million survivors, according to the report. The US cancer death rate fell by 29% from 1991 to 2017. That's about 2.9 million lives saved, the report said.FDA must do more to regulate thousands of chemicals added to your food, petitioners saySince August 2019, the US Food and Drug Administration has also approved a record number of treatments. Thirty-five were approved between August 2019 and July 31 of this year, several of the treatments are for cancer types that have not had many, or any, options.Read MoreDr. Antoni Ribas said he has personally seen this improvement in care in his own oncology practice. Ten years ago, only one in five patients with metastatic melanoma would have benefited from treatments. Today, half of his patients...
    Probiotics found in yoghurt drinks could reduce childhood obesity and the risk of developing serious diseases like type 2 diabetes, scientists have revealed.  The study compared 100 obese children aged between six and 18 who were either put on a standard calorie-restricted diet or one that included probiotics. After monitoring the children for eight weeks, scientists found that those on the diet including probiotics lost more weight and had improved insulin sensitivity, reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease.  The supplements contained Bifidobacteriums, which break down carbohydrates and fibres in the human gut. They also release chemicals called short-chain fatty acids, which play an important role in gut health and controlling hunger. It is thought that digestion is impaired when they are present in low numbers. Probiotics found in yoghurt drinks could reduce childhood obesity and improve insulin sensitivity, cutting the risk of type 2 diabetes, a study has found Dr Flavia Prodam and her team at the University of Piemonte Orientale, Italy, conducted the study to assess the impact of Bifidobacteria on children with obesity. ...
    Most Saturday nights, former eye surgeons Dr Paul Barrington Chell and Dr Monique Hope-Ross sit down to a full curry banquet with poppadoms, onion bhajis and naan bread. The feast at the kitchen table in their timber-framed Warwickshire house will be washed down with a bottle of fine red wine. The next morning they might fry up a substantial cooked breakfast of three eggs and four rashers of bacon each, plus fried cherry tomatoes and mushrooms dripping in butter. It hardly sounds like the meal plan of two health-conscious diet experts — but this married couple are convinced they have discovered a simple blueprint for long-term weight loss that allows them to enjoy hugely calorific ‘treat meals’ without gaining pounds. Now they have written a book, The Diet‑Whisperer, which sets out their radical plan. It’s all about gently nudging the hormones that govern hunger and fat storage into a super-efficient fat-burning mode which allows you to swiftly offset the evils of indulgent eating with a short period of fasting. Dr Paul Barrington Chell and Dr Monique Hope-Ross (pictured) who...
    Nurse Kath Olmstead prepares a shot as the world’s biggest study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway Monday, July 27, 2020, in Binghamton, N.Y. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink) As scientists continue to work on a COVID-19 vaccine, experts say the development may not include another widespread American health issue: obesity. READ MORE: Dr. Anthony Fauci says a coronavirus vaccine may be coming in 2021 CNN Health reports a coronavirus vaccination will likely follow the path of the shots developed for influenza, hepatitis B, tetanus and rabies in being less effective in obese adults. In turn, it will leave them more vulnerable to infection and illness. A health care worker works at a COVID-19 testing site sponsored by Community Heath of South Florida at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Clinica Campesina Health Center, during the coronavirus pandemic, Monday, July 6, 2020, in Homestead, Fla. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky) “Will we have a COVID vaccine next year tailored to the obese? No way,” says Raz Shaikh, to CNN. The associate...
    Share Tweet Share Share E-mail Circadian rhythms, which people sometimes refer to as the “body clock”, regulate sleep patterns, alertness, temperature and blood pressure, Inter alia. These daily biological rhythms probably evolved to coordinate with light and food availability, but they also regulate internal metabolic processes. Therefore, there is no doubt that Circadian rhythms are important for human health and experts believe that its long-term interruption has several adverse consequences. Among them, the possible effects on health include obesity and type 2 diabetes, as mounting evidence indicates a connection between circadian disruption and insulin resistance. In fact, a new study, which was published in Cell Host & Microbe, shows that diabetes is also associated with changes in the daily rhythms of the gut microbiome. In this sense, a team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich showed that people with type 2 diabetes have fewer daily fluctuations in some of their gut bacteria and that these changes can serve to predict and diagnose the condition. The rhythm of the microbiome For many years, scientists have known that the circadian...
    (Kaiser Health News)For a world crippled by the coronavirus, salvation hinges on a vaccine.But in the United States, where at least 4.6 million people have been infected and nearly 155,000 have died, the promise of that vaccine is hampered by a vexing epidemic that long preceded Covid-19: obesity.Sedentary lockdowns put kids at risk for obesity. Heres how to help them stay movingScientists know that vaccines engineered to protect the public from influenza, hepatitis B, tetanus and rabies can be less effective in obese adults than in the general population, leaving them more vulnerable to infection and illness. There is little reason to believe, obesity researchers say, that Covid-19 vaccines will be any different."Will we have a Covid vaccine next year tailored to the obese? No way," said Raz Shaikh, an associate professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill."Will it still work in the obese? Our prediction is no."Read MoreMore than 107 million American adults are obese, and their ability to return safely to work, care for their families and resume daily life could be curtailed if the...
    BEER, wine and spirits could be slapped with calorie labels in government moves to fight obesity. Boris Johnson plans a consultation later this month over putting nutritional data on all alcoholic drinks. 1Beer, wine and spirits could be slapped with calorie labels in government moves to fight obesityCredit: Getty - Contributor It could mean calorie information on bottles, cans, beer pumps and menus. Campaigners say booze is a major contributor to obesity in the UK, where two in three adults are too fat. A pint of lager contains 180 calories and a large glass of red wine has 200. The PM is looking at ways of slimming down the nation after obesity was linked to Covid-19 deaths. Research suggests the average drinker gets around ten per cent of their calorie intake from alcohol. A government source said: “This is about making it easier for people to make a healthy choice. “One idea is to introduce calorie labelling on alcoholic drinks so consumers are aware of what is in their drink.” Most read in Health NewsWarningSHEER BRUTALITYMoment teens fly kick...
    GPs should be paid extra to send 12million fat Brits to slimming classes, an NHS watchdog says. They will get the cash for each obese adult they refer to “weight management programmes” within three months of them being measured. 1Being too heavy increases the chances of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart and liver disease, and several cancersCredit: Alamy The idea is contained in proposals from the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence and revealed by GP magazine Pulse. With one in four adults obese, a body mass index over 30, it could lead to 12million people being offered help. Tam Fry, from the National Obesity Forum, welcomed plans to pay GPs. He said: “It is a move in the right direction, although the sooner GPs intervene the better. "If GPs are not incentivised they will not do it, so we need to make these extra payments.” Kent GP Dr Stephanie de Giorgio said: “There aren't the services to send them to, so that's not possible without massive investment when you think of the number of patients this...
    PEOPLE who are trying to lose weight could be prescribed Weight Watchers free on the NHS. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has vowed to tackle obesity in the UK after his brush with Covid-19 convinced him to shed the pounds. 3People could get Weight Watchers for free in a bid to tackle the obesity crisis in the UK Credit: Getty - Contributor Mr Johnson has suggested the severe symptoms he endured were partly down to his weight. It comes after various studies have flagged obesity as one of the major reisk factors for severe Covid-19 and death from the disease. Mr Johnson weighed 17 stone 7lbs when he was admitted to St Thomas’ Hospital in London with the virus in April. It is thought he has lost at least a stone since recovering. At present doctors are able to refer patients who need to lose weight to the Weight Watchers (WW) scheme if they are at risk of type 2 diabetes. Those who are referred get nine months of the plan subsidised. 3Boris Johnson is pictured in April, days after he...
    (CNN) — For older adults, your current belly size could be a key indicator in whether you develop dementia within the next decade or two. For women that risk is particularly high. For women in later adulthood, above average belly fat can lead to a 39% increased risk of dementia within 15 years compared with those who have a normal waist circumference, according to a study published Tuesday in the International Journal of Epidemiology. For men and women over 50, the dementia risk is 28% when taking body mass index and waist circumference into account together, the study said. Researchers measured participants’ height, weight and waist circumference and followed up with them an average of 11 years later to see whether they’d been diagnosed with dementia. “As belly size gets larger, the memory center in the brain gets smaller, based on prior studies,” said Dr. Richard Isaacson, who heads the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian Hospital. “This new study is important since it supports these findings and relates a larger waist size to increased dementia...
1