Thursday, Aug 11, 2022 - 07:59:17
408 results - (0.007 seconds)

Court’s work:

latest news at page 1:
    GARY Neville was today dragged into Ryan Giggs' court case as Whatsapp messages and emails were read to the jury. His former Manchester United team mate is accused of hounding and blackmailing Kate Greville, 38, over a three-year period of abuse. 7Gary Neville was dragged into Ryan Giggs' court case today, referred to in messages read out in courtCredit: Getty 7Giggs pictured arriving at Manchester Crown Court where he is accused of controlling and coercive behaviour against ex-girlfriend Kate GrevilleCredit: PA 7Kate Greville referred to messages Giggs had sent her in court todayCredit: Tim Stewart Ms Greville told the court how Giggs promised her kids and demanded sex all the time while he was dating eight other women. She also alleged he once headbutted her and nearly split her lip open after refusing to give her her phone. Meanwhile, emails dating from early 2019, exchanged between Kate Greville's old work laptop and Ryan Giggs' mobile phone, made reference to Gary Neville who was part of a work Whatsapp group with the pair. Ms Greville said she had blocked...
    President Joe Biden's nominee to the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Rachel Bloomekatz, is deadlocked in a vote by the Senate Judiciary Committee after Republicans were critical of her past work on gun control-related cases during her confirmation hearing. The committee tied in a 10-10 vote Thursday that was divided evenly between Democratic and Republican members. The deadlock will only prolong her confirmation process by requiring the full Senate to hold an extra vote to move her nomination forward. Bloomekatz‘s history as a co-counsel with Everytown for Gun Safety in several cases was criticized by committee members Sens. John Kennedy (R-LA) and Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) during her June confirmation hearing. BIDEN NOMINATES DC JUDGE TO SUCCEED KETANJI BROWN JACKSON ON APPEALS COURT Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) listens during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP) Blackburn argued the gun control organization opposes "constitutional carry," and Kennedy inquired whether Bloomekatz supports the political leanings of Everytown. "I believe, senator, that, as a nominee to the federal bench, it would be inappropriate to express...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Two of the Supreme Court justices who disagree most often on the outcomes of cases say they both still try hard to persuade each other, and sometimes succeed. Justice Sonia Sotomayor and Justice Amy Coney Barrett made the comments in a pretaped conversation made public for the first time Thursday evening. Barrett, a conservative, and Sotomayor, a liberal, were on opposite sides of a decision last month in which the court stripped away women’s constitutional protections for abortion. They also disagreed on decisions where the court expanded gun rights and lowered barriers to religion in public life. But, noted Barrett at one point: “We like each other. We do.” “I think one of the wonders of being on the Supreme Court is my knowing that every single one of my colleagues is equally passionate about the Constitution, our system of government and getting it right as I am. We may disagree on how to get there, and we often do, but that doesn’t mean that I look at them and say, ‘You’re bad people.’ I accept that...
    BERLIN (AP) — Germany’s highest court said Wednesday it has thrown out complaints against a ban on the use of subcontractors in slaughterhouses that was prompted by coronavirus outbreaks early in the pandemic. The Federal Constitutional Court said it rejected complaints by a sausage manufacturer and several temporary employment agencies against the new rules, which went into force at the beginning of last year. They require companies to use their own work force to slaughter animals and process meat, with temporary work being restricted and phased out over a three-year period and exceptions only for companies with up to 49 employees. The use of subcontractors, which was common in the German meat industry, often involved migrant workers living in cramped communal housing and being transported to slaughterhouses in minibuses — heightening the risk of infection when the COVID-19 pandemic hit. A major slaughterhouse outbreak prompted a regional lockdown in western Germany in mid-2020. The federal court said the sausage company complained of inequality of treatment with other industries, while the employment agencies argued that the new rules violated their...
    Lara Prescott wrote the 2019 bestseller The Secrets We Kept and is now working on a second novel - but she says the court case has caused her so much stress she may never write about real historical figures again A US novelist embroiled in a £2million plagiarism lawsuit copied the work of Boris Pasternak's great niece at least 44 times, the High Court was told today. British journalist Anna Pasternak is suing Lara Prescott over claims she stole important parts of a book she wrote about her Russian poet uncle's iconic novel - Dr Zhivago - from her biography. Ms Prescott wrote the 2019 bestseller The Secrets We Kept by taking parts of Ms Pasternak's work Lara: The Untold Love Story And The Inspiration For Doctor Zhivago, it is alleged.  Both books explore the story behind Dr Zhivago, Pasternak's most famous work and the subject of David Lean's 1965 blockbuster of the same title, starring Julie Christie and Omar Sharif.  The character of Lara Antipova - who Ms Prescott is named after - is widely believed to be inspired by...
    A SHELF stacker at SportsDirect having an affair with her manager tried to hire a hitman to kill a colleague - when she TOO started bedding their boss, a court heard. Whitney Franks, 26, secretly dated married dad James Prest for over a year after the pair met at the Milton Keynes branch of the sports giant. 2Whitney Franks is on trial today accused of soliciting a hitman to murder a former work colleague at Sports DirectCredit: Hyde News & Pictures 2James Press was allegedly seeing both co-workers - causing Ms Franks to become 'rampantly jealous'Credit: Hyde News & Pictures But when co-worker Ruut Ruutna joined the store, she started romping with Mr Prest behind his original mistress’ back, it is said. Suspicious Franks "followed" Press - believing him to be secretly seeing Ms Ruutna at night. The affair left her so "rampantly jealous" she went onto the dark web and tried to hire a hitman for £1,000, using crypto-currency. She posted Ms Ruutna's home address and Facebook profile and requested: 'I'm looking for the murder of a woman. I...
    Retired Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer is joining Harvard's faculty as a professor, the university announced Friday. Breyer, 83, a graduate of Harvard Law School, announced he would be appointed as the Byrne professor of administrative law and process. His appointment will be effective immediately. SENATE CONFIRMS JUDGE KETANJI BROWN JACKSON AS NEXT SUPREME COURT JUSTICE "I am very pleased to return to Harvard to teach there and to write. Among other things, I will likely try to explain why I believe it important that the next generations of those associated with the law engage in work, and take approaches to law, that help the great American constitutional experiment work effectively for the American people," Breyer said in a statement. In his new role, he will "teach seminars and reading groups, continue to write books and produce scholarship, and participate in the intellectual life of the school and in the broader Harvard community," the statement from Harvard read. Breyer previously worked for Harvard, joining its faculty in 1967 and remaining there until 1980. Former President...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Retired Justice Stephen Breyer is getting a different title: professor. Harvard said Friday that Breyer, who retired from the Supreme Court June 30, is re-joining its law school faculty. Breyer is a graduate of the law school and first joined the Harvard faculty in 1967. He continued to teach at Harvard after he became a federal appeals court judge in 1980 until former President Bill Clinton nominated him to the Supreme Court in 1994. Harvard said in a statement that Breyer will “teach seminars and reading groups, continue to write books and produce scholarship, and participate in the intellectual life of the school and in the broader Harvard community.” Breyer, 83, does not yet have any classes listed in Harvard’s online course catalog. However, the school said his appointment as Byrne Professor of Administrative Law and Process would be effective immediately. Breyer is a longtime expert in administrative law, the law surrounding government agencies, and co-authored a textbook on the subject. Harvard’s announcement included a statement from Breyer. “I am very pleased to return to Harvard to...
    A women’s group is vying for the state of Tennessee to change its rules about admitting recently relocated lawyers to the State Bar Association, claiming that the current rules are not amenable to mothers who wish to work part-time. State Bar Associations often have agreements with other states allowing reciprocity for lawyers who relocate to be admitted to the Bar in their new state. Tennessee’s State Bar requires that the attorney seeking admission worked five out of the seven years prior to moving to Tennessee as a full-time lawyer. The rule promulgates the exclusion of attorneys who are also mothers, who perhaps have only worked part-time because they are raising a child. “The difference between a lawyer practicing full-time and part-time is the number of hours she works, not her expertise, experience, or skill. Often the hours gap is small. It is time to think about a women’s agenda that gives women more opportunities to pursue the life they want to live,” said Karin Lips, the President of Network of Enlightened Women (NeW). “For many women, that means part-time work....
    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. climate envoy John Kerry said Friday that setbacks for President Joe Biden’s climate efforts at home have “slowed the pace” of some of the commitments from other countries to cut climate-wrecking fossil fuels, but he insisted the U.S. would still achieve its own ambitious climate goals in time. Kerry spoke to The Associated Press after a major Supreme Court ruling Thursday limited the Environmental Protection Agency’s options for regulating climate pollution from power plants. The ruling raised the prospect the conservative-controlled court could go on to hinder other efforts by the executive branch to cut the country’s coal, oil and gas emissions. It came after Democrats failed in getting what was to be Biden’s signature climate legislation through the narrowly divided Senate. The Biden administration is striving now to show audiences at home and abroad that the U.S. can still make significant climate progress, and strike deals with other countries to do the same. Scientists say only a few years are left to stave off the worst levels of global warming. Kerry, Biden’s climate negotiator abroad,...
    by Evan Stambaugh   Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz claimed that a whole host of “rights,” such as “women’s rights to work in the workplace,” may be targeted following the Supreme Court’s reversal of Roe v. Wade. At a Tuesday press conference discussing the “future” of abortion with Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, Walz stressed the importance of ensuring continued abortion access in Minnesota, vowing that the state will never curtail it under his leadership. “I know that there are millions across this state who are watching this decision closely,” Walz said. “If you’re one of those people, if you’re a father like I am of a 21-year-old daughter who wonders what’s next: contraception, marriage equality, women’s rights to work in the workplace, equal pay, all of the things …” “This move takes us back, and all of those rights are at risk,” he added. Walz’s remarks likely allude to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas’ concurring opinion in the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health case that upheld Mississippi’s abortion ban and overruled Roe v. Wade. Thomas wrote that the Court would do well to “reconsider”...
    By MARK SHERMAN WASHINGTON (AP) — Ketanji Brown Jackson was sworn in to the Supreme Court on Thursday, shattering a glass ceiling as the first Black woman on the nation’s highest court. The 51-year-old Jackson is the court’s 116th justice, and she took the place of the justice she once worked for. Justice Stephen Breyer’s retirement took effect at noon. Moments later, joined by her family, Jackson recited the two oaths required of Supreme Court justices, one administered by Breyer and the other by Chief Justice John Roberts. “With a full heart, I accept the solemn responsibility of supporting and defending the Constitution of the United States and administering justice without fear or favor, so help me God,” Jackson said in a statement issued by the court. “I am truly grateful to be part of the promise of our great Nation. I extend my sincerest thanks to all of my new colleagues for their warm and gracious welcome.” Roberts welcomed Jackson “to the court and our common calling.” The ceremony was streamed live on the court’s website. Jackson, a federal...
    The Supreme Court said in a 5-4 ruling Wednesday that state agencies are not immune from private lawsuits brought under a federal law meant to protect employment rights of returning veterans. The ruling will strengthen work protections for thousands of state-employed veterans returning to work after service in the Reserves or National Guard. Le Roy Torres, a veteran and former employee of the Texas Department of Public Safety, had said he could no longer serve as a state trooper and sought a comparable job to accommodate his service-related disability. When he was denied the job, he filed suit under federal law but lost in state courts. He appealed the decision to the Supreme Court. This is a breaking story and will be updated. The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.
    (CNN)Just days after the Supreme Court sent shock waves through the nation with its decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, the ripple effects are continuing to hit communities big and small as protesters march, politicians maneuver and activists mull legal options as the federal constitutional right to an abortion has ended.A fourth day of demonstrations is planned Monday in several locations across the US following a weekend of packed protests decrying the loss of a nearly 50-year-old legal protection, while some gatherings celebrated the ruling.At least 10 states have effectively banned abortion since Friday's ruling, and in all, 26 states have laws indicating they could outlaw or set extreme limits on abortions, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization which supports abortion rights.Demonstrations against the ruling have been largely peaceful, but a few arrests have been reported. Photos: Americans react after Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadeAmanda Conticello participates in the "We Dissent" protest on Sunday, June 26, in Stuart, Florida. Hide Caption 1 of 30 Photos: Americans react after Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadeAnti-abortion protesters gather outside...
    The Catholic Bishops of New York issued a statement Friday on the Supreme Court’s Dobbs decision, declaring that the historic ruling “will save countless innocent children simply waiting to be born.” “We give thanks to God for today’s decision of the United States Supreme Court in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization,” reads the statement, signed by Cardinal Timothy Dolan and seven of his brother bishops from New York state. In their statement, the bishops express their gratitude to “the millions of heroic Americans who have worked tirelessly toward this outcome for nearly a half-century” and who have been “a charitable and compelling voice for the voiceless.” “With the entire pro-life community, we are overjoyed with this outcome of the Court,” the bishops said while calling on the pro-life community to be charitable to those who do not share their convictions, “even as we celebrate an important historical moment and an answer to a prayer.” Cardinal Timothy Dolan celebrates Mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral on June 28, 2020, in New York City. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images) The bishops also...
    The Supreme Court ruled to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision Friday morning and some of the research used in this decision was 'wrongly interpreted.' The claim comes from Giandomenico Iannetti, a pain expert at the University College London, who accused US lawyers of misusing his work on the brain to support their anti-abortion stance The claim comes from Giandomenico Iannetti, a pain expert at the University College London, who accused US lawyers of misusing his work on the brain to support their anti-abortion stance. Iannetti's work focuses on pain in the brain, specifically how the brain responds to pain, and his 2010 research was 'misinterpreted' in a study paper on fetal pain published in the Journal of Medical Ethics in 2020 by Dr. Stuart Derbyshire, a British associate professor of psychology at the National University of Singapore. Derbyshire's paper claims recent evidence suggests the cerebral cortex, the region responsible for high-level processes, is not needed to feel pain – and he cites Iannetti's brain research to support the theory. The cerebral cortex does not develop in the...
    Shortly after the Orlando Magic concluded their draft night Thursday, which included taking Paolo Banchero with the No. 1 pick, the attention started to shift towards their summer league plans. They won’t include second-year guard Jalen Suggs. Suggs, the No. 5 pick in last year’s draft, had surgery in late April to address a “slight” stress fracture in his right ankle. Magic president of basketball operations Jeff Weltman told the Orlando Sentinel Thursday evening that Suggs is no longer wearing a boot and is “doing well.” Suggs told the Orlando Sentinel Friday he started doing on-court work again this past week. “Jalen got his boot off and he’s ramping up his recovery”, Weltman added. Weltman also provided an update on Jonathan Isaac, who had surgery after a “minor right hamstring injury” he suffered in mid-March while rehabilitating the torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee that forced him to miss the previous two seasons. “Jonathan’s still kind of catching up from his last procedure,” Weltman said. “He’s doing well. He’s doing half-court iso work. He’s progressing well. He’ll take...
    Former President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the constitutional right to abortion on Friday. Trump told Fox News: 'This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago.' When asked about how is reaction would go down among his supporters who are pro-choice, Trump said: 'I think, in the end, this is something that will work out for everybody. This brings everything back to the states where it has always belonged.' Famously, despite not winning the popular vote, serving one term as president and being impeached twice, Trump was afforded three picks on the Supreme Court.  The former president said in an interview with Fox News that 'God' made the decision to overturn Roe v Wade Trump was asked about his influence on the June 2022 decision, he replied: 'God made the decision.'  While on the campaign trail in 2016, Trump promised his supporters that he was committed to appointing 'pro-life' justices who would work to overturn Roe v Wade. Since 1973, the landmark Roe v Wade decision permitted abortions...
    Washington (CNN)House January 6 committee Chair Bennie Thompson on Thursday said the panel investigating the US Capitol attack has sent a letter to Virginia "Ginni" Thomas asking her to speak with them about her role in the effort to overturn the 2020 electoral results.Thomas, a conservative activist and the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, appears open to speaking with the committee, telling conservative outlet The Daily Caller that she "can't wait to clear up misconceptions.""I look forward to talking to them," she said in the interview published Thursday.The panel's request follows revelations late Wednesday that the committee is in possession of email correspondence between Thomas and conservative attorney John Eastman, according to a source familiar with the committee. What to know about Ginni Thomas connection to 2020 election reversal gambitsThe source who spoke with CNN would not provide details on the emails' contents or say if they were direct messages between the two or part of a larger group correspondence. A separate source said the emails were part of a tranche of messages provided to the committee after...
    by J.D. Davidson   The Ohio Supreme Court will hear a case challenging the state’s municipal income tax code that allowed cities to levy taxes on workers who did not live or work in those communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. The court agreed to hear The Buckeye Institute’s case of Schaad v. Adler, one of five the Columbus-based policy group filed relating municipal income tax collection. “For more than 70 years, the Ohio Supreme Court has recognized that the Constitution prohibits local governments from taxing the income of individuals who neither live nor perform work in the taxing city – and, yes, the constitution applies even during a global pandemic,” said Robert Alt, president and chief executive officer of The Buckeye Institute and one of the lawyers representing Schaad. “The Ohio Supreme Court finally has the opportunity to correct this Orwellian system in which the state forced people to work from home under threat of criminal penalties, but then also absurdly deemed that same work to have been performed where it wasn’t – often in higher-taxed office locations.” Even...
    Mario Tama/Getty Images A New York State Supreme Court judge dismissed on Wednesday a sexual assault suit against former ABC News executive producer Michael Corn. The Los Angeles Times first reported the news on Wednesday. Kirstyn Crawford, a former ABC News staffer and the plaintiff, filed the lawsuit claiming Corn “allegedly forcibly touched and kissed [her] during an Uber trip back to their hotel after a party the night before the [Oscars],” reported the Times, citing the 2021 lawsuit. Additionally, according to the publication, “Crawford also claimed that Corn withheld a raise and promotion and described various situations where he created a hostile work environment in retaliation for rebuffing his alleged sexual advances.” “The judge ruled that the incidents cited by Ms. Crawford didn’t measure up to sexual harassment or fostering a hostile work environment,” reported The Wall Street Journal’s Joe Flint. “The judge said that some of Mr. Corn’s alleged remarks, ‘while boorish, ill-advised, and inappropriate, do not create a hostile work environment, much less a continuing violation.’” Corn served as executive producer and Crawford as a producer for...
    The third pillar of our esteemed federal system is entering a chaotic phase as the investigation heats up into the premature and embarrassing leak of Justice Samuel Alito’s draft opinion that overrules Roe v. Wade. The focus at present is on the individual justices’ law clerks—the folks who actually do the lion’s share of the research and writing that informs the court’s learned pronouncements. As CNN’s Joan Biskupic reports, apparently no one has yet copped to sending the Alito screed to Politico, despite what had to have been a tense meeting with Chief Justice John Roberts, who is busy watching his judicial legacy circle the bowl. Supreme Court officials are escalating their search for the source of the leaked draft opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade, taking steps to require law clerks to provide cell phone records and sign affidavits, three sources with knowledge of the efforts have told CNN. Some clerks are apparently so alarmed over the moves, particularly the sudden requests for private cell data, that they have begun exploring whether to hire outside counsel. The fact that no one...
    BRONX, New York (WABC) -- Some stores were put on lockdown after firecrackers were set off at a mall in the Bronx Saturday.Police say the incident happened around 1:30 p.m.They say somebody set off firecrackers by the food court area.There's no word yet on any injuries.MORE NEWS: Mayor sends stern letter to NYC employees: 'Report to work in person'EMBED More News Videos Mayor Eric Adams' office sent a stern letter to New York City's employees reminding them they must return to work in person. Some stores were put on lockdown as a result.This is breaking news. This story will be updated as more information becomes available.----------* More Bronx news* Send us a news tip* Download the abc7NY app for breaking news alerts * Follow us on YouTube Submit a News Tip
    Gov. Gavin Newsom’s big idea to tackle California’s homelessness problem is a new program to provide court-ordered treatment for homeless residents with severe mental illness. The governor wants lawmakers to act quickly to pass the plan, which would target up to 12,000 residents who need the most help. On this episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast,” we delve into the details of the plan and why many civil liberties advocates are concerned that it would deprive homeless residents of their rights. Our guest is Los Angeles Times staff writer Hannah Wiley, who has been writing about the governor’s idea, known as CARE Court, since it was unveiled earlier this year. Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Pod · Gimme Shelter: A breakdown of Gov. Gavin Newsom’s CARE Court proposal “Gimme Shelter,” a biweekly podcast that looks at why it’s so expensive to live in California and what the state can do about it, features Liam Dillon, who covers housing affordability issues for the Los Angeles Times, and Manuela Tobías, housing reporter for CalMatters. You can subscribe to...
    ▶ Watch Video: Federal judge to rule on Title 42 immigration law Asylum and questions about who should be granted humanitarian protection have become focal points of the contentious debate over U.S. immigration policy and how the government should respond to unprecedented levels of migrant arrivals at the southern border. During the COVID-19 pandemic, asylum processing along the U.S.-Mexico border has been partially suspended because of an emergency measure known as Title 42. But some migrants are being allowed to seek asylum. Other migrants don’t seek asylum at all. And not all asylum-seekers enter through the southern border. While a federal judge has blocked the Biden administration from lifting Title 42 for now, the challenges the U.S. asylum system has faced for years — from a massive backlog of applications and yearslong processing times, to inconsistent policies and operational constraints — have continued to intensify. The Biden administration this week started enforcing a rule it hopes will reform the asylum system and speed up case processing. But the policy will start on a limited scale and its success remains an...
    WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Poland’s controversial disciplinary chamber for the country’s top court on Monday changed its own previous ruling and ordered an outspoken judge reinstated to work. The decision comes as Poland’s leaders are urgently debating abolishing the Disciplinary Chamber of the Supreme Court, which has been a sore point in Poland’s relations with the European Union and an obstacle in obtaining much-needed EU funds for pandemic recovery. A draft law by President Andrzej Duda on the topic could be debated in parliament this week. The right-wing government, which is pursuing a generous social policy and extending aid to hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian war refugees, is seeking ways to reach an accord with the EU on the issue of the judiciary and obtain the frozen billions of euros. The EU said it was a breach of the rule of law and launched sanctioning steps after Poland’s government used the disciplinary chamber to sanction and suspend judges who had been critical of the changes it made to the judiciary. One of the judges, Pawel Juszczyszyn, was...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Virginia “Ginni” Thomas, wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and a conservative political activist, urged Republican lawmakers in Arizona after the 2020 presidential election to choose their own slate of electors, arguing that results giving Joe Biden a victory in the state were marred by fraud. The revelations first published by The Washington Post on Friday show that Thomas was more involved than previously known in efforts, based on unsubstantiated claims of fraud, to overturn Biden’s victory and keep then-President Donald Trump in office. In the days after The Associated Press and other news organizations called the presidential election for Biden, Thomas emailed two lawmakers in Arizona to urge them to choose “a clean slate of Electors” and “stand strong in the face of political and media pressure.” The AP obtained the emails under the state’s open records law. Thomas also had written to then-White House chief of staff Mark Meadows in the weeks following the election encouraging him to work to overturn Biden’s victory and Trump in office, according to text messages first reported...
    The people who run America’s abortion clinics agree: There’s no job like it. There are the clients — so many of them desperate, in need, grateful. There are the abortion opponents — passionate, relentless, often furious. And hovering over it all are legal challenges, and the awareness that your clinic may be just a judicial ruling away from extinction. That reality became more urgent last week with a leaked, draft opinion from the U.S. Supreme Court suggesting a majority of justices support overturning the 1973 Roe vs Wade decision legalizing abortion. If that happens it could spell the end of abortion in about half the states. The Associated Press talked with three women and one man who run abortion clinics in such states about their work. Some came to the work through personal brushes with abortion; for others it started as a job. For all, it has become a calling. ___ SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA — When Kathaleen Pittman was growing up in a small, conservative community in rural Louisiana, abortion was not openly discussed. When she started working at the...
    WASHINGTON, DC – Chief Justice John Roberts ordered an investigation on Tuesday into the shocking violation of the court’s rules by someone leaking Justice Samuel Alito’s draft opinion that upholds abortion restrictions by overruling Roe v. Wade. The unprecedented leak rocked the nation, as one of the few people – perhaps 45 – who had access to Alito’s draft majority opinion after it was circulated to the other justices. The court’s press office acknowledged that the draft opinion is authentic but that the opinion is not an opinion of the court with force of law because it, at this stage, is still just a draft by one justice. The court also released a statement issued by the chief justice on this scandal. “To the extent this betrayal of the confidences of the Court was intended to undermine the integrity of our operations, it will not succeed. The work of the Court will not be affected in any way,” Roberts declared. “This was a singular and egregious breach of that trust that is an affront to the Court and the community...
    Chief Justice John Roberts has finally responded to a leaked draft of a Supreme Court opinion that completely and entirely overturns Roe v. Wade: Yes, it is “authentic.” “Although the document described in yesterday’s reports is authentic, it does not represent a decision by the court or the final position of any member on the issues in the case,” a statement from the Court reads. Denouncing the leak as “a singular and egregious breach of that trust that is an affront to the Court and the community of public servants who work here,” Roberts says he has ordered an investigation. But he also presumes to know why the draft opinion was leaked, which is a potentially erroneous position. “To the extent this betrayal of the confidences of the Court was intended to undermine the integrity of our operations, it will not succeed. The work of the Court will not be affected in any way.” The full statement: from Chief Justice Roberts:pic.twitter.com/XV16MSEjYU — West Wing Reports (@West Wing Reports) 1651591644 From Your Site Articles
    A message from the Public Information Office of the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) says a report in German-owned Politico containing a leaked draft of the Court’s opinion to overturn Roe v. Wade is authentic. “Yesterday, a news organization published an opinion in a pending case,” said the statement from the Court. “Justices circulate draft opinions internally as a routine and essential part of the Court’s confidential deliberative work. Although the document described in yesterday’s reports is authentic, it does not represent a decision by the Court or the final position on the issues of the case.” Chief Justice John Roberts called for an investigation into the leak. To the extent this betrayal of confidence of the Court was intended to undermine the integrity of our operations, it will not succeed. The work of the Court will not be affected in any way. We at the Court are blessed to have a workforce – permanent employees and law clerks alike – intensely loyal to the institution and dedicated to the rule of law. Court employees have an exemplary and important...
    Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) lamented on Tuesday the draft Supreme Court decision leaked to Politico that would overturn the landmark 1973 abortion decision Roe v. Wade. “I really find it shocking that this would happen,” said Murkowski, condemning the leak to the outlet, which published its scoop on Monday night. “I understand it is unprecedented.” Regarding the draft decision, “Roe is still the law of the land. We don’t know the direction that this decision may ultimately take, but if it goes in the direction that this leaked copy has indicated I will just tell you that it, it, it rocks my confidence in the court right now.” The draft decision would also overturn the landmark 1992 decision in the Supreme Court abortion case Casey v. Planned Parenthood. Chief Justice John Roberts denounced the leak and said that the draft decision, which he authenticated, isn’t final and that he ordered the Marshal of the court to seek the leaker. “To the extent this betrayal of the confidences of the Court was intended to undermine the integrity of our operations, it will...
    WASHINGTON -- President Joe Biden issued a statement in response to the leak of an apparent draft Supreme Court opinion showing that the panel's conservative majority is ready to overturn nearly 50 years of established abortion rights.He said his administration will work to codify abortion right into law."I believe that a woman's right to choose is fundamental, Roe has been the law of the land for almost fifty years, and basic fairness and the stability of our law demand that it not be overturned," the statement read.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.An apparent draft Supreme Court opinion obtained by Politico shows the panel's conservative majority of justices is ready to overturn nearly 50 years of established abortion rights precedent since Roe v. Wade.The document, which Politico said it obtained from a "person familiar with the court's proceedings," is marked "first draft" and dated Feb. 10, 2022 -- two months after oral arguments were heard in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization. ABC News has not independently confirmed the draft."Roe was...
    WASHIGNTON (AP) — Biden says ‘stability of our law’ demands high court not overrule Roe, he will work to codify abortion right into law. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    A Walmart storefront Walmart, the original big-box vendor based in Bentonville, Arkansas, has always looked for ways to promote its wholesome family image. Sure, there are plenty of stories about Walmart killing communities and small businesses. Boy, though, one thing they did do was offer people with disabilities an opportunity to work as a greeter, right? It was a job that put Americans with disabilities out front and made them visible. Well, it was until 2019; that’s when Walmart cut the greeter position at over 1,000 stores, leaving many disabled staff members without a job.  Before all of that, though, Walmart was a champion for those with disabilities, right? Not if you ask the jury that heard the case of Marlo Spaeth. Spaeth has Down syndrome. After working for almost 16 years at her Walmart location with high performance evaluations for her work, Spaeth was switched to a new position. Because she had difficulty adjusting to her new schedule, Walmart fired her in July 2015. Spaeth asked for a 60-minute adjustment to her new schedule to match her prior work schedule, but the company refused. She asked to be...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – Florida Supreme Court Justice Alan Lawson announced Friday he will retire on Aug. 31, a move that will allow Gov. Ron DeSantis to continue placing his imprint on the state’s highest court. Lawson, who was appointed as a justice in 2016 by former Gov. Rick Scott, will end a 21-year judicial career that also included serving as an Orlando-area circuit judge and a member of the 5th District Court of Appeal. “One of the greatest joys of my 35-year legal career has been and continues to be the ability to work alongside a bench and bar filled with extraordinary individuals who work tirelessly to assure that the citizens we serve are well-served by our system of justice.” Lawson, 60, wrote in a retirement letter to DeSantis. “That system is often criticized yet still endures as the best system of justice that the world has ever seen.” Lawson has been part of a major conservative shift on the Supreme Court during the past three years. That shift was prompted by the retirement in early 2019 of longtime Justices...
    SAN FRANCISCO — A Bay Area man has been indicted on charges of allegedly causing $220,000 in damage to his former employer, a bank, after being fired for allegedly having pornography on his work computer. Miklos “Daniel” Brody, 37, was indicted this month on charges of intentionally damaging a protected computer and obtaining information from a protected computer. He was originally charged last year, but details of the alleged crimes were kept under seal until recently. The criminal complaint, filed in March 2021, says Brody denied knowingly keeping or watching pornography on his work computer and later told a former colleague he thought the firing was “harsh and cruel” especially given the coronavirus pandemic. He also denied hacking his employer’s computer in the days after his termination. Brody’s initial court appearance last year saw him released on an unsecured $25,000 bond. During the hearing, he asked U.S. Magistrate Judge Sallie Kim to carefully explain the court process to him, asking if he could drive around San Francisco or work from home while on pretrial release. He also pleaded to be able...
    Police move flowers placed at a barricade near the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs on Nov. 6, 2017, in Sutherland Springs, Texas. Content warning: This story contains graphic descriptions of sexual assault. While we all know by now that mass shootings are almost always preventable, it’s not often that you can get a court to formally declare this is the case. That’s what happened last summer, when a federal judge held the Air Force responsible for a deadly mass shooting at First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas, in November 2017. Five years earlier, the gunman, Devin Kelley, had pleaded guilty at a court-martial to physically and sexually assaulting his then-wife and cracking his stepson’s skull. If the Air Force had reported this plea to law enforcement outside the military, Kelley would have never been allowed to legally buy the AR-15 clone that he used to kill 26 people and wound 22 others before turning the gun on himself at the church. The bill finally came due for that catastrophic failure on Feb. 7, 2022, when the Air...
    In November 2020, nearly 10 million Californians voted to support Proposition 22, a ballot measure that granted app-based drivers independence in their work while also guaranteeing hourly earnings and other compensation. But nearly a year after its passage, a single court in Alameda County tried to overturn the will of the voters. The California Constitution grants voters the power not only to elect lawmakers but also to pass or overturn laws directly by ballot measure. Our system of governance in the Golden State welcomes robust citizen participation, and citizen-led ballot measures provide opportunities for increased voter input and investment in our democratic process. That’s why it is so disappointing that an Alameda Superior Court judge ruled that Proposition 22 is unconstitutional. This incorrect decision disregards nearly 60% of California voters who cast their ballots in favor of the measure in 2020. Thankfully, Prop. 22 remains in effect while this ruling is appealed. The initiative classified app-based rideshare and food delivery drivers as independent contractors. Companies such as Uber, Lyft and DoorDash have produced innovative new forms of transportation and food-delivery services where...
    Washington (CNN)A federal judge in California has denied the Trump administration's request to continue work on border wall projects in New Mexico and Arizona using Defense Department funds while an appeal is pending."The Court does not find that Defendants are likely to prevail on the merits of their appeal," US District Court Judge Haywood Gilliam wrote. Last week, Gilliam blocked the use of Pentagon funds for parts of the border wall. The administration is appealing that ruling to the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals but asked Gilliam to allow work to continue during the appeal process. Federal judge blocks Trump from using Defense funds for parts of border wall"Unless stayed, the court's injunction will irreparably harm the Government (and the public) by prohibiting the Government from taking critical steps to stop the flow of illegal drugs from entering the country through the southern border," DOJ attorneys wrote in the motion. They argued the Defense Department would be harmed as a result of suspending work because of the costs incurred, which could amount to around $6 million a month....
    (CNN)Shocking atrocities in Ukraine, allegedly at the hands of Russian forces, have amplified calls to pursue war crimes charges against Russian President Vladimir Putin.Images of at least 20 bodies strewn across the street in Bucha, Ukraine, emerged over the weekend following the withdrawal of Russian forces from the area, prompting Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to call for an end to Russian "war crimes."Already, there was a loud and growing chorus of calls for the International Criminal Court to pursue Putin for the unprovoked invasion, and the US government in March formally declared that members of the Russian armed forces have committed war crimes.The top war crimes prosecutor for the ICC has traveled to Ukraine to investigate, and the US Embassy in Kyiv argued in the war's opening days that specific Russian attacks constituted war crimes. JUST WATCHEDInternational Criminal Court to Russia: 'The world is watching'ReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHInternational Criminal Court to Russia: 'The world is watching' 13:43"It is a war crime to attack a nuclear power plant," the embassy said on its official Twitter feed on March 4. "Putin's shelling...
    EVEN after weeks in court, Ed Sheeran can still muster up the energy for a good knees-up, especially when it is with his celebrity pals. I can reveal the superstar celebrated victory in his court case on Wednesday night by throwing a private party at his Notting Hill bar Bertie Blossoms. 13Ed had been accused of copying parts of his hit single Shape Of You 13He celebrated victory in his court case on Wednesday night by throwing a private party at his Notting Hill bar Bertie Blossoms Ed, who had been accused of copying parts of his hit single Shape Of You, was joined by track co-writers Steve Mac and Snow Patrol’s Johnny McDaid, as well as his comic mate John Bishop. A source said: “Ed got the chance to let his hair down and celebrate. “There were about 30 people there in total and everyone had to give a password on the door to be allowed in past the bouncers. “They got there at around 8pm and Ed left about four hours later. Johnny stayed out the latest, heading...
    (L-R) Associate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer | Getty Images Virginia "Ginni" Thomas runs a little-known consulting company that some campaign watchdog groups say could create yet another conflict of interest for her husband, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Ginni Thomas shot to national notoriety after text messages surfaced last month showing that she prodded former President Donald Trump's then chief of staff, Mark Meadows, in late 2020 to try to overturn the presidential election results. The messages prompted calls from top Democrats for Clarence Thomas to recuse himself from cases reviewing the Jan. 6, 2021, riot on Capitol Hill. It's also led to calls by lawmakers on Capitol hill to create a formal Supreme Court code of ethics. The House select committee investigating what took place on Jan. 6 is reportedly seeking an interview with Ginni Thomas. A spokeswoman for the Supreme Court did not return requests for comment. Attempts to reach Ginni Thomas through an email listed...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Through a decades-long career in conservative politics, Virginia Thomas has repeatedly maintained that her political activities posed no conflict of interest with the work of her husband, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. “Like so many married couples, we share many of the same ideals, principles, and aspirations for America,” Thomas said earlier this month in an interview with the right-wing Washington Free Beacon. “But we have our own separate careers, and our own ideas and opinions too. Clarence doesn’t discuss his work with me, and I don’t involve him in my work.” Justice Thomas faces renewed accusations of conflict of interest after revelations that his wife repeatedly urged aides to former President Donald Trump to resist the results of the November 2020 presidential election. A series of text messages between Virginia Thomas — known as Ginni — and former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows show her lobbying Meadows to fight the election results and offering strategic advice on how best to overturn President Joe Biden’s victory. The text exchanges, first reported by The Washington Post...
    Clarence and Ginni Thomas From now on, every Supreme Court decision on which Justice Clarence Thomas is the deciding vote comes with a giant asterisk: This matter was decided by a man whose wife advocated for the overthrow of the government. Those aren’t the only Thomas votes that require the asterisk, though. Take the Supreme Court’s January rejection of Donald Trump’s attempt to block the Jan. 6 select committee from getting White House documents. Thomas was the only dissent on that. Now we know that, during the same period as the White House documents Thomas would not have allowed to be sent to the select committee, his wife, Ginni Thomas, was furiously texting away with then-White House chief of staff Mark Meadows about the need to overturn the election, sending him conspiracy theory videos and texts like, “Do not concede. It takes time for the army who is gathering for [Trump’s] back.” RELATED: Texts between Ginni Thomas, Meadows reveal an extraordinary effort to destroy democracy In late 2021, Trump tried to assert executive privilege over hundreds of pages of documents relating to Jan. 6, even...
    Jurors at the Sarah Lawrence ‘sex cult’ trial heard graphic excerpts from an alleged cult member’s journal in which she boasts of using a strap-on sex toy on a male police officer, saying it was ‘really, really cool. She also described sex work as ‘awesome.’ Claudia Drury, 31, has been on the stand since Friday when she began testifying as one of the prosecution’s key witnesses, telling the court how she unraveled mentally and was coerced into a life of prostitution by defendant Larry Ray. She claimed that the so-called ‘cult leader’ convinced her that she needed to make amends for ‘egregious wrongs’ to which she had confessed and repay more than $100,000 in debt that she owed for destruction to his property. But today, under cross-examination, defense attorney Marne Lenox tried to paint a very different picture. Lead defense attorney Marne Lenox cross-examined Claudia Drury about her graphic journal entries Wednesday   Over the course of three days, alleged victim Drury (left) told the court how Ray (right) allegedly forced her into a life of prostitution, abused her, and...