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    In this article 69-HK IHG-GB HLT AC-FR .SSEC MAR Business travelers are on the road again. So there's no better time for CNBC Travel to name the best hotels for business travel across Asia-Pacific. CNBC joined with the market and consumer data firm Statista to produce rankings of the "Best Hotels for Business Travelers." A second list of rankings for hotels in Europe and the Middle East will be published next month. In total, we analyzed more than 10,000 four- and five-star hotels in 117 locations to produce a list corporate travelers can trust. We did this using a three-step process: Asking business travelers and hotel industry professionals to answer a CNBC reader survey which ran from May 3 to June 7, 2022. Reviewing more than 1 million hotel data points, which included objective information (location, business facilities, food, leisure activities and room characteristics) and subjective reviews (gathered from Google, TripAdvisor, Expedia and similar websites). Weighting the data to prioritize the hotel characteristics deemed most important in the reader survey. For full details about our research...
    Japan will undertake a major military upgrade to deter a war involving China, an overhaul that could include weapons capable of striking the communist regime. “I myself have a strong sense of urgency that Ukraine today, maybe East Asia tomorrow,” Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida told a security conference in Singapore. “We must be prepared for the emergence of an entity that tramples on the peace and security of other countries by force or threat without honoring the rules.” Kishida did not mention China by name, but his calculation was clear. The Russian attack on Ukraine set a precedent, in his telling, that could foreshadow a conflict in Indo-Pacific regions where Beijing has made unilateral sovereignty claims. “In the South China Sea, are the rules really being honored?” he said, before citing the unheeded international ruling that condemned China’s assertion of sovereignty over the vast waterways. “In the East China Sea, where Japan is located, unilateral attempts to change the status quo by force in violation of international law are continuing. Japan is taking a firm stand against such attempts....
    VIDEO3:5203:52Biden administration is signaling that Asia is a top priority, analyst saysCapital Connection The Indo-Pacific is set to play a much bigger role in U.S. foreign policy, with Asia being a top priority, according to political experts. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin are in Japan and South Korea this week, visiting Washington's two major military allies in Asia where tens of thousands of troops are stationed. Last Friday, President Joe Biden virtually met the prime ministers of Japan, India and Australia as part of the first leaders' summit of an informal strategic alliance — the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, or Quad as it's known. "Asia is the priority," said Angela Mancini, a partner at Control Risks, on CNBC's "Capital Connection" Monday. She explained that based on last week's Quad meeting as well as the overall diplomacy that's happening with the current administration, the U.S. is making it very clear that the Indo-Pacific region is important to Washington — compared to the previous administration's transactional approach.President Joe Biden, top left, Yoshihide Suga, Japan's prime...
    The head of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command told lawmakers this week that the U.S. is losing its edge over the Chinese military as the People’s Republic of China faces weakening international deterrence. Testifying for the Senate Armed Services Committee Tuesday, Admiral Philip Davidson, head of Indo-Pacific command, warned against an increasing "imbalance" in the region brought on by China’s rapid military advance. "The military balance in the Indo-Pacific is becoming more unfavorable for the United States and our allies," Davidson said. "With this imbalance, we are accumulating risk that may embolden China to unilaterally change the status quo before our forces may be able to deliver an effective response." China announced last week it will increase its defense budget by 6.8 percent in 2022, allocating $208.6 billion to their defense budget – a move that has concerned U.S. lawmakers and defense officials. Davidson said that by 2025, China will be able to deploy three aircraft carriers, and he expressed concern surrounding the imminent threat China’s aggressive behavior poses for Taiwan. "I cannot for the life of me understand some of the capabilities that they're...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The United States military needs more long-range weaponry in the western Pacific, including ground-based arms, the top U.S. admiral for the Asia-Pacific said on Tuesday, underscoring U.S. concerns about China's growing military strength, particularly among its missile forces. President Joe Biden's administration has said the United States intends to compete with China's growing influence and military strength in the Asia-Pacific. The Pentagon is carrying out a review of its strategy in the region. "A wider base of long-range precision fires, which are enabled by all our terrestrial forces - not just sea and air but by land forces as well - is critically important to stabilize what is becoming a more unstable environment in the western Pacific," Admiral Phil Davidson, commander for U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, told a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing. Davidson cited enthusiasm by the Army and Marine Corps "to embrace some of the capabilities that the Navy and Air Force have already developed." A budget document provided to Congress last month by the Indo-Pacific Command said the United States needed increased ground-based weapons along...
    (CNN)Will you get a third stimulus payment? Time to check your eligibility.Here's what you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day. (You can also get "5 Things You Need to Know Today" delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up here.)1. CoronavirusThe CDC has released highly anticipated new guidelines for people fully vaccinated against Covid-19, saying it is safe for them to gather together without masks indoors and to visit with unvaccinated people in certain circumstances. The new guidance was met with joy and renewed hope that a return to normalcy is around the corner. However, ex-CDC chief Dr. Tom Frieden cautioned that we shouldn't give up on safety measures yet, saying, "You don't declare victory in the third quarter." WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus gave a similar worldwide warning, saying, "There are no shortcuts" to recovery. After all, one coronavirus variant is now spreading exponentially through the US, experts say. Meanwhile, it looks like the House will now vote tomorrow on the massive coronavirus relief package.JUST WATCHED'Defies common sense': Dr. Wen reacts to CDC...
    Anti-fascist protesters vandalize Oregon Democrats office on Biden inaugural day Trump labor board counsel fired after resisting Bidens call for resignation Offices are the top choice for Asia-Pacific property investors in 2021, survey finds Real estate investors in Asia Pacific are most likely to put money into offices in 2021, with 31% of respondents choosing the sector over other market segments in a recent survey. That's despite huge changes to workplaces following the coronavirus pandemic, such as work-from-home arrangements becoming the norm last year. There is growing confidence that offices are still "very relevant," though some believe that Covid-19 and remote working could bring about the "death of offices," said Terence Tang of Colliers International. Asia-Pacifics Tier 1 city offices remain asset of choice among investors: Colliers International CNBC See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next How you can save $1 million for retirement USA TODAY How much the most populous states pay mail carriers GOBankingRates Creepy ways your company can spy on you while you...
    (Adds White House statement, U.S. Senator Coons on China) * APEC leaders issue first joint communique in three years * Agree to refrain from protectionist trade policies * Malaysian PM says U.S.-China trade war eclipsed by pandemic By Joseph Sipalan and A. Ananthalakshmi KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 20 (Reuters) – Asia Pacific leaders set aside differences on Friday with their first joint communique in three years, calling for free and predictable trade to help a global economy laid low by the coronavirus pandemic. Leaders of the 21-nation Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), who included U.S. President Donald Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping, also said they would not resort to protectionist policies. Their joint statement, after a virtual summit hosted by Malaysia, is set against a backdrop of ongoing trade tensions between the world’s two largest economies. “The impact of (the U.S.-China) trade war has been eclipsed by the COVID-19 pandemic,” Malaysian Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin told reporters after the meeting. “APEC has also pledged to refrain from backtracking and resorting to protectionist measures to keep markets and borders open,” he said....
    KUALA LUMPUR - Asia Pacific leaders set aside differences Friday with their first joint communique in three years, calling for free and predictable trade to help a global economy laid low by the coronavirus pandemic. Leaders of the 21-nation Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), which included U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping, also said they would not resort to protectionist policies. Their joint statement, after a virtual summit hosted by Malaysia, is set against a backdrop of ongoing trade tensions between the world's two largest economies. Malaysia's Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin takes part in the online Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation leaders' summit in Kuala Lumpur, Nov. 20, 2020."The impact of [the U.S.-China] trade war has been eclipsed by the COVID-19 pandemic," Malaysian Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin told reporters after the meeting. "APEC has also pledged to refrain from backtracking and resorting to protectionist measures to keep markets and borders open," he said. In the communique, the leaders said they recognized "the importance of a free, open, fair, nondiscriminatory, transparent and predictable trade and investment environment" to drive...
    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Leaders from Japan and New Zealand on Friday warned countries against the temptation of retreating into trade protectionism, saying that keeping markets open is the way to restore a global economy battered by the COVID-19 pandemic. Speaking by video link from Tokyo to a meeting of Asia-Pacific CEOs, Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said a “free and open Indo-Pacific will be the cornerstone for the prosperity of this region.” Japan and 14 other Asian neighbors on Sunday signed the world’s largest free trade agreement, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership. Suga, who took office in September, said Japan will next push for a wider free trade pact among the 21 members of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. “Amidst a risk of inward-looking temptations in the face of the slump of the global economy, making rules for a free and fair global economy is critically important,” he said. “While continuing to promote WTO reform, Japan will aspire for the Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific.” The event came ahead of a meeting late Friday of APEC leaders hosted...
    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Leaders from Japan and New Zealand on Friday warned countries against the temptation of retreating into trade protectionism, saying that keeping markets open is the way to restore a global economy battered by the COVID-19 pandemic. Speaking by video link from Tokyo to a meeting of Asia-Pacific CEOs, Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said a “free and open Indo-Pacific will be the cornerstone for the prosperity of this region." Japan and 14 other Asian neighbors on Sunday signed the world’s largest free trade agreement, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership. Suga, who took office in September, said Japan will next push for a wider free trade pact among the 21 members of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. “Amidst a risk of inward-looking temptations in the face of the slump of the global economy, making rules for a free and fair global economy is critically important," he said. "While continuing to promote WTO reform, Japan will aspire for the Free Trade Area of the Asia-Pacific.” The event came ahead of a meeting late Friday of APEC leaders hosted...
    By Rozanna Latiff and A. Ananthalakshmi KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 19 (Reuters) – Asia-Pacific leaders called on Thursday for open and multilateral trade to support a global economy battered by the novel coronavirus, and some hoped for more engagement with the United States under a Joe Biden administration. Chinese President Xi Jinping, among the leaders at a virtual meeting of the 21-member Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, rejected protectionism and said globalisation was “irreversible”, a day before U.S. President Donald Trump was expected to join in the gathering. “We will not reverse course or run against historical trend by ‘decoupling’ or forming a small circle to keep others out,” Xi said at a forum ahead of the APEC leaders meeting to be held virtually in Kuala Lumpur on Friday. “China will remain committed to openness and cooperation, and adhere to multilateralism and the principle of extensive consultation, joint contribution and shared benefits,” he said. Xi said “mounting unilateralism, protectionism and bullying as well as backlash against economic globalisation” had added to risks and uncertainties in the world economy. Trump has introduced...
    By Rozanna Latiff and A. Ananthalakshmi KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) – Asia-Pacific leaders called on Thursday for open and multilateral trade to support a global economy battered by the novel coronavirus, and some hoped for more engagement with the United States under a Joe Biden administration. Chinese President Xi Jinping, among the leaders at a virtual meeting of the 21-member Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, rejected protectionism and said globalisation was “irreversible”, a day before U.S. President Donald Trump was expected to join in the gathering. “We will not reverse course or run against historical trend by ‘decoupling’ or forming a small circle to keep others out,” Xi said at a forum ahead of the APEC leaders meeting to be held virtually in Kuala Lumpur on Friday. “China will remain committed to openness and cooperation, and adhere to multilateralism and the principle of extensive consultation, joint contribution and shared benefits,” he said. Xi said “mounting unilateralism, protectionism and bullying as well as backlash against economic globalisation” had added to risks and uncertainties in the world economy. Trump has introduced protectionist trade...
    Fifteen Asia-Pacific countries on Sunday signed the world's biggest free trade deal, seen as a huge coup for China in extending its influence amid the pandemic. The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) has been struck as the world's financial markets have been destroyed by coronavirus.  China's is one of the few economies to have successfully weathered the storm, despite being the country from which the calamitous virus originated.  'Under the current global circumstances, the fact the RCEP has been signed after eight years of negotiations brings a ray of light and hope amid the clouds,' said Chinese Premier Li Keqiang after the virtual signing. The deal builds on existing terms among the Association of Southeast Asian Nations - Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam - and forges a new single pact that includes Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand and South Korea.    Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc and Minister of Industry and Trade Tran Tuan Anh (R) attend the signing ceremony for the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) trade pact at the ASEAN summit...
    White House national security adviser Robert O’Brien will lead the United States delegation at two Southeast Asian virtual summits this weekend, the White House announced in a statement Friday.  The White House said O’Brien would represent the U.S. at a summit with the 10 members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) starting Friday evening U.S. time.  He is then scheduled to take part Saturday in an East Asia Summit in Hanoi, Vietnam. The discussion is expected to include the signing of the China-backed Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) by 15 Asia-Pacific economies, which could become the world’s largest free trade agreement, according to Reuters.  “Ambassador O’Brien will reaffirm the commitment of the United States to prosperity and security in the Indo-Pacific during virtual remarks,” the White House said in its statement. O’Brien’s appearances mark the third year in a row the U.S. has been represented at the East Asia summits. President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: New York won't receive COVID-19 vaccine immediately Biden considering Yellen as possible Treasury secretary: report Trump puts Giuliani in charge of election lawsuits: report...
    HONG KONG/SINGAPORE – Hong Kong and Singapore will set up a travel bubble, the two cities announced on Thursday, as they moved to re-establish overseas travel links and lift the hurdle of quarantine for visiting foreigners. Hong Kong’s Commerce Secretary Edward Yau and Singapore’s Transport Minister Ong Ye Kung said travelers under the scheme would need to get negative COVID-19 test results and travel on dedicated flights. Further details, including the launch date, will be fleshed out in coming weeks, they said. “It is a safe, careful but significant step forward to revive air travel and provide a model for future collaboration with other parts of the world,” Singapore’s Ong said. For Hong Kong, which has banned non-residents since March, the deal with Singapore is its first resumption of travel ties with another city. Travelers from mainland China and neighboring Macau still face 14 days in quarantine. Singapore has already announced pacts on essential business and official travel from China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea and opened unilaterally to general visitors from Brunei, New Zealand, Vietnam and most of...
    By Farah Master and Aradhana Aravindan HONG KONG/SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Hong Kong and Singapore will set up a travel bubble, the two cities announced on Thursday, as they moved to re-establish overseas travel links and lift the hurdle of quarantine for visiting foreigners. Hong Kong's Commerce Secretary Edward Yau and Singapore's Transport Minister Ong Ye Kung said travellers under the scheme would need to get negative COVID-19 test results and travel on dedicated flights. Further details, including the launch date, will be fleshed out in coming weeks, they said. "It is a safe, careful but significant step forward to revive air travel, and provide a model for future collaboration with other parts of the world," Singapore's Ong said. For Hong Kong, which has banned non-residents since March, the deal with Singapore is its first resumption of travel ties with another city. Travellers from mainland China and neighbouring Macau still face 14 days in quarantine. Singapore has already announced pacts on essential business and official travel from China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, and opened unilaterally to general visitors from Brunei,...
    Ever wanted to fall asleep to Harry Styles reading you a bedtime story? Now you can Diversify? Almost half of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway portfolio is now composed of a single stock Asia-Pacific Amateur, Womens Amateur Asia-Pacific canceled for 2020 The Women’s Amateur Asia-Pacific Championship was supposed to be played in mid-February, and as such was one of the first tournaments to go into limbo as the coronavirus began to spread early in 2020. That tournament was officially canceled on July 7, along with the men’s version of the event, the Asia-Pacific Amateur, which would have been played Oct. 29-Nov. 1. © Provided by Golfweek The women’s event was to take place at Siam Country Club in Pattaya, Thailand. After its early February postponement, it was rescheduled for Oct. 7-10, but that is now off the table, too. The 2021 event will be played at the same venue on Feb. 4-7, 2021. 23 Cool Products That Could Sell Out In 2020 LEARN MORE Ad Gadgets Post The Asia-Pacific Amateur would have revisited Royal Melbourne Golf Club in Australia –...
    No idea what to expect: All eyes on Major League Baseball as Spring Training 2.0 gets underway The 17 Best Sunscreens, According to Glamour Editors Asia Pacific stocks set for positive start as U.S. jobs report beats expectations Futures pointed to a positive start for stocks in Japan and Australia. Nonfarm payrolls surged by 4.8 million in June, according to the U.S. Labor Department. The figure smashed expectations by economists surveyed by Dow Jones of a 2.9 million increase in jobs created. The Labor Department also said, however, that initial jobless claims rose by 1.427 million in the week ending June 27. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected initial U.S. jobless claims to rise by another 1.38 million. Looking ahead, a private survey of China's services sector activity for June is expected on Friday, with the Caixin/Markit services Purchasing Manager's Index set to be released around 9:45 a.m. HK/SIN. Stocks in Asia Pacific were set for a positive Friday start after U.S. nonfarm payrolls released overnight beat expectations, raising optimism over the prospects of an economic recovery from the coronavirus...
    Former West Indies cricketer Everton Weekes dies aged 95. How to Clean Your Face Mask—and Protect Your Skin—for Optimal Safety This Summer Asia Pacific stocks set to rise amid coronavirus vaccine hopes; Australia trade data for May expected Futures pointed to a positive open for stocks in Japan and Australia. Investors will watch for overnight reaction to a study of a coronavirus candidate being developed by Pfizer and BioNTech that showed the drug created neutralizing antibodies. The results, which were posted online, have yet to be reviewed by a medical journal. In economic data news, Australia's trade data for May is set to be released around 9:30 a.m. HK/SIN on Thursday. Stocks in Asia Pacific were set to rise at the open on Thursday following positive news overnight around the development of a potential coronavirus vaccine. Load Error Futures pointed to a higher open for Japanese stocks. The Nikkei futures contract in Chicago was at 22,250 while its counterpart in Osaka was at 22,200. That compared against the Nikkei 225's last close at 22,121.73. Meanwhile, shares...
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