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    A former McDonald's CEO credited with inventing the McNugget is now leading the charge against corporations that implement woke policies. Ed Rensi, who served as the CEO of McDonalds from 1991 to 1997, is partnering with conservative advocacy groups to form The Boardroom Initiative, FOX News has reported.   Its goal is to protect share holders and employees of publicly traded companies from 'woke' policies, which the group says imperil profits and thus betray the very shareholders who pay corporation staffs' wages. The Boardroom Initiative also aims to counter left-wing groups' decision to buy up stocks in the businesses until they raise enough clout to lobby the board to adopt woke policies on issues including gender and race.  The Free Enterprise Project, an existing body which has joined forces with The Boardroom Initiative, has laid out a blueprint to tackle woke overreach. Its members have bought 2,000 Bank of America shares - enough to formally propose a motion at the next shareholder meeting. They will now demand the firm undertake a civil rights audit to try and stop staff pushing critical race...
    The matter concerns important issues, such as whether biological males who identify as women should be allowed to compete in athletic events designated for biological females or use bathrooms and other facilities designated for females. In some cases, red states have been enacting legislation to push back against the reality-defying gender-bending movement. On Friday, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey, a Republican, signed two such pieces of legislation, including one that makes it a felony to prescribe or administer puberty blockers or gender transition hormones to individuals younger than 19 — the bill also makes it a felony to perform gender reassignment surgeries on people in that age range. "There are very real challenges facing our young people, especially with today's societal pressures and modern culture," Ivey said in a statement. "I believe very strongly that if the Good Lord made you a boy, you are a boy, and if he made you a girl, you are a girl. We should especially protect our children from these radical, life-altering drugs and surgeries when they are at such a vulnerable stage in...
    Obama-era Treasury official Steven Rattner tore into President Biden for being 'disingenuous' about inflation on Friday.  In a New York Times op-ed entitled 'Biden Keeps Blaming the Supply Chain for Inflation. That's Dishonest,' Rattner said Thursday that supply issues are 'by no means the root cause of our inflation.' Biden has consistently blamed backlogged ports for the highest inflation in 40 years - at 7.5% year-over-year as of January.  'The reason for the inflation is the supply chains were cut off,' Biden said in an interview with NBC's Lester Holt last week.   'Blaming inflation on supply lines is like complaining about your sweater keeping you too warm after you've added several logs to the fireplace,' Rattner quipped.   The former counselor to the Treasury secretary said that Biden also needs to shift his focus beyond anti-trust enforcement.  The White House 'has promised robust antitrust enforcement, but while that is long overdue, it will have no discernible impact on competition or prices for years. And the high prices of meat and hearing aids, both of which Mr. Biden has vowed to address,...
    The biggest culprit for rising prices that's not being talked about is the increasing economic concentration of the American economy in the hands of a relative few giant big corporations with the power to raise prices. If markets were competitive, companies would seek to keep their prices down in order to maintain customer loyalty and demand. When the prices of their supplies rose, they'd cut their profits before they raised prices to their customers, for fear that otherwise a competitor would grab those customers away. But strange enough, this isn't happening. In fact, even in the face of supply constraints, corporations are raking in record profits. More than 80 percent of big (S&P 500) companies that have reported results this season have topped analysts' earnings forecasts, according to Refinitiv. Obviously, supply constraints have not eroded these profits. Corporations are simply passing the added costs on to their customers. Many are raising their prices even further, and pocketing even more. How can this be? For a simple and obvious reason: Most don't have to worry about competitors grabbing their...
    This story was first published at The Hartmann Report. If President Biden's Build Back Better plan goes down in flames, you can blame the US Supreme Court. Their Citizens United decision, in fact, is destroying both American politics and the planet. Case in point: Oil industry executives testified before Congress this week, suffering a barrage of questions, including particularly intense ones from Reps. Ro Khanna, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Katie Porter. The CEOs exhibited the same sort of arrogant insolence Mark Zuckerberg displayed in July of last year when he was hauled before the House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law. It was, basically, a smug, "Screw you, Congressperson." Why were the representatives of Big Oil and Big Tech unafraid of the power of Congress? Because, at the end of the day, they own that power. The Supreme Court gave it to them with their poisonous Citizens United decision. It turns out that Big Oil has spent, just over the past decade, over $450 million lobbying the federal government. We used to call this political corruption or...
    You don't have to defend Jon Gruden's words to wonder why emails he sent 10 years ago are surfacing now. I certainly don't. I'm much more of a Tony Dungy guy in terms of both style and substance. I also believe using email to personally attack people the way Gruden did was extremely unwise. The truth, however, is that every person in corporate America is facing extinction from the marriage of corporations and social justice in the workplace. A person who is appalled by the content of Jon Gruden's emails may one day find himself being pressured to fly one of the pride flags his company passes out to employees in June. His religious convictions about gender and sexuality may not be enough to keep him out of corporate crosshairs. He must adapt or DIE — or more specifically, feel the full weight of his company's Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity regime. The NFL suffered a tremendous public relations loss during the Kaepernick years. It tried to appease players who felt entitled to engage in political protest on their...
    Rick Scott Corporations are never going to save us. They’re never even going to meet the low bar they set for their own PR purposes, as the aftermath of the attack on the U.S. Capitol reminds us. Following the violent insurrection by Trump supporters trying to prevent Congress from certifying the results of the 2020 presidential election, dozens of major companies swore they would not contribute to the campaigns of the 147 Republican lawmakers who followed the attack by voting against certifying the results. Tuesday marked six months since January 6, and many of those companies had long since broken their own promises. In some cases, like Intel, AT&T, and Cigna, it took less than two months. The common excuse these corporations use is that they aren’t giving directly to the Republicans who tried to prevent the peaceful transition of power. They’re just giving to PACs that support those Republicans. AT&T told the Associated Press that when it gave $5,000 to the House Conservatives Fund, it extracted the promise that its money wouldn’t go to support any of the House members...
    A group of Republicans operative has founded an organization called Unsilenced Majority to fight the left's cancel culture by encouraging everyday Americans to boycott politicians and corporations that go 'woke'.  The group is being spearheaded by Mike Davis, a former staffer for the Senate Judiciary Committee under Sen. Chuck Grassley.  Their mission is to take on corporations that 'go woke' by encouraging every say Americans to boycott them.  In their mission statement, they say on their website: 'We strongly believe that corporate censorship, thought-policing and politically motivated blacklists and boycotts are having a corrosive effect on our country and will ultimately lead to a less free world. The group is being spearheaded by Mike Davis, a former staffer for the Senate Judiciary Committee under Sen. Chuck Grassley. 'We also believe that freedom of speech and diversity of thought are fundamental bedrocks of a free society and should always be protected and celebrated.  'Unsilenced Majority speaks for an emboldened majority of Americans who recognize the imminent threat that cancel culture poses to our nation.'  The group hasn't given any...
    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis In the latest of installment of GOP opportunism, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis took aim at corporate America while speaking at last weekend's Republican National Committee retreat.  In a recording obtained by the Washington Post, DeSantis told attendees major businesses were "getting in bed with the left, the corporate media, and big tech."   "These corporate executives have no backbone, they don’t want to be criticized by the corporate partisan media—they cave, they virtue signal in one direction,” DeSantis said, complaining that "woke corporations" were "colluding" with the left. “We have to stand up for ourselves, we’ve got to fight back.” Wow. No backbone, colluders, woke—it all sounds like a very dicey mix coming for Republicans, who are now the supposed victims of a runaway effort to combat racist GOP voting policies nationwide. Of course, DeSantis is just the latest in a long line of 2024 GOP hopefuls trying to raise their profile by reviling corporate America's stand against Republicans' voter suppression efforts. The question people on both sides of the aisle are asking is: Is this developing...
    The Republican refrain about everything but tax cuts for corporations and the wealthy has long been “But how can we afford it?” A giant tax cut for those at the top? Sure! No problem! Bridges, trains, schools, an upgraded and secure power grid? It’s just too expensive.  President Joe Biden is looking to flip that on its head by increasing the tax rate for corporations, closing key loopholes for the biggest and most profitable companies, and using the money to pay for an infrastructure plan that will finally move the U.S. into the 21st century in key ways. Biden is proposing a corporate tax increase from 21% to 28%—and if that sounds like a big increase to you, remember that in 2017, Republicans lowered it to 21% from 35%, so Biden is only trying to go halfway back. The reality is that many big companies pay nothing—zero—in federal corporate income taxes. A study by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy found that that statement applied to 55 of the largest corporations in the U.S. in the most recent fiscal year. If...
    Farmworkers are vital to society. Their product satisfies one of our basic needs: sustenance. Their work is not only extremely important, but also difficult. They work long hours in the elements, planting, caring for, and harvesting crops to be sold for our consumption. Despite the difficulty and necessity of their work, farmworkers around the world are taken advantage of and exploited by large businesses and corporations. Source: BBC News/YouTube According to The Guardian, only 1% of farms own 70% of the world’s farmland. Thus, there is a huge discrepancy between the land owned by smallholders or family farms and larger farming conglomerates. Thus, most farmworkers are at the mercy of large corporations, who care more about their own profits than workers, the environment, and the local communities surrounding each farm. Right now, one of the largest workers’ strikes in the history of the world is taking place in India. The protests were spurred by recent laws that the government passed that grant shocking levels of power to corporations and disempower workers who are already struggling. One of these laws gives corporations the...
    Large corporations have endorsed and lobbied for a $15 federal minimum wage in recent years, but while they can afford such a policy, small businesses would be harmed, multiple studies have shown. “More than doubling the federal minimum wage is one of the policies that would threaten the fragile small business economic recovery,” said National Federation of Independent Business Vice President of Federal Government Relations Kevin Kuhlman. The $15 minimum wage would result in 1.3 million workers losing their jobs, a 2019 Congressional Budget Office report estimated. Large corporations have endorsed and lobbied for a $15 federal minimum wage in recent years, but while they can afford such a policy, small businesses would be harmed, studies have shown. Many corporations, once known for their opposition to raising the federal minimum wage, have reversed course in recent years, raising their own wages to $15 per hour and lobbying the federal government to legislate an increase. While larger corporations have determined they could benefit from such a reversal, studies continue to show a federal minimum wage hike will crush small...
    REUTERS/Brendan McdermidIn 2020, Target’s PAC gave $217,500 to Republican federal candidates, or about 53 percent of its total donations, and $191,500 to Democratic federal candidates, or nearly 47 percent of total donations.It’s always been risky for corporations to funnel money into politics. The insurrection at the U.S. Capitol earlier this month showed just how risky it can be for companies to align themselves with certain political causes and candidates. After a band of pro-Trump extremists stormed the chambers of the Congress on Jan. 6, several Minnesota companies announced plans to suspend political donations in some fashion. Some vowed to end donations to Republican lawmakers who objected to the certification of the Electoral College vote; others opted to suspend all political donations. But it’s not yet clear if these changes will stick, or if they’ll even serve as an effective means to change politics for good. Some observers see the changes as “too little, too late.” And indeed, what good is it to halt political donations when there aren’t any major elections happening? Larry Jacobs, a professor at the University of...
    Corporate executives called on senators to certify Joe Biden's election — but they didn't listen. A group of corporate executives last week urged Congress to certify President-elect Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential election. Several of the Republican senators bankrolled by their corporate PACs tried to block that certification. Nearly 200 chief executives signed on to a letter released on Jan. 4 that call for lawmakers to accept the election results during the joint session of Congress scheduled for two days later to certify Electoral College voting results. "Attempts to thwart or delay this process run counter to the essential tenets of our democracy," the letter said. "There should be no further delay in the orderly transfer of power."
    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Alaska Native corporations are eligible for a share of coronavirus relief funding set aside for tribes, a federal judge ruled late Friday in a case that has been closely watched around Indian Country. U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in Washington, D.C., initially granted a request from tribal nations to withhold money from the corporations while he determined whether they qualified for a share of $8 billion. Mehta said the corporations can be treated as tribal governments for limited purposes after sorting through arguments that picked apart the language in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, congressional intent and the history of other federal laws. “It stands to reason that Congress, in its effort to distribute emergency funds quickly to Indians under the CARES Act, intended to get those dollars in the hands of the same entities that deliver public services to Indians,” he wrote. “In the lower 48 states, those entities are largely Tribal governments in the traditional sense, but in Alaska, those entities include Alaska Native village and regional corporations.” Various tribes...
    By FELICIA FONSECA, Associated Press FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Alaska Native corporations are eligible for a share of coronavirus relief funding set aside for tribes, a federal judge ruled late Friday in a case that has been closely watched around Indian Country. U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in Washington, D.C., initially granted a request from tribal nations to withhold money from the corporations while he determined whether they qualified for a share of $8 billion. Mehta said the corporations can be treated as tribal governments for limited purposes after sorting through arguments that picked apart the language in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, congressional intent and the history of other federal laws. “It stands to reason that Congress, in its effort to distribute emergency funds quickly to Indians under the CARES Act, intended to get those dollars in the hands of the same entities that deliver public services to Indians,” he wrote. “In the lower 48 states, those entities are largely Tribal governments in the traditional sense, but in Alaska, those entities include Alaska Native village and...
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