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    Hanna Rosin, author and podcaster, kicked a hornet's nest with her tweet. She apologized a day later. She is pictured in May 2013 An Israeli-American journalist and podcast host has been forced to apologize after complaining that a romantic comedy about gay Asian men vacationing on New York's Fire Island did not feature enough women. Hanna Rosin, 52, said that the Hulu film, entitled Fire Island, failed the Bechdel test - a 1980s rule that said a film needed to feature at least two women in it, who talk to each other about something other than a man. It is now seen as assessing how sexist a film is. The film is loosely based on Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Rosin on Monday tweeted: 'So @Hulu, #FireIslandMovie gets an F- on the Bechdel test in a whole new way. 'Do we just ignore the drab lesbian stereotypes because cute gay Asian boys? 'Is this revenge for all those years of the gay boy best friend?' The response was immediate and damning. Fire Island tells the story of a group of...
    The COVID-19 pandemic opened a new era of workforce digital communication, from board room to chat room and beyond, and this week, a new virtual workspace program launched.Amy Kim, who was born in South Korea and has been in the tech industry for 25 years at companies like Microsoft and Google, is the CEO of Jugo, a new virtual reality events company."One of the biggest challenges that organizations have seen in the last two years is although employees have been productive, they don't feel engaged with the organization," she said.Jugo is redefining virtual meetings by breaking out of the traditional 2-D environment and making the work experience more immersive and engaging."It really is an individual like yourself sitting in a virtual room, but also your peers or your colleagues or your organization sitting in the room," Kim said. "They're together, but they're actually joining from their location virtually."Launching the program has been exciting for Kim, who is one of the few Asian women in tech leadership.According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, of the 30% of women working in tech,...
    Harvard students have given classic musical The Mikado a woke makeover to remove racist references and turn it into a dystopian drama about goat-herding.   Students from the Harvard-Radcliffe Gilbert And Sullivan Players (HRGSP) reimagined the Gilbert and Sullivan drama in a renamed production called The Milk Made which was performed late last month.   The Harvard students chose to keep Arthur Sullivan's origin score but completely rewrote the play. Instead of a drama about the main character's search for love, they instead opted to tell the story about an Asian boat worker looking to herd goats in a futuristic Chinese-dominated London.  Keagan Yap, 25, the music director, said the changes were made to avoid the use of 'yellowface' and racism found in the original play in order to create a more woke experience.  Yellowface sees white actors don makeup and traditional clothing to make them appear Asian. It is similar to blackface, and is also now widely-regarded as offensive and racist.   'A number of our cast and crew members also have Asian heritage and belong to these cultures and to come...
    After 2020 became a year of racial reckoning with the public killing of George Floyd and the protests of injustices against Black people, 2021 offered what can best be described as a follow-up year — a continuation of some familiar story threads with other new ones emerging. Derek Chauvin, the former police officer who killed Floyd, was convicted of murder. Three men in Georgia were convicted in the killing of Ahmaud Arbury. A white gunman in Atlanta killed eight people, six of Asian descent. The movement to identify and reckon with structural racism rolled forward. And as local and state governments grappled with the removal of statues of racist historical figures, local school boards fought over how to teach the uneasy history of racism in the United States. Against this backdrop, AP’s Race and Ethnicity team tried to capture the story both in sweep and in painstaking detail. Here, some AP journalists from that team involved in the coverage reflect on some of the year’s stories and how journalism handles the coverage of race. KAT STAFFORD, AP national investigative...
    Social media users are criticizing NPR for tweeting that the choice of Michelle Wu as Boston's new mayor is 'more of a disappointment' because Wu, who is Asian, beat out three black candidates. The nonprofit media outlet tweeted the comments on Tuesday, along with a link to a story featuring quotes from people who believe Wu's election is just another example of, 'What else is new?' Wu, a former city council member, became the first woman and the first person of color to be elected mayor of Boston on November 2. She assumed office Tuesday.  NPR has since deleted the original tweet, saying that it 'misrepresented the story,' though the overall parameters and gripes in the original article remain the same. Boston Mayor Michelle Wu, left, beat out acting mayor Kim Janey, right, and two other black candidates earlier this month, becoming the first woman and Asian elected mayor As Wu assumed office on Tuesday, NPR tweeted a story suggesting her election was a 'disappointment' because 'three black candidates couldn't even come close'  The publicly funded outlet later deleted...
    Saul Loeb/Getty Images NPR on Tuesday deleted a tweet claiming “disappointment” among voters in Boston after the city elected its first Asian mayor, saying it doesn’t “always get things right the first time.” “Michelle Wu, an Asian American, is the first woman and first person color elected to lead the city,” NPR noted in an initial missive. “While many are hailing it as a turning point, others see it as more of a disappointment that the three Black candidates couldn’t even come close.” The tweet vanished by Tuesday afternoon. “Many were hopeful Boston would finally elect its first Black mayor, as most of the nation’s 30 largest cities have already done,” NPR wrote in a revised version. “Black activists and political strategists reflect on what they can learn from the 2021 campaign season.” The company  added in a follow-up: “We realize we don’t always get things right the first time, and our previous tweet/headline misrepresented the story. We deleted the previous tweet, which was causing harm, and have updated the story.” Eagle-eyed critics noticed the change and ridiculed NPR...
    But back to his son's comments, for years various viruses were given names based on where they originated. From the Spanish flu (which is self-explanatory) and Zika virus (which originated from the Zika Valley in central Africa) to MERS (which stood for Middle East respiratory syndrome), many illnesses had monikers that were geographically based. It's interesting, though, that before this pandemic officially became COVID, it was known as the Wuhan coronavirus. Don't believe me? All you had to do was turn on some of the same major media outlets that are so outraged by certain labels used by select individuals. Right now, the Texans are having a miserable year. Currently they are dead last in the AFC South with a record of 1-6, and their relationship with Deshaun Watson is not destined for a … happy ending. (Sorry, couldn't resist.) The story on McNair is selective outrage, at best. An overreaching agenda at worst. This should be a non-story. Several months ago the term "China virus" — or anything close to it — was blamed for the spike in...
    Having difficulty talking to your children about the rising anti-Asian violence across the country? Well, Sesame Street has got you covered. Amid the bullying many Asian American children are facing, Sesame Street has created content to help parents and children talk about why it's wrong to make comments on one’s appearance. Additionally, the video featuring a child who experiences bullying also reminds children that they should be proud of what they look like. “Your eyes tell the story of your family. They show where you come from, and how you came to be. The color, the shape, and the size. Should always make you proud of your eyes,” the characters sing in the video titled “Proud of Your Eyes.” The video was released Monday as part of Sesame Workshop’s collection of new content under the The ABCs of Racial Literacy initiative. It follows a rise in violence and hate speech against the AAPI community, much of which has been attributed to COVID-19 misinformation and xenophobic language used to describe the virus. The initiative hopes to help families talk about racial justice and...
    On Thursday’s broadcast of MSNBC’s “All In,” Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX) stated that “the real question on this Critical Race Theory is why we’re so afraid of race. Why is it the third rail?” When we’re better as a country when we talk about race. Jackson Lee responded to a question on the debate over CRT in schools by saying, “You know what we should be teaching is truth. We held people in bondage, we had a brutal history, meaning America. There were masters and slaves. The Constitution did not grant us citizenship or even status as one human being. But we survived and we had the Harriet Tubmans of the world, the Sojourner Truths of the world, we had the Frederick Douglasses of the world. And so, that is the beauty of America. We were resilient. We should tell that story. Brutality comes with survival and success, and then we need to tell the story that the day that we were freed shows America’s compassion and love for freedom. The day of the Emancipation Proclamation and in 1863,...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Every day, when Mantakarn Seenin takes BART to work, she wears a small, nondescript purse, pulls her hair back in to a bun to make her look more like a boy, and carries pepper spray. But even all those precautions were not enough.This week, Seenin, a 34-year-old immigrant from Thailand, was the target of the exact type of attack she's been hoping to prevent.RELATED: Family of Asian grandmother stabbed at SF bus stop in 'shock and disbelief'"I just say, I never thought it was going to happen with me, because I'm the one that was always like 'be careful, be safe,'" Seenin said in an exclusive interview with ABC7 News.On Tuesday around 8 a.m., Seenin was commuting to work on BART, and nearing Civic Center in San Francisco, when a stranger approached her and demanded she hand over her cell phone. Seenin refused and he immediately began to attack her."He just started punching me so many times. Like hit me. Just punching me on my face," she recalled. Mantakarn was on BART heading to work at...
    Crystal Kung Minkoff is making history as the first Asian American to hold a diamond on “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills,” and she’s not taking the moment lightly. “It’s certainly quite poignant to be the first Asian-American on the show. The responsibility is there and I’m proud to be the one to represent our group,” she told Page Six in a recent interview. “I have one story and I’d like to represent my story. And my culture is a massive part of it. It’s all-encompassing for me. But it’s just my story. So I think that, hopefully, I’ll be the first, but not the last, because I’m Chinese American from the Valley. That’s my story.” It was announced in October that the Real Coco founder, 35, had joined the franchise in October, and she says she hopes “RHOBH” will ultimately include stories other than hers and Garcelle Beauvais.’ (Beauvais, 54, became the show’s first black “Housewife” when she joined the show in 2019.) “I think we need a lot more representation,” Minkoff says. “It starts with one person, but...
    I grew up in a middle-income, almost all-white suburb of New York City. Kids picked fights with me because I had funny eyes and they wanted to see if I knew Kung Fu. (I didn’t.) I knew better than to ask my father for help. He — the strong and silent type — expected me to bear adversity without complaint. So I would come home and ask my mom why no one liked me. She told me that because we were different I needed to work harder, become rich and successful and then I’d have lots of friends. I nodded, taking her words to heart. If I was successful, no one would see me as Asian. As the years went by, I met many other Asian-Americans who had also agreed to this same deal. After college I moved to New York City and climbed the ladder. When I faced micro-aggressions or racism, I laughed it off. Being mistaken for a delivery boy or being “ching-chonged” in the subway wasn’t a big deal because I was sticking to the deal:...
    LOS ANGELES -- Korean American churches across California tell a story dating back more than a century."I remember reading that within three square miles, there's like 115 Korean churches in Koreatown," said Young Lee, a pastor at Hillside L.A. church.For Grace Kim, age 90, that story began in present-day North Korea."[My] great, great grandparents became Presbyterian. That was a long, long time ago," said Kim, a proud fourth-generation Presbyterian.Nearly 30% of South Koreans identified as Christian in 2010, according to the Pew Research Center, a huge jump from just 1% in the early 20th century. Pew pinned Christianity's rapid growth on the efforts of missionaries and churches in the country.VIDEO: Watch the trailer for 'Our America: Asian Voices' EMBED More News Videos Our America: Asian Voices tell the stories of Asian and Pacific Islander groups in America, exploring how they built communities and what it means to be Asian and Pacific Islander in America. .Kim said she was born in China after her family fled the Japanese occupation of Korea."When I lived in Shanghai, church was our home. We were...
    SAN FRANCISCO -- A few years ago, a friend reached out to me, asking if I could help a neighbor who heard there was a grandma who was beaten up on a playground in Visitacion Valley. Accompanying the message was a photo of a tiny, white-haired woman in her 80s, crumpled on the ground near a slide and swing set. I remember staring at that photo thinking how much she looked like my own grandmother.It took me days to convince the woman's granddaughter to talk and to trust me enough to let down that wall to share her pain. Growing up, Asian Americans are taught to "stay in their lane" and "not to cause a fuss." That would be dishonorable. I shared with this granddaughter my own story of crying as a child and how my own mother would bark and say the only time I was to cry was at her funeral -- because it showed weakness.It wouldn't be until the coronavirus pandemic where I realized the power of my perspective as an Asian American. How that would open...
    WESTCHESTER SQUARE, The Bronx (WABC) -- A 3-year-old boy is lucky to be alive after falling five stories out a window in his Bronx apartment Monday afternoon.The boy plunged from the bedroom window of the apartment on Maclay Avenue in the Westchester Square section just after 1:30 p.m.He struck a store awning before landing on the ground.ALSO READ | Asian woman, recent FIT graduate, hit with hammer in Hell's KitchenEMBED More News Videos Police in Manhattan are looking for a woman who attacked an Asian woman with a hammer Sunday night near Times Square. He was taken to Jacobi Medical Center with a contusion to the head, a broken right femur, and other injuries.Miraculously, he is expected to survive.His mother, who was home at the time, told police he apparently pushed on a piece of cardboard out next to the air conditioner.No criminality was suspected.The city's Administration for Children's Services was notified.ALSO READ | Allergist explains why pollen levels are so high and how to find reliefEMBED More News VideosIf you're suffering from spring allergies you are not alone. The...
    Will Wilmingtons new bishop give President Biden Communion? CDC: Dozens of adverse reactions caused by anxiety, not Johnson & Johnson vaccine Welcome to Heat Vision Download, a monthly column from The Hollywood Reporter looking at upcoming movies, TV shows, books and games in the genre space. From an overload of Star Wars and Marvel offerings (Disney+’s Bad Batch and Hulu’s M.O.D.O.K. to name a few) to Mass Effect: Legendary Edition arriving for fans of the sci-fi gaming franchise, May is not holding back. For the comics crew, a new noir by Pornsak Pichetshote titled The Good Asian arrives, following a haunted detective who is on the trail of a killer in 1936 Chinatown. A Quiet Place II also hits theaters this month, following the Abott family (Emily Blunt, Noah Jupe, and Millicent Simmonds) as they venture further into their post-apocalyptic world than in the first movie. Check out more of Heat Vision’s recommendations for what you can stream, play and read in May below. WHAT TO WATCH Star Wars: The Bad Batch  (May 4 – Disney+) Timed perfectly to Star Wars Day, the next Star Wars animated series...
    Everything about the next Life is Strange game feels momentous. There’s Alex Chen, an Asian American protagonist who is taking center stage at the same time that the United States is reckoning with its violent (and ongoing) bigotry against Asian Americans. The representation goes beyond the leading lady, though. Lead writer Felice Kuan is penning the story at Deck Nine Games, and voice actor Erika Mori — along with Alex’s singing voice, depicted by singer songwriter mxmtoon — will help bring that vision to life. The Asian American visibility at this specific moment in time is not lost on Kuan. In a brief interview with News Brig, the developer noted that while the timing is a coincidence, she knows what the game will mean to people in 2021. “I am very happy that you know, for an Asian American protagonist, that that empathy is a big theme and is the power,” she said. “So I am I have been very moved by the fan response, some of which has talked about, you know, recent events … I’m very happy...
    The Adil Hussain-starrer Raahgir: The Wayfarers is the opening film at the 23rd UK Asian Film Festival, which starts on May 26. The actor shared the news on Instagram. Sharing a still from the Goutam Ghose directorial that features him with actress Tillotama Shome, he wrote: “Thrilled to announce that Our film #Raahgir/#Wayfaeres is opening 23rd UK Asian Film Festival from 26th May. Director #GautamGhose producer @itsonlyamitagarwal. In the Lead @tillotamashome @neerajkabi and me.” Adil Hussain: Art Should Build Bridges and Not Burn Them. The film’s story centres around an encounter between two underprivileged people who are trying to find economic opportunities. Adil is known for his roles in films like Mukti Bhawan, Life Of Pi, The Reluctant Fundamentalist and English Vinglish. He was recently seen in the OTT-released film The Illegal. Goutam Ghose Speaks Up About His Film Raahgir Getting Screened at Shanghai Film Fest During Indo-China Tension. Check Out Adil Hussain’s Instagram Post Below:   Tillotama has made her mark with roles in films like Monsoon Weddings, Qissa. A Death In The Gunj, and Hindi...
    Marvel unveiled the first trailer for its upcoming superhero movie "Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings," which marks the first film in the franchise to boasts a predominantly Asian cast.  The trailer gives fans a brief glimpse at the hero’s origin story, depicting a young man who was raised to be an assassin but ultimately stepped away from that life to try and live a normal one in San Francisco. However, when his old life catches up with him, he’s forced to rely on his martial arts training and fight his way out from under his father’s sinister plans. While the promise of a new superhero in the Marvel Cinematic Universe is enough to get fans excited after saying goodbye to a fair number of characters in 2019 following the conclusion of "Avengers: Endgame," many in the Asian community are thrilled to finally see the first superhero who looks like them headlining a film of their own.  "When that announcement came out, I just went instantly back to my childhood," director Destin Daniel Cretton told Entertainment Weekly of the film’s...
    Marvel Studios dropped a teaser trailer Monday for “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.” In the clip posted on YouTube, the Mandarin discusses how it is time for the son to fulfill his destiny after his offspring was trained so the “most dangerous people in the world” couldn’t kill him. (REVIEW: ‘The Mandalorian’ On Disney+ Is A Must Watch Show For ‘Star Wars’ Fans) “Son, it’s time for you to take your place by my side,” the Mandarin explained. Before he told his grown child, who seems to be fighting his destiny, “You can’t outrun who you really are.” WATCH: The latest superhero film stars Canadian actor Simu Liu as a martial artist who has been trained “to be an assassin since childhood by the Ten Rings terror organization,” only to escape that life to be a normal person living in San Francisco, The Hollywood Reporter reported. (RELATED: Disney Releases New Clip Of ‘WandaVision’ With A Reference To ‘The Avengers’) The movie, directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, is the first Asian superhero film and embodies Asian and...
    CNN used the wrong photo of a professional Asian golfer during a story over the weekend about The Masters golf tournament. The headline read, “Si Woo Kim Breaks Putter In Frustration, Forced To Putt With Wood At The Masters.” Included in the post was an feature image of a professional golfer, but the pictured athlete wasn’t Kim, but instead fellow competitor Sungjae Im, Fox News reported in a piece published Monday. Im and Kim are both golfers from South Korea who were competing in The Masters tournament. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) Here is a picture of Si Woo Kim on the second hole during the final round of the Masters at Augusta National Golf Club. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images) And below is a picture of the Sungjae Im during the first round of the Masters in Augusta, Georgia. (RELATED: Tiger Woods Says He’s Undergone Back Surgery, Focused On ‘Getting Back Out On Tour’) (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images) The mistake came just days after the news outlet had published a...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) — The San Francisco security guard who took down the suspect in the attack against an elderly Asian woman on Market Street last month on Friday told KPIX in an exclusive interview how the incident went down. Samba Guisse works as a security guard in the Civic Center area. He was on the scene when assault suspect Steven Jenkins hit 76-year-old Chinese grandmother Xiao Zhen Xie out of nowhere. READ MORE: Oakland Police Investigating 3 Homicides, 32 Robberies Amid Recent Surge in Violent Crime ALSO READ: Public Defender Says Attack on Elderly Asian Woman in San Francisco Not Racially Motivated Xie garnered international attention after using a wooden board to fight off Jenkins. Video taken at the scene by KPIX 5 Sports Director Dennis O’Donnell that showed the aftermath of the attack went viral. To date, his original video post on Twitter has been viewed over 3.4 million times. Just came upon an attack on an elderly Asian woman on Market Street San Francisco. Effort I got more details pic.twitter.com/5o8r0eeHE2 — Dennis ODonnell (@DennisKPIX) March 17, 2021...
    Jason Redmond/Getty The Asian American and Pacific Islander community continues to combat racism and hate crimes after years of discrimination. Insider wants our AAPI readers to tell us why they're proud of their heritage. Call us at (646) 376-6075 to share your thoughts with Insider. We may contact you to hear more. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. This past year was a gut-wrenching one for the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. Pandemic struggles, coupled with a surge of racist violence, struck Asian families. But we remain stronger than ever. More than 1,800 New Yorkers, many of whom speak Mandarin and Cantonese, have volunteered to walk Asian Americans from any public area to their destination in an effort to combat anti-Asian violence. Organizations like Stop AAPI Hate, Hate is a Virus, and Asian Americans Advancing Justice, provide resources and funds to combat anti-Asian racism. One woman in New York has raised more than $100,000 to fund cab rides for her Asian neighbors. And AAPI lawmakers are pushing for bills designated to prevent anti-Asian hate crimes. These...
    Hong Kong (CNN Business)It's not just on the streets, and it's not just in America. Asians around the world are experiencing discrimination, and many of them say this is happening at work.From being explicitly harassed by colleagues to seemingly minor transgressions, such as getting excluded from business activities, people can experience bias in various ways at the workplace.During the pandemic, some Asian-owned businesses have also been vandalized or hit especially hard, in part due to suspected prejudice. And in the United States, Asian Americans have faced historic unemployment, with workers in the community disproportionately affected by the jobs crisis.We want to hear how the recent surge in anti-Asian hate has affected you personally over the past year. Have you, or your loved ones, felt targeted or excluded at work, or while looking for work?Share your story in the form below for possible inclusion in an upcoming project.
    SAN JOSE (KPIX 5) — The good Samaritan who helped a young woman being attacked at San Jose’s Diridon train station — an assault that’s been charged as a hate crime — says he was in the wrong place at the exact right moment. Brandon Haas said he fell asleep on the train and missed his stop. When he got off the train in San Jose he heard a woman screaming — fear, terror and desperation evident in her calls for help. READ MORE: Fremont Police Officer Involved In Deadly Shooting Following Chase on Hwy 84 “I was going down the steps to the tunnel and I heard a woman yelling — shrieking,” Haas told KPIX 5. Brandon Haas stopped an attempted sexual assault and hate crime at Diridon Station in San Jose on March 10, 2021. (CBS) Haas says he rounded the corner and saw the victim flat on her back being pulled by the suspect by her hair. “She had told me that the man had come up with a chokehold behind her and brought her down to...
    Though incidents of anti-Asian hate crimes are on the rise, racism against the Asian community is nothing new. We’d like to tell the stories of the generation of Asian Americans who were born before 1970. We want to talk to you about your memories of growing up and raising a family. We want to explore the idea of feeling like a “foreigner” and to learn about your feelings around recent attacks on the Asian community. If you or someone you know would like to take part, fill out our short survey and briefly tell us about your experience.
    By CAMILLE FASSETT, Associated Press/Report for America SANTA CRUZ, Calif. (AP) — The redwood forests of the Santa Cruz Mountains had not burned in decades. But they burned the year I lived there. Aug. 18, 2020, will be forever ingrained in my mind, not only as the date on which I found myself displaced from my home by wildfire, but also the day I became a different kind of reporter — one covering the blaze that threatened my own community. Sometimes, you are in the right position at the right time to the best suited reporter to cover a story — even if it isn’t your beat, and even if you’ve never covered anything related before. My partner and I had spent the afternoon by the bay, miles from the San Lorenzo Valley. Of course, the wildfire season had already touched our lives as they did across California. Most of the state experienced poor air quality and heavy smoke from a number of fires. We knew there was fire at Butano State Park that day, but we did not anticipate...
    Naomi Tacuyan Underwood, executive director of the Asian American Journalists Association, couldn’t help feeling pure “rage” as early television reports of Tuesday’s mass murders in Atlanta began to dominate the news cycle. In addition to her anger directed at the 21-year-old white suspect—who allegedly shot and killed eight people, including six women of Asian descent, at three local spas and massage parlors—Underwood’s ire was aimed at the largely white media narrative that his supposed motive was sexual addiction and a perverse effort to eradicate temptation, not racist hate amid a horrific increase over the past year to nearly 3,800 incidents of verbal attacks and physical assaults in the United States against people of Asian descent. Underwood and other critics of this week’s news coverage ascribed the initial mainstream media skepticism that the massacre could have been a hate crime—not to mention an outright denial of that possibility by various Fox News personalities—to the relative absence of Asian journalists’ perspective among many of the outlets that reported on the killings. “I think where my rage is personally is the fact that...
    The P.C. police have come for the Hollywood Reporter. On Monday, the entertainment outlet tweeted a headline meant to celebrate the fact that this year’s Oscars nominations feature more actors of Asian descent than ever before in the event’s 92-year history, including Steven Yeun and Youn Yuh-jung for “Minari,” Riz Ahmed for “The Sound of Metal,” and director Chloe Zhao for “Nomadland.” Screenwriter Lee Isaac Chung and producer Christina Oh have also been nominated for their work in “Minari.” “Diverse Field Sees Asian Actors Shatter a Bamboo Ceiling,” the original headline read. The accompanying story was tweeted out on Monday morning, but quickly elicited cringes across the internet. It was “ratio’ed” by followers with a mere 800 likes before noon, but more than 3,700 retweets — and counting — which point to the “problematic” headline, as one critic put it. “Are you guys out of your minds?” asked comedian Niccole Thurman. “Please change this offensive headline,” urged entertainment writer Jason Fraley. “The Sound of Metal” star Riz Ahmed has also become the first Muslim man to be nominated for...
    At this point, it is unclear exactly how Apple decides which terms its parental controls should disallow access to. For better or worse though, Apple didn’t do a very thorough job enforcing these particular content restrictions. If you search for the word “Asian” — or one of many related terms — in Google, Bing, DuckDuckGo or even Baidu, your browser will tell you you can’t browse the page because “it is restricted.” That’s true whether you type a search query into your mobile browser’s address bar, or if you navigate to a search engine’s homepage and attempt the search from there. Strangely, Yahoo is the only search engine available Apple offers as a default option in Safari that handles these searches correctly. (Full disclosure: Verizon owns Yahoo and News Brig and in no way affected how we approached this story; this is all just a really weird coincidence.) Perhaps most concerning is the fact that literally none of this is new news. The Independent’s report cites a recent tweet from iOS developer Steven Shen, who — before tweeting about the...
    In one scene from the Lifetime TV movie, “A Sugar & Spice Holiday,” a co-worker says to Suzy, an Asian American architect in Los Angeles: “I didn’t know if Christmas was a big deal where you’re from.” Retorts Suzy: “I’m from Maine.” A lot of viewers of a cozy Christmas film might just shrug off the insinuation that Suzy is somehow not American. But for an Asian audience, that brief exchange is a knowing reminder that microaggressions don’t take a holiday. They especially haven’t in the wake of the pandemic, which has triggered anti-Asian racism and terms like “Chinese virus” and “kung flu.” “I think it’s great timing for us for this movie to be coming out now during the pandemic with the perception of the Asian culture and the ‘flu’ and all,” Canadian actor Jacky Lai, who plays Suzy, told The Associated Press. “I really do hope that this (movie) — with our faces — is able to hopefully be welcomed by people into their homes and see us as just your American/Canadian friends.” “A Sugar & Spice Holiday,”...
    (CNN)Early in the lockdown, my 6-year-old was on his scooter zipping away in front of me on our quiet Seattle neighborhood street when I sensed a car coming from behind. I called out for my child to stop, but under his bright helmet painted with a cartoon lion, he couldn't hear me. Michelle YangI expected the car to slow, but instead, it sped up. I screamed, helpless. Any parent would be scared, but news headlines about hate crimes against Asian Americans during the Covid-19 pandemic rushed through my mind, flashing images of seniors assaulted and children stabbed at a store. Luckily for us, the car stopped in time, but it was far too close for comfort. Was it a threat, a joke, or simply bad driving? I would never know. But that incident was the last time our only child was allowed on a scooter for months. Our family decided afterward that it would be unsafe for our son and me to be out without a second adult, further isolating ourselves in an already lonely time.It's so hard for...
    Sway House member Nick Bean is receiving backlash following an allegedly racist video of him doing what appears to be the “fox eye.” Hide The video, which was uploaded on Bryce Hall’s recent Instagram story, shows the content creator using two of his fingers to push the sides of his eyes upward. Shortly after the story was posted, people began accusing Bean of doing the “fox eye”—a discriminatory trend in which people stretch their eyes to mimic or mock the Asian eye shape.  Hide The story was reposted on @tiktokinsiders, an Instagram account that posts trending TikTok drama and news. In a comment that has now received over 800 likes, one user said that his actions highlight how normalized discrimination is against the Asian community: “Him doing it and Bryce recording n putting it on his story just shows just how much normalized racism against Asians really is.” View this post on Instagram -sent in alot- people are not very happy with #nickbean doing the ‘Fox Eye’???? A post shared by tiktokinsiders
    (CNN)Sen. Kamala Harris -- who is of Indian and Jamaican descent -- challenges our understanding of what it means to be Asian American. It is for this reason that her historic vice presidential nomination is so impactful. Pawan DhingraAmong the Democratic presidential candidates, Andrew Yang was often cast as the sole Asian American, despite Harris' background and Tulsi Gabbard's Samoan heritage. Yang, a Taiwanese-American entrepreneur, often leaned into the "model minority" stereotype by wearing a "Math" lapel pin, and making joking comments like, "I am Asian, so I know a lot of doctors." His platform was also based on the belief that individuals can overcome challenging circumstances less through solidarity with other groups and more from personal decision making along with at least some government support. Harris, on the other hand, does not fit the Asian American image so readily. Americans of South Asian descent are often overlooked as Asian American, and being biracial still challenges people's conceptions of race. For her own part, Harris has not shied away from her Indian heritage, but she never made her Asian heritage...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The NYPD has formed a new task force to fight an increase in hate crimes against Asian Americans. Police say there have been 21 hate crimes against Asian Americans reported since March. Seventeen of those led to arrests. RELATED STORY: March Against Hate Crimes Targeting Asian Americans Held In Manhattan The NYPD says the attacks, both verbal and physical, are being fueled by anti-Asian rhetoric about the coronavirus. “This hit home for me because I have friends, families, who are legitimately afraid to go outside because they fear for their safety,” said NYPD Deputy Inspector Stewart Loo. RELATED STORY: Volunteers Band Together To Keep Community Safe With Racist Attacks Against Asian Americans On The Rise The task force will be made up of 25 Asian-American investigators who speak different languages. The NYPD says cultural barriers often prevent victims from reporting attacks and cooperating with police. You can get the latest news, sports and weather on our brand new CBS New York app. Download here.
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