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    Top Trump White House aide Peter Navarro went on a lengthy rant on MSNBC Thursday evening, promising among other acts to impeach President Joe Biden if the GOP or Donald Trump take back power. “You bet your ass that I will lead the charge,” Navarro said on live television if Republicans take power. “I will take [Congressmen] Adam Schiff and Jamie Raskin, and Nancy Pelosi and [Elaine] Luria and all of those clowns and kangaroos, I’ll take Biden and every single staff member in there –” Confused, MSNBC’s Ari Melber interjected: “And do what?” “We’ll put them with subpoenas, and we’ll start with the impeachment of Biden. For what? Ukraine, the southern border, all manner of things.” Navarro recently admitted the FBI served him with a grand jury subpoena. He has responded by filing a lawsuit, making the draft of that lawsuit public, representing himself, and now appearing once again on MSNBC. Navarro months ago in another MSNBC appearance appeared to describe a coup, according to MSNBC’s Ari Melber. Navarro has been described as a conspiracy theorist but he...
    MTV The "Teen Mom 2" alum might have to settle her lawsuit in court. “Teen Mom 2” alum Chelsea Houska was not able to reach a settlement in the $3 million lawsuit she’s facing from Envy Branding LLC, her former consulting company. Envy accused Houska and her husband — Cole DeBoer — of hiding money they made through social media promotions, though DeBoer and Houska deny the allegations against them. Houska’s legal team had a mediation call with Envy on April 22, but they were unable to reach an agreement. Read More From Heavy How You Can Help Ukraine: Verified Charities, GoFundMe & Ways to Support Ukrainians “As you know, I represent defendants in this matter. I write jointly with Matthew J. McDonald, counsel for plaintiff, to advise that the April 22 private mediation was unsuccessful,” Houska’s attorney, Peter T. Shapiro, wrote to U.S. Magistrate Judge Sarah L. Cave on April 25. “Accordingly, we request that a status conference be scheduled at which a new discovery schedule can be set,” Shapiro continued. “Meanwhile, counsel will endeavor to communicate...
    TEEN Mom alum Chelsea Houska has failed to reach a settlement in her $3million lawsuit with her ex-business partner, as the case will likely head to trial before the star’s upcoming HGTV show.  Chelsea, 30, and her husband Cole, 33, were sued by consulting company Envy for $3million for allegedly withholding money made from social media promotions.  5Chelsea Houska and her husband, Cole DeBoer, were unsuccessful in mediation for their $3million lawsuitCredit: MTV 5The court war comes as the stars film for their upcoming HGTV showCredit: Chelsea Houska/Instagram Chelsea and Cole responded to the lawsuit by filing a counterclaim in May 2020, alleging Envy actually withheld over $150,000 from them.  The Sun can exclusively reveal mediation on April 22 was “unsuccessful.” In court papers obtained by The Sun, Chelsea and Cole’s lawyer informed the judge on the case that no agreement was reached between the parties. The attorney requested a new discovery schedule, which is evidence to be used at trial, as well as to resume all held depositions.  Read more on Chelsea HouskaHOPEFUL Teen Mom Chelsea Houska 'optimistic' she...
    A woman infamously dubbed as 'SoHo Karen' for falsely accusing a black teen of stealing her phone in an upscale Manhattan hotel was a no-show for a hearing that is part of a civil case against her, angering a judge. Miya Ponsetto, 23, made headlines after she attacked 14-year-old Keyon Harrold Jr in the lobby of the boutique Arlo Soho hotel on December 26, 2020, and falsely accused him of stealing her iPhone.   In a video filmed by his father, Keyon Harrold, who is also a prominent jazz musician,  an agitated Ponsetto demands the teenager hand over his phone, claiming he stole it from her .  A hotel manager tries to intervene as Harrold Snr tells the woman to leave his son alone.  Security video later released by the NYPD shows Ponsetto frantically grabbing at the teenager from behind as he tried to escape through the hotel's front door, with both falling to the floor. It was later revealed that Ponsetto's had actually left her phone in an Uber, with the driver returning it to her shortly after, Harrold Sr...
    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A conservation group has filed a lawsuit against U.S. environmental officials for alleged failure to intervene after the Montana Legislature rolled back longstanding water pollution rules. The Bozeman-based Upper Missouri Waterkeeper group said a set of replacement rules proposed by the Montana Department of Environmental Quality will allow more nutrient pollution to enter streams, rivers and other waterways across the state. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has oversight of the state’s pollution rules and is required to approve or reject the changes but has failed to do so, according to the lawsuit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Great Falls. Nutrient pollution comes from farm fertilizer, industrial plants, treated sewage waste, pet waste and numerous other sources. It can be harmful to fish and human health by encouraging the growth of algae blooms that are sometimes toxic. Montana has almost 60,000 miles (97,000 kilometers) of perennial rivers and streams, including major rivers such as the Missouri that drains into North Dakota and the Clark Fork of the Columbia that drains into Idaho. Water...
    A New York judge refused to dismiss the sexual assault lawsuit against Prince Andrew Wednesday. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan ruled that the Duke of York's attorneys failed to challenge the constitutionality of the lawsuit brought against Andrew by his accuser, Virginia Giuffre, according to a report. Giuffre alleges that the prince sexually abused her as a minor after she was trafficked by the late Jeffrey Epstein. MISSOURI BILLS WOULD BAN CRITICAL RACE THEORY AND INCREASE RIGHTS IN EDUCATION She was 17 years old at the time, according to her attorneys. A civil sex case trial will begin between September and December, the report noted. The prince's attorneys attempted to have the case thrown out because they argued Giuffre had lost her ability to sue the Duke of York after signing a $500,000 settlement agreement in 2009 with Epstein. Giuffre had consented to "release, acquit, satisfy, and forever discharge" Epstein and "any other person or entity who could have been included as a potential defendant," according to the agreement. It is...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Lawyers for Los Angeles County have failed to persuade a federal judge to end Vanessa Bryant’s lawsuit over gruesome photos of the helicopter crash that killed her husband, Kobe Bryant, her daughter Gianna and seven others. U.S. District Judge John F. Walter on Wednesday rejected a county motion that would have dismissed the case, saying that “there are genuine issues of material facts for trial,” the Los Angeles Times reported. Vanessa Bryant’s lawsuit claims she and her family suffered emotional distress after a Times investigation found that county sheriff’s deputies took photos of the January 2020 crash scene and shared them. It came to light after a deputy showed cellphone images to patrons in a bar. Sheriff Alex Villanueva quickly ordered deputies to delete the images. Later, it was learned that a county fire captain showed images to off-duty firefighters In seeking the summary judgment to dismiss the case, the county’s attorneys wrote that the photos have never been in the media, on the internet or otherwise publicly disseminated and that the lawsuit is speculative. After...
    Dominion Voting Systems’ $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against Fox News can move forward, a Delaware state judge ruled Thursday. Law & Crime reports Delaware Superior Court Judge Eric M. Davis wrote, “For purposes of the Motion, the Court must view all well-pled facts alleged in the Complaint as true and in a light most favorable to Dominion,” but added clearly, “If the plaintiff offers ‘some direct evidence’ that the statement ‘was probably false,’ the Court can infer that the defendant ‘inten[ded] to avoid the truth.’ The far right wing cable network is being sued for giving “fictions a prominence they otherwise would never have achieved,” Dominion said in its lawsuit back in March, turning “a small flame…into a forest fire.” “With Fox’s global platform,” Dominion’s 138-page lawsuit contents, “an audience of hundreds of millions, and the inevitable and extensive republication and dissemination of the falsehoods through social media, these lies deeply damaged Dominion’s once-thriving business.” READ: The Jan. 6 committee is making impressive progress — but it's also running a big risk In a statement Fox News called the lawsuit...
    Merchandise for the renamed Cleveland Guardians reportedly failed to debut on schedule. The gear was set to be available to retailers at 9 a.m. Monday but was postponed for an unknown reason, according to a report . The new release date has not been announced. The delay comes after the Cleveland Guardians roller derby team filed a lawsuit against the Cleveland Indians to block the name change in October. The Indians announced it would change its name on July 23. SHOPLIFTERS PACK CAR WITH $1,600 IN STOLEN GROCERIES IN BROAD DAYLIGHT “There cannot be two ‘Cleveland Guardians’ teams in Cleveland, and, to be blunt, Plaintiff was here first,” the roller derby team wrote in the lawsuit. Having two teams with the same name in one city would cause confusion and hurt the lesser-known team's ability to market itself, the roller derby team alleged. The roller derby team rejected a four-figure offer from the baseball team to buy the rights to the name, according to Cleveland.com. “We have been and continue to be confident...
                        Tennessee Attorney General Herb Slatery has failed to join several other attorneys general in a lawsuit against Critical Race Theory (CRT). JustTheNews.com reported this week that attorneys general in more than half of the 50 states disagree on how to address alleged racial disparities in school discipline. Both sides filed competing briefs through a U.S. Department of Education proceeding that reportedly attracted 2,700 comments. The website reported that Arizona “led a coalition of 15 states to oppose the reinstatement of the Obama administration’s ‘disparate impact’ guidance, which said statistical differences between the races in school discipline could serve as the basis for a federal civil rights investigation.” Attorneys general in Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas and Utah joined the Arizona attorney general, according to Just The News. The Tennessee Star contacted Slatery’s office for comment Sunday, but staff members did not respond by press time. “Michigan led an opposing coalition of 15 states to argue that the 2014 guidance...
    Starbucks CEO denies reports of shortages in cups and coffee Hidden Obstacles That Keep People From Retirement © Provided by NBC Sports Replay Video SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Skip Ad It’s been a bad week for the NCAA. Via USA Today, a federal judge has refused to dismiss a case in which athletes seek an order preventing the NCAA from limiting name, image, and likeness revenue, and that athletes receive damages based on the share of TV money and social-media revenue athletes would receive absent NIL limits. The effort to receive a piece of the TV revenue may seem confusing at first blush, but the argument goes like this: Individual schools could offer a share of the revenue from television rights as an NIL payment but for NCAA rules preventing it. The ruling doesn’t amount to a victory on the merits of the case; instead, it allows the case to go forward by rejecting the NCAA’s argument that the case should be thrown out. The litigation raises an important point as the world finally wakes up to...
    Subway's tuna sandwiches have been found to contain zero traces of tuna DNA, according to a new lab study.   The research, commissioned by the New York Times, sent more than 60 inches worth of tuna sandwiches to a lab after ordering them from the fast food franchise at various Los Angeles locations.  The sandwiches were ordered without cheese or vegetables to avoid contaminating the test.  The reporter proceeded to remove the tuna meat from the sandwiches before freezing it, then sending it to a commercial food testing lab.  The latest blow to the fast food chain comes just months after a class-action lawsuit was filed against the fast food franchise alleging misrepresentation of the fish in their sandwiches.  A tuna sandwich from Subway is displayed in San Anselmo, California. A recent lab analysis of tuna used in Subway sandwiches commissioned by the New York Times did not reveal any tuna DNA in samples taken from Subway tuna sandwiches The lab involved in the latest tests declined to be named, citing concern about jeopardizing future professional opportunities. The lab conducted...
    FLORENCE, Ariz. (AP) — A Pinal County judge has dismissed a lawsuit that sought to decertify Democratic President-elect Joe Biden’s win in Arizona, marking the failure of the eighth case that challenged the presidential election results in the state. Judge Kevin White concluded on Tuesday that Staci Burk wasn’t a registered voter at the time that she filed her lawsuit and made her legal challenge after the five-day period for contesting election results had passed. The decision came a day after Arizona’s 11 Electoral College members cast their votes for Biden, who won the state over Republican President Donald Trump by more than 10,000 votes. The lawsuit brought by Burk, who isn’t a lawyer but represented herself, is nearly identical to a lawsuit dismissed last week in federal court in Phoenix. Burk’s suit alleged Arizona’s election systems have security flaws that let election workers and foreign countries manipulate results. Opposing attorneys said the lawsuit used conspiracy theories to make allegations against a voting equipment vendor without any proof to back up its claims of widespread election fraud in Arizona. No...
    By Brendan O'Brien (Reuters) - Families of 15 public school students sued California on Monday, claiming the state has failed to provide equal education to poor and minority children during the pandemic. The impoverished students, who range from kindergarten to high school and were only identified by first name in court documents, were not provided devices and internet connections to attend online classes, according to the lawsuit, the first of its kind in the United States. The children attend schools in Oakland and Los Angeles, and many were described as Blacks and Latinos. The lawsuit also claims that schools did not meet academic and mental health support needs, English language barriers and the unmet needs of homeless students. The suit, filed in Alameda County Superior Court, is asking the court to declare that California education officials have violated the state constitution's guarantee of educational equality and order them to fix the alleged inequities. U.S. schools districts including those in California, the most populous state in the nation, closed school buildings and moved classes online in March as the first wave...
    A federal judge said the Trump campaign's latest lawsuit 'strained legal arguments without merit and speculative accusations.' Democrat Joe Biden has been certified as the winner of the presidential election in Pennsylvania, culminating three weeks of vote counting and a string of failed legal challenges by Donald Trump, state officials said Tuesday. The Pennsylvania State Department "certified the results of the November 3 election in Pennsylvania for president and vice president of the United States," Gov. Tom Wolf, a Democrat, tweeted. "As required by federal law, I've signed the Certificate of Ascertainment for the slate of electors for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris," Wolf wrote.
    President Trump's campaign abandoned its attempt to find more votes for the president in Arizona through a lawsuit concerning about 191 ballots that it wanted to be reviewed. The move on Friday comes one day after a six-hour court hearing about the case and after additional ballots tabulated Thursday made it clear that the campaign's request would be inconsequential to final presidential election results in the state. "Since the close of yesterday’s hearing, the tabulation of votes statewide has rendered unnecessary a judicial ruling as to the presidential electors," attorney for the Trump campaign, Kory Langhofer, said in a notice of partial mootness about the lawsuit filed Friday. What started as a lawsuit based on a now-debunked theory that bleed-through from Sharpie markers caused widespread tabulation errors in how ballots were counted in Maricopa County, the most populous county in the state, turned into a narrowly-focused case about a small number of ballots. At issue was whether some in-person Election Day voters' ballots were improperly pushed through a tabulation machine by pressing a "green button" after...
    The Justice Department’s attempt to block a defamation lawsuit against President Donald Trump from E. Jean Carroll—a magazine columnist who has alleged he raped her—has been thrown out by a federal judge. The decision, made public Tuesday morning, ensures the lawsuit can go ahead. If it had gone the other way, and the department had managed to substitute itself as the defendant instead of Trump, it would have abruptly ended the lawsuit as the federal government can’t be sued for defamation. Carroll filed a defamation suit against Trump last year after he denied her allegation that he raped her inside a Manhattan luxury department store dressing room some time in the mid-1990s. Trump continues to deny the allegation. More to follow...
    Raverro Stinnett’s life changed drastically in the spring of 2018. The artist, who was waiting for a ride home on public transportation at Union Station after attending a gala at RedLine gallery, was profiled, beaten and left with permanent brain damage by security guards with Allied Universal Security Services, the firm that contracts with the Regional Transportation District to keep the peace at the station. Stinnett wasn't identified in early coverage of the incident, nor when the guards pleaded guilty in December 2018. But that changed earlier this year when he filed a lawsuit against Allied and RTD. Not long after that, George Floyd’s murder at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer blew the lid off the simmering Black Lives Matter movement. That’s all it took for Stinnett’s story to go nationwide. Yet with the exception of boardmember Shontel Lewis, the RTD board has voted to continue working with Allied. Related Stories Is Union Station, "Denver's Living Room," Really Open to All? Lawsuit Adds Pressure on RTD to Drop Union Station Rule Changes Security Firm Fails to Muzzle...
    NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency has failed to ensure that Pennsylvania and New York are doing enough to reduce pollution that flows from farms and cities into the Chesapeake Bay, according to a lawsuit filed on Thursday. The federal suit was brought by the nonprofit Chesapeake Bay Foundation and others, including the Maryland Watermen’s Association. The lawsuit says the EPA is allowing the two states to miss an upcoming deadline for meeting pollution-reduction goals. “This is the moment in time for the Chesapeake Bay,” William C. Baker, the foundation’s president, said during a conference call with reporters. “This is the time for America to show that it can save a national treasure that is polluted.” Attorneys general from Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia say they’ve filed a similar lawsuit. “Every state in the Chesapeake Bay watershed needs to play a part,” Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh said during the same conference call. “And the EPA, under law, needs to ensure that that happens.” New York and Pennsylvania do not border the nation’s...
    At a meeting tonight, August 11, the board of the Regional Transportation District will consider a resolution to terminate the contract of Allied Universal Security Services by year's end and reallocate $27.3 million that RTD pays the firm in order to invest in what's described as "the expansion of mental, behavioral and social supports." Allied recently faced another challenge in another venue — federal court — and lost badly. The company asked for a gag order against Raverro Stinnett, a Denver artist who recently filed a lawsuit after being brutally beaten at Union Station by three of Allied's security guards in April 2018. Last week, U.S. Magistrate Judge N. Reid Neureiter slapped down this request with extreme prejudice. "Lawsuits, and in particular lawsuits of a constitutional dimension involving interactions between private citizens and government actors, frequently occur in a broader social context," Neuriter said in his opinion. "There is a strong public interest in having a robust debate about such disputed interactions, and a party who claims to have been wronged by unconstitutional or otherwise tortious conduct by a government...
    By KATE BRUMBACK, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Overcrowded cells, a lack of personal protective equipment and limited access to cleaning and sanitation supplies are putting people in a Georgia jail at risk of exposure to the coronavirus outbreak, a federal lawsuit says. Clayton County Sheriff Victor Hill and several of his high-ranking subordinates are ignoring the known risks of the virus, exposing people in their custody to a highly infectious disease that can be fatal, the lawsuit says. Lawyers with the Southern Center for Human Rights and the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia say they filed the lawsuit Wednesday on behalf of four people held in the Clayton County jail. Hill did not respond Thursday to phone messages seeking comment on the lawsuit. The lawsuit accuses the jail administrators of failing to take reasonable steps to ensure effective social distancing and failing to provide sufficient sanitation or adequate protective equipment. They also haven't adequately identified and responded to positive cases or provided inmates with information on how to avoid infection, it says. The conditions violate the inmates' constitutional...
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