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    EATING fish regularly raises skin cancer risk, research suggests. U.S. experts looked at consumption and the chances of developing malignant melanoma. 1People who ate two portions of fish a week were more likely to get a skin cancer diagnosisCredit: Getty They found those who scoffed 43g of fish daily – roughly two weekly portions - were 22 per cent more likely to develop the disease than those who rarely ate any. Scientists think pollutants found in seafood could be behind the link. The NHS says a healthy diet should include two 140g helpings of oily fish (salmon, sardines or trout) each week. And other experts said there was no need to stop eating it, despite the worrying findings. Read more on melanoma LOOK OUT I’m an expert and here’s the five skin cancer red flags you need to know WORD OF WARNING My 'harmless' freckle could've killed me - don't make my mistake The study, published in the journal Cancer Causes & Control, looked at the intake of 491,367 adults. Lead researcher Eunyoung Cho, from Brown University in the U.S.,...
    The psychedelic compound found in magic mushrooms helps to open up depressed people's brains and stop them getting stuck in a negative pattern of thinking, a new study has suggested. Researchers said psilocybin – found in the mushrooms – made the brain more flexible, working differently from regular antidepressants, even weeks after use. It is not the first time the drug has been suggested as a way to tackle depression, but the authors of the latest study believe their findings indicate that it could be a real alternative approach to treatments.  They said patterns of brain activity in depression can become rigid and restricted, and psilocybin could help the brain to break out of the rut in a way traditional therapies cannot. However, the experts at Imperial College London cautioned that patients with depression should not attempt to self-medicate with psilocybin.  The psychedelic compound found in magic mushrooms helps to open up depressed people's brains and make them less fixed in negative thinking patterns, a study has suggested (stock)  HOW CAN MAGIC MUSHROOMS TREAT DEPRESSION? Psilocybin is one of several...
    They also believe they saw evidence that the deer population had contracted the virus from humans on multiple occasions. "The data [is] very consistent again with frequent spillover events from humans into deer and then transmission among the animals," said Kapur. Still unknown is whether or not humans can contract the virus back from deer, and whether other livestock can contract it from deer. The possibility of the virus mutating among the deer population is another worrying concern. "If we want to continue to be proactive about emerging variants — and not be surprised by one that suddenly pops up — there's an urgent need to continue to monitor SARS-CoV-2 in wildlife," said Kuchipudi, "especially in animals that could serve as a reservoir, like the deer." The study was conducted by testing the lymph nodes of nearly 300 white-tailed deer in Iowa.Here's more about the deer pandemic: Widespread COVID-19 infection detected in white-tailed deer in Iowa, study shows www.youtube.com
    alvarez | Getty Images Younger women are chipping away at the gender investing gap.     Nearly three-fourths of millennial women, ages 25 to 40 years old, are now investing outside their retirement accounts. Younger women are also more likely to invest for specific goals than those of other age groups.  That's according to new findings from Fidelity Investments' 2021 Women and Investing Study, which showed unprecedented growth during the pandemic. "It tells the story of a continuous thirst and interest from young women in doing more with their money," said Lorna Kapusta, head of women investors and customer engagement at Fidelity. More from Personal Finance:Women investors are still outperforming men, study findsMen tend to have higher total credit limits than female borrowersPanic sellers during stock market dips are often married men with children Indeed, two-thirds of young women see the value of investing for a specific goal, compared to 56% of young men, the new findings show. These findings come as many women's retirement savings lag behind their male counterparts. Some 60% of women worry about retirement, compared to 51% of men,...
    Researchers believe they have discovered the part of the brain that could make a person sick by storing and retrieving episodes of past illnesses, a new study suggests. The findings — led by a group of scientists at Technion-Israel Institute of Technology — were able to show that the insurlar cortex in previously health mice caused inflammation to appear. The inflammation occurred in different parts of their bodies, including the colon and abdomen.  While the induced inflammation occurred, the researchers watched the neuron activity and saw a 'chemogenetic reactivation' that was similar to what happened when the mice were inflamed previously. Researchers believe they discovered the part of the brain that could make a person sick by storing and retrieving episodes of past illnesses The researchers induced inflammation in the same regions in the mice, but only by activating the neurons that fired during the original inflammation.  The brain of the mice was storing and retrieving 'specific immune responses, extending the classical concept of immunological memory to neuronal representations of inflammatory information,' the authors wrote in the study. 'This suggests...
    Brain functions including information absorption and concentration actually improve over the age of 50, a new study claims.   Researchers examining hundreds of seniors found improvement in two key areas: Being able to absorb new information and focusing on what's important.   These functions are intrinsically tied to areas of cognition like decision-making, memory, and self-control, and even impact math, language, and reading skills and our sense of navigation.   'These results are amazing, and have important consequences for how we should view aging,' study co-author and neuroscientist Michael T. Ullman, director of Georgetown's Brain and Language Lab, said in a statement. Scroll down for video In a study of 702 participants between the ages of 58 and 98, researchers at Georgetown University Medical School examined alertness, executive inhibition (the ability to block out distractions) and orienting, defined as shifting brainpower 'to a particular location in space' The researchers analyzed three separate components of attention and executive function in the participants: The first, 'alerting,' is defined as 'a state of enhanced vigilance and preparedness in order to respond to incoming information,' according to...
    Crystal Cox/Insider Hospital visits for suspected suicide attempts rose among teens throughout the pandemic.  Teen girls were hit hardest, with rates 51% higher in February and March 2021 than the same time in 2019. Mitigation measures, isolation, and a disruption of future plans could contribute.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The pandemic has taken a dramatic toll on American teens' mental health, with rates of suspected suicide attempts rising since May 2020, new data out of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests.  Teen girls were hit especially hard. Their suicide attempt rates reached a peak in February and March of 2021, though that doesn't mean their suicide death rates increased.  The findings add to previous work showing an increase in mental-related emergency department visits among 12-to-17-year-olds during 2020. Other studies have also showed a stark increase in suicide ideation during the pandemic, particularly among young adults.  Suicide attempts among girls and women are consistently higher than those of boys and men, but "the findings from this study suggest more severe distress among young females...
    Women are twice as likely to give birth to a girl if they experienced more stress around the time of conception, a study has found. Researchers from Spain recorded the levels of the stress hormone cortisol in the hair of 108 women from around week nine of their pregnancy through to delivery. Each hair measurement covered the cortisol levels for the preceding three months — meaning the first one taken covered the period prior to and including conception. The findings confirm that foetuses are vulnerable to the effects of maternal stress and that such can play a key role in their development. Women are twice as likely to give birth to a girl if they experienced more stress around the time of conception, a study has found. Pictured: a newborn baby girl 'The results we found were surprising,' said paper author and psychologist María Isabel Peralta-Ramírez of the University of Granada. 'They showed that the women who had given birth to girls presented higher concentrations of hair cortisol in the weeks before, during, and after the point of conception than...
    Having a lie-in at the weekend when you are used to getting up early all week can affect your mood and increase the risk of depression, according to a new study. Experts from the Michigan Medicine, the University of Michigan's academic medical centre used sleep and mood data from 2,1000 early career doctors taken over a year. An irregular sleep schedule can increase the risk of depression just as much as getting fewer hours of sleep overall or staying up late regularly, they found. Sleeping in on a Sunday can even affect your Monday morning mood, they found, and make you as grumpy as you would be had you stayed up late on Sunday night.  Researchers haven't studied the affect of mixed sleep schedules on the wider population but believe it could apply to anyone with irregular patterns of slumber.  Having a lie-in at the weekend when you are used to getting up early all week can affect your mood and increase the risk of depression, according to a new study The medical interns that were used as part...
    Victims of racism should take Ecstasy or magic mushrooms to reduce the trauma of their experience, suggests a new study. Scientists found a single psychedelic trip from mushrooms, acid or MDMA could help victims overcome the racism they have been subjected to.  Psychedelic drugs could also help reduce stress, depression and anxiety in black, Indigenous and people of colour whose encounters with racism have had lasting harm, according to the findings. In the new study, participants reported that their trauma-related symptoms linked to racist acts were lowered in the 30 days after an experience with either psilocybin, also known as magic mushrooms, LSD or MDMA, also known as Ecstasy. Scroll down for video  Scientists found a single psychedelic trip from mushrooms, acid or MDMA could help victims overcome the racism they have been subjected to 'Their experience with psychedelic drugs was so powerful that they could recall and report on changes in symptoms from racial trauma that they had experienced in their lives,' said research co-lead author Dr Alan Davis, an Assistant Professor at Ohio State University in the...
    By Patrick Whittle | Associated Press PORTLAND, Maine — The coronavirus pandemic has hurt the U.S. seafood industry due to a precipitous fall in imports and exports and a drop in catch of some species. Those are the findings of a group of scientists who sought to quantify the damage of the pandemic on America’s seafood business, which has also suffered in part because of its reliance on restaurant sales. Consumer demand for seafood at restaurants dropped by more than 70% during the early months of the pandemic, according to the scientists, who published their findings recently in the scientific journal Fish and Fisheries. Imports fell about 37% and exports about 43% over the first nine months of the year compared to 2019, the study said. The economic impact has been felt most severely in states that rely heavily on the seafood sector, such as Maine, Alaska and Louisiana, said Easton White, a University of Vermont biologist and the study’s lead author. It hasn’t all been doom and gloom for the industry, as seafood delivery and home cooking have helped...
    The risk of premature death — including from cancer or cardiovascular disease — is reduced by around a quarter among those who eat chilli peppers, a study found. Researchers from the US found that the anti-inflammatory properties of capsaicin — the compound that gives peppers their fiery taste — may have wide health benefits. These include both combatting tumours and inflammation and helping the body to control its blood glucose levels.  The 'quite remarkable' findings came after the team analysed the health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people across the globe. However, the researchers noted that further studies will be needed to establish which varieties of chilli confer protection and how often one should consume them. The risk of premature death — including from cancer or cardiovascular disease — is reduced by around a quarter among those who eat chilli peppers (pictured), a study has found EAT CHILLI PEPPERS IN LOCKDOWN, EXPERTS HAVE SUGGESTED Lockdown could provide Britons with the chance to pack potentially life-saving chilli peppers into their meals, heart experts have said. 'Many of us...
    Almost one in four of New York City's Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) workers may have contracted coronavirus, a new study has found. The numbers - that come from a preliminary survey conducted by New York University with the help of the Transport Workers Union (TWU) - are much higher than previously reported. The virus has killed at least 131 MTA workers. An anonymous survey was sent to around 3,000 TWU workers in August, according to Fox 5 New York. Of those to receive the survey, 645 completed the questionnaire with 24 percent of respondents reporting that they have had a COVID-19 positive diagnosis or antibody test. The study also found that 90 percent of the transit workers fear getting sick at work, with roughly 40 percent indicating that they have underlying health problems that could increase the risk of complications from coronavirus.   In response to the study, the MTA has disputed its findings and blasted the report saying 'this is a poll, not a study', saying their data shows only 3,921 of their 70,000 strong workforce have contracted the virus. Almost...
    Narcissists are more likely to be politically active, according to a new research. Researchers found individuals who displayed classic narcissistic traits - like selfishness, entitlement and a need for admiration - were more likely to sign petitions, reach out to elected officials and vote in midterm elections. People who were self-sufficient, however, were less likely to be politically engaged.  Peter Hatemi, a political science professor at Penn State University, said his findings may explain 'the current state of our democracy.' 'If people who are more interested in their own personal gain and status take a greater part in elections, then we can expect candidates to emerge who reflect their desires -- narcissism begets narcissism,' said Hatemi, whose research was published in the journal Society for Personality and Social Psychology. People who display classic signs of narcissism - selfishness, entitlement and a need for admiration - are more likely to participate in political activities  Sander Thomaes, a developmental psychologist at Utrecht University, has called President Donald Trump a 'prototypical narcissist,' exhibiting a grandiose self image, an overinflated ego, an insatiable...
    Miami-Dade police officers watch as demonstrators walk past during a protest against police brutality and the recent death of George Floyd on June 02, 2020 in Miami, Florida. Protests continue to be held in cities throughout the country over the death of George Floyd, who was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25th. Joe Raedle/Getty Images Two study authors have retracted their research after it was used in two opinion columns to dismiss systemic racism by police is a myth. The researchers said they were careless in their study's methodology, and the lack of complete data on nationwide police-civilian interactions led to flawed results. In response to the retraction, conservative news outlets said the authors were only doing so to appease people who complained. The authors said this was not the case. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Two researchers who wrote a study on racial disparities in fatal police shootings have retracted their work after an opinion columnist at the Wall Street Journal misused the findings, they said. The study in question was...
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