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    ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A senior U.S. diplomat apologized Friday to thousands of Afghans stranded in the United Arab Emirates months after the fall of Kabul to the Taliban, promising to speed repatriation for some to America while acknowledging that authorities still do not know who some of them are. The visit comes as America still struggles with how to handle the tens of thousands who piled into planes in the hectic final days of Afghanistan’s U.S.-backed government, capping the end of a 20-year experiment in replacing hard-line Taliban rule with a nascent democracy. While vowing to do all they could, the diplomats who spoke to journalists afterward acknowledged still not being able to answer what would happen to some — and that the journalists, prosecutors and others who made up civil society in Afghanistan might never get U.S. visas. Meanwhile, Emirati officials still must deal with thousands of angry Afghans who already have held protests over the uncertainty. “I told them that I was really sorry it was taking so long and I was as...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Taliban have detained two foreign journalists on assignment with the U.N. refugee agency and a number of its Afghan staff working in the country’s capital, UNHCR said Friday. The development in Kabul comes as President Joe Biden was expected to issue an executive order that would allow U.S. financial institutions to facilitate access to $3.5 billion of assets for Afghan aid. “Two journalists on assignment with UNHCR and Afghan nationals working with them have been detained in Kabul,” the refugee agency tweeted. “We are doing our utmost to resolve the situation, in coordination with others.” The Geneva-based organization refused to comment further. The Taliban so far have not replied to queries for information about the detained. One of the detained is Andrew North, a former British Broadcasting Corporation journalist who has worked extensively in Afghanistan. His wife, Natalia Antelava issued a plea on Twitter for his release. “Andrew was in Kabul working for the UNHCR @Refugees trying to help the people of Afghanistan,” Antelava said. “We are extremely concerned for his safety...
    Two journalists working with the United Nations have been detained in Kabul, the agency says. The U.N.'s High Commissioner for Refugees confirmed Friday that two journalists and Afghan nationals working alongside them are being held. "We are doing our utmost to resolve the situation, in coordination with others. We will make no further comment given the nature of the situation," the agency wrote in a Friday morning tweet. BIDEN OFFICIALS FALL BEHIND BLUE STATES ON MASKS Two journalists on assignment with UNHCR and Afghan nationals working with them have been detained in Kabul. We are doing our utmost to resolve the situation, in coordination with others.We will make no further comment given the nature of the situation.— UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency (@Refugees) February 11, 2022 The National Directorate of Security, the Taliban's security and intelligence agency, told Reuters it was in touch with the interior ministry but had no further information about the missing journalists. "We have no information about them, when and where they have disappeared, we haven't reached any information yet;...
    A nine-month-old baby girl who was evacuated from Afghanistan died on Wednesday after arriving at Philadelphia airport aboard a military plane, in the first death of an evacuee on US soil.  The baby was on a C-17 flying from Germany's Ramstein Air Base to Philadelphia International Airport with her father when she suffered a 'medical emergency', officials said.  EMTs and an interpreter were on the scene when the aircraft landed at 9:16 pm, and sent the girl and her father to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.  The baby was pronounced dead at 10:10 pm, according to Officer Tanya Little of the Philadelphia Police Department.  Chris Mitchell, a spokesman for the Department of Defense told Business Insider that while in flight, 'the crew was notified that an infant was unresponsive' and 'requested medical assistance and priority air traffic control arrival routing.'   A spokeswoman for the Philadelphia Police Department said that officers responded to a call of the infant's sudden death and were met at the hospital by agents from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, who informed them that the young girl had 'suffered...
    The Afghan news network Pajhwok reported on Thursday that Afghanistan has lost 27 media outlets – including both television and print/online media – since the Taliban took over the country on August 15. The publications and broadcasters identified may be among hundreds of journalistic organizations in the country that will not survive the terrorist group’s installation as the de facto government of Afghanistan. Reporters Without Borders, an international advocacy network for free journalism, found evidence that over 100 media outlets in the country stopped operating indefinitely in the first two days of the Taliban regime. During the Taliban’s first tenure running the country between 1996 and 2001, the jihadist organization implemented an extremist interpretation of sharia, the Islamic law, that prevented women from showing any part of their bodies – including their eyes – in public, banned girls from school, and punished any deviation from Quranic beliefs with extreme violence and death. Its tyrannical rule resulted in a near-complete limitation of freedom of expression and freedom of the press outside of jihadist propaganda. This time, Taliban terrorists through official spokesmen have...
    More than 120 Afghans who worked for The New York Times, including reporters, arrived in the United States on Tuesday from Mexico City, where officials took the evacuees after fleeing Afghanistan, the newspaper reported. The 124 Afghans were evacuated on Aug. 19 to Qatar before ultimately heading to Mexico until resettlement services could be coordinated in the United States, according to The Times. The group include reporters, over 60 children, interpreters and others. Mexico has offered to assist other news organizations such as The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post to safely evacuate their own journalists. Only one Afghan, a full-time stringer for The Times named Farooq Jan Mangal, has not yet received clearance to leave George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston on Thursday, although the remaining 123 people have. “We hope border officials quickly resolve whatever issues have delayed the processing of one remaining Times journalist, Farooq Jan Mangal, who for more than a decade has reported bravely to help keep the world informed about Afghanistan,” The Times’ publisher, A.G. Sulzberger, said in a statement. A Catholic nonprofit will...
    U.S.-friendly journalists are still in Afghanistan, left behind following the recent exodus of U.S. troops, support teams and other personnel. The journalists left behind have worked under the umbrella of the U.S. Agency for Global Media — USAGM — an independent federal agency that oversees such global media entities as the Voice of America and Radio Free Europe. Rep. Michael McCaul, Texas Republican, is appalled by this phenomenon. “It is absolutely disgraceful that the U.S. State Department claimed they evacuated their local employees when in reality they abandoned hundreds of USAGM journalists and their families,” Mr. McCaul said in a statement. TOP STORIES Taliban helicopter video debunked by fact-checkers; Ted Cruz walks back inaccurate tweet Utah voters ready for Romney replacement, poll shows Marine Corps chief backs study of troubled final days of Afghan fight He estimated that some 500 of those journalists plus their families remain in Afghanistan and that many were assured they’d be evacuated by the Biden administration. Other sources have placed the number of stranded journalists at around 100. “We are incredibly disappointed that our...
    Michal Cizek/Getty Images U.S. government-backed journalists are stranded in Afghanistan, according to multiple media reports. More than 100 employees with the U.S. Agency for Global Media (USAGM) – which includes outlets such as Voice of America and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) – were promised by the State Department that they would be evacuated only to be left behind as the U.S. military left Afghanistan on Monday after almost 20 years of war there. RFE/RL journalists made several trips to the airport in the Afghan capital of Kabul, where the evacuations were taking place, only to not make it inside. “You would have expected that the United States government, which helped create the space for journalism and civil society in Afghanistan over the last 20 years, would have tried to do more over the last several weeks to assist journalists who made a decision that it was best for them to leave the country,” RFE/RL president Jamie Fly told The Washington Post. “But they consistently failed to do that.” Fly told the outlet that shortly before the Aug. 31 withdrawal...
    The Taliban is firmly in control of Afghanistan following the U.S. military's departure, and experts don’t think there will be a free press under the new regime because the group prefers propaganda and barbaric treatment of women over the pillars of democracy.  "Basic freedoms are not tolerated, freedom of the press being one of them," Fox News contributor Daniel Hoffman said. "It's a terrorist state. They're going to shut down all sorts of freedoms. That's the legacy that we've left behind." Hoffman, who served as director of the CIA Middle East and North Africa Division, said the Taliban simply doesn’t care for America or what it stands for, and the group shouldn’t be expected to realistically comply. TALIBAN CLAIMS IT'LL BE MORE MODERATE, BUT KILLINGS CONTINUE IN AFGHANISTAN "I don't think there's any expectation that these guys are going to respect women's rights or freedom of the press or any other stuff that, look, they just fought a 20-year war against us. They don't like us," Hoffman said.  "What they don't like about us is freedom, liberty and democracy, those things. Two...
    Voice of America (VOA) and Radio Azadi journalists are still trapped in Afghanistan as the August 31 withdrawal of U.S. troops from the country draws closer.       “Many Afghan journalists remain unable to get into the airport — including most of the staff of the U.S.-government operated Voice of America and Radio Azadi,” the New York Times reported on Wednesday, quoting an unnamed U.S. official. The Times previously reported on August 15 that more than 100 journalists who work for U.S. state-funded broadcasters, including VOA and Radio Azadi, were stuck in Afghanistan.  VOA reported on Tuesday that Taliban fighters have been searching the homes of some media workers, though the publication did not specify if their own journalists are included. VOA’s Bureau Chief for Afghanistan & Pakistan, Ayesha Tanzeem, has been documenting her treacherous journey at the Kabul airport on Twitter. Evacuation flights continue out of #KabulAiport taking foreigners and to this point (Wed, Aug 25), Afghans out of #Afghanistan. pic.twitter.com/3zB1xtOr52 — Ayesha Tanzeem (@atanzeem) August 25, 2021 During an August 17 interview on National Public Radio (NPR), Tanzeem said she was...
    New York (CNN Business)A version of this article first appeared in the "Reliable Sources" newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.Western news organizations are starting to head out of Afghanistan. Spokespeople for The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, CBS News, and NBC News all told me on Thursday evening that their reporters have exited the country as the security situation intensifies with the Taliban takeover of Kabul.The Journal said it no longer has "reporters on the ground in Afghanistan" but remains "committed" to its coverage. The Post said it is relying on "stringers on the ground" and has journalists assisting in nearby countries with "wide past experience in Afghanistan." CBS said its correspondent, Roxana Saberi, had flown out to Doha where she continues to cover the situation. And NBC said Richard Engel and the rest of the network's team are now out of the country.News outlets are making real-time decisions, weighing a variety of factors as they decide whether to keep their personnel in the country or pull them out. Some outlets, such as The Los Angeles...
    National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan raised eyebrows on Tuesday by saying he wouldn’t "comment on hypotheticals" about what U.S. troops would do if all Americans and allies aren't evacuated from Afghanistan by President Biden's August 31 deadline.  "If the mission is not complete by Aug. 31 and there are American and Afghan allies who remain there, will U.S. troops stay until everyone is out? Or will they leave?" CBS News reporter Weijia Jiang asked during a White House press briefing.  EX-OBAMA ADVISER CALLS ON BIDEN TO ‘SHAKE UP’ NATIONAL SECURITY TEAM AFTER ‘DISASTER’ IN AFGHANISTAN "So, I’m not going to comment on hypotheticals," Sullivan responded. "I’m going to stay focused on the task at hand, which is getting as many people out as rapidly as possible, and we will take that day-by-day." Jiang shot back, "So you can't commit to bringing back every American?" "Others tried to pin this down, but Sullivan would not commit to having U.S. troops in Afghanistan past 08/31, even if some Americans and Afghan allies are still trying to leave," Jiang tweeted after the briefing....
    NEW YORK (AP) — The swift Taliban takeover of Afghanistan has news organizations simultaneously trying to cover the story, protect their journalists and families and help people who have done work for them over the past two decades. Video of chaotic scenes from the Kabul airport were frequently repeated during news reports of the fast-developing story Monday, which President Joe Biden addressed in a speech to the nation. CNN reporter Clarissa Ward, in an interview from Afghanistan, said even some Taliban fighters she had spoken to were surprised at the speed with which the country fell. “I don’t think they ever doubted they would win,” she told The Associated Press. “But I don’t think they anticipated it would happen this quickly.” Ward’s own reporting from Kabul streets illustrated uncertainties about the country’s future. At one point, she noted that the Taliban had given her permission for CNN to film a report, but she was asked to stand to the side “because I’m a woman.” She adjusted her attire to reflect the takeover by the more culturally conservative forces, wearing a...
    Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images. Washington Post publisher Fred Ryan emailed National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan on Monday, calling for the Biden administration to get journalists and their families out of Afghanistan, reported NBC News. The subject of the email was “Urgent re safety of US Journalists,” according to the outlet. “Jake, Urgent request on behalf of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post is to have our 204 journalists, support staff and families transported by US Military from the civilian side of the Kabul airport to the military side of the airport where they can be safe as they await evacuation flights,” wrote Ryan, according to NBC News. Ryan wrote that the journalists are “currently in danger” and “need the US government to get them to safety,” according to NBC News. “Please advise as to how best to proceed,” he said, according to the outlet. The email comes as the Taliban has taken over most of Afghanistan, including the capital city of Kabul, causing Afghans to flee to the airport to get onto planes to get...
    The publisher of the Washington Post is urging the White House to oversee the safe removal of more than 200 hundred journalists, support staff and their families from Afghanistan as the country has fallen under Taliban control.  "Urgent request on behalf of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post is to have our 204 journalists, support staff and families transported by US Military from the civilian side of the Kabul airport to the military side of the airport where they can be safe as they await evacuation flights," Fred Ryan wrote to national security adviser Jake Sullivan on Monday in an e-mail obtained by The Hill. "They are currently in danger and need the US government to get them to safety. Please advise as to how best to proceed."  Ryan's letter comes amid the chaos that has erupted in the war-torn nation following the Taliban's takeover Sunday of the capital city of Kabul, where thousands have descended upon the local airport looking to flee the country. President BidenJoe BidenInternational community calls for 'safe and orderly departure' of foreign nationals and Afghans Taliban seize...
    Washington Post publisher Fred Ryan urged the Biden administration Monday to help safely evacuate American journalists and their families from Afghanistan.  The Post’s publisher directly emailed U.S. National Security advisor Jake Sullivan as the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan, asking him to make sure reporters from The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post can safely exit.  "Jake, Urgent request on behalf of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post is to have our 204 journalists, support staff and families transported by US Military from the civilian side of the Kabul airport to the military side of the airport where they can be safe as they await evacuation flights," Ryan wrote in an email obtained by Fox News.  MAINSTREAM MEDIA CRUSHES BIDEN FOR ‘FLAT-FOOTED,’ ‘HUMILIATING’ BETRAYAL OF AFGHANS AS TALIBAN TAKES CONTROL Washington Post publisher Fred Ryan urged the Biden administration to help safely evacuate American journalists and their families from Afghanistan. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)  (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) "They are currently in danger and need the US government to get...
    In this article NYTMen try to get inside Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan August 16, 2021.Stringer | ReutersThe publisher of The Washington Post pleaded with the White House on Monday to have the U.S. military move to safety more than 200 journalists and related people affiliated with the Post, Wall Street Journal and New York Times who are "in danger" at the Kabul airport in Afghanistan. Post Publisher Fred Ryan asked National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan in an "urgent request" email to have them moved from the civilian side of Hamid Karzai International Airport "to the military side where they can be safe as they await evacuation flights." "They are currently in danger and need the US government to get them to safety," Ryan wrote in the email, which he said he was writing on behalf of the three newspapers. Ryan wrote that there are 204 journalists, support staff and family members from the three newspapers who are stuck on the civilian side of the airport.CNBC PoliticsRead more of CNBC's politics coverage: U.S. troops arrive in Afghanistan...
    The body of a murdered Reuters photographer was badly mutilated by the Taliban before it was sent home to India, it has emerged. Danish Siddiqui, 38, was buried in Delhi, India, two days after he was killed covering fighting between Afghan security forces and the Taliban near a border crossing with Pakistan earlier this month. The Pulitzer prize-winning Indian photographer was embedded with Afghan special forces in the former Taliban bastion of Kandahar when he died. He arrived in New Delhi on a flight from Afghanistan on July 18 and his coffin was taken to his home where hundreds of friends and news media colleagues had gathered outside. The photographer's brutal killing has further stoked fears the Taliban will re-assert its barbaric rule over the country after the withdrawal of the United States' presence, which sparked a brutal offensive from the militia group across the country. The body of a murdered Reuters photographer Danish Siddiqui, 38, was badly mutilated by the Taliban before it was sent home to New Delhi, India, it has emerged. Pictured: Mourner's carry Mr Siddiqui's coffin...
    ISLAMABAD - The day the Taliban entered Balkh district, 20 km west of Mazar e Sharif, the capital of Balkh province last month, local radio station Nawbahar shuttered its doors and most of its journalists went into hiding. Within days the station started broadcasting again, but the programming was different. Rather than the regular line-up, Nawbahar was playing Islamist anthems and shows produced by the Taliban. The switch in programming is a far cry from how Nawbahar usually operates. The station started up in the northern province in 2004—broadcasting news and entertainment in Dari and Pashto languages thanks to funds from the U.S. Agency for International Development. Its experience reflects a growing trend for Afghanistan’s independent media. As the security situation deteriorates, so does the situation for all the other gains the country made in the last 20 years, including press freedom. Can Afghanistan’s Free Press Survive? The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism says Afghanistan went from zero independent media under Taliban rule to 170 radio stations, more than 100 newspapers, and multiple TV stations since the...
    KABUL (Reuters) - Gunmen ambushed a bus carrying university staff in northeastern Afghanistan on Tuesday killing the driver and a student, officials said, as attacks on civilians continued, while peace talks between the government and the Taliban remained stalled. Six university lecturers were also wounded during the attack in Baghlan province, said Sayed Hamid Rushan, a spokesman for the interior ministry said. The ministry blamed the Taliban for the attack, but the militant group denied involvement. "The attack...has nothing to do with our mujahideen (fighters), we condemn the attack and consider it as a conspiracy of the enemy," said Zabihullah Mujahid, a Taliban spokesman. On the other side of the country, unidentified gunmen attacked security forces guarding a dam in Herat, killing three, wounding one, according to officials in the western province. Four other members of the security forces were missing. Diplomats and advocates have become alarmed at the rising violence, including targeted attacks on government employees, journalists, academics and rights workers in recent months even as peace negotiations were being held in Qatar. Human Rights Watch (HRW) issued a...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — An angry mob ransacked a local radio station in northern Afghanistan last week after a mosque imam incited the attackers, claiming loud music played by the station had interfered with his prayer service, an international journalists group said Tuesday. The International Federation of Journalists condemned the attack last Friday in the city of Kunduz, the capital of Kunduz province. It quoted Mohsen Ahmad, director of the Zohra Radio that was targeted in the attack, as saying the mob had damaged station equipment and forced it to halt transmission for several hours. No one was hurt in the attack. “The safety situation for journalists in Afghanistan must be a major priority for the Afghanistan government,” urged the Brusseles-based IFJ. The Afghan Independent Journalists’ Association said the same mob tried to also attack two other nearby radio stations but were prevented from entering by policemen who arrived at the scene. Afghanistan has seen a wave of attacks in recent months against journalists, human rights activists and civil society members. The international press freedom...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — An Afghan journalist and human rights activist was shot and killed on Friday by unidentified gunmen in western Afghanistan, the fifth journalist to be killed in the war-ravaged country in the past two months, a provincial spokesman said. Bismillah Adil Aimaq was on the road near Feroz Koh, the provincial capital of Ghor, returning home to the city after visiting his family in a village nearby, when gunmen opened fire at the vehicle. According to the provincial governor’s spokesman, Arif Abir, others in the car, including Aimaq’s brother, were unharmed. Aimaq worked as the head of the local Radio Sada-e-Ghor station and was also a human rights activist in the province. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the shooting. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid insisted the insurgents were in no way connected with the shooting. Aimaq was the fifth journalists slain in attacks in the past two months. Last week, Rahmatullah Nekzad, who headed the journalists’ union in eastern Ghazni province, was killed in an attack by armed men outside his home. Nekzad was...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A prominent local journalist was shot dead by unknown assailants in Afghanistan's central Ghazni province on Monday — the fourth to be killed in the war-ravaged nation in just two months. Afghanistan is considered one of the world's most dangerous countries for journalists. Rahmatullah Nekzad was gunned down as he left his home in Ghazni City to walk to a nearby mosque, said Ahmad Khan Serat, spokesman for the provincial police chief. Nekzad, who headed the Ghazni Journalists' Union, was well known in the area. He had contributed to The Associated Press since 2007 and had previously worked for the Al Jazeera satellite TV channel. The Committee to Protect Journalists condemned the killing and the relentless attacks on journalists in Afghanistan. "Rahmatullah Nikzad’s crucial work documenting the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan has been brought to a tragic end by this brutal killing,” said Aliya Iftikhar, Committee to Protect Journalists' senior Asia researcher. “The recent spate of killings of journalists in Afghanistan is unacceptable and the Afghan government must redouble efforts to ensure justice and safety for...
    KABUL (Reuters) - An Afghan journalist was shot dead by unknown assailants in Afghanistan's central Ghazni province on Monday, the fourth to be killed in the war-torn nation in last two months. Rahmatullah Nekzad was gunned down as he left his home in Ghazni city and was headed towards a mosque, said local police officials and an interior ministry official. Large parts of Ghazni province are under Taliban control. The hardline Islamist group denied involvement in the killing. "We consider this killing a loss for the country," said Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid. Islamic State militants, blamed for a series of attacks on a range of targets in Afghanistan in recent months, claimed responsibility for attack on a local journalist earlier this month. Last month two journalists were killed in separate bombings. The international press freedom group, Reporters Without Borders, has called Afghanistan one of the world's deadliest countries for journalists. (Reporting by Abdul Qadir Sediqi Orooj Hakimi, Writing by Rupam Jain; Editing by Dan Grebler) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: India, Afghanistan
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A prominent local journalist was shot dead by unknown assailants in Afghanistan’s central Ghazni province on Monday — the fourth to be killed in the war-ravaged nation in just two months. Afghanistan is considered one of the world’s most dangerous countries for journalists. Rahmatullah Nekzad was gunned down as he left his home in Ghazni City to walk to a nearby mosque, said Ahmad Khan Serat, spokesman for the provincial police chief. Nekzad, who headed the Ghazni Journalists’ Union, was well known in the area. He had contributed to The Associated Press since 2007 and had previously worked for the Al Jazeera satellite TV channel. During his career, Nekzad was arrested at various times by the United States, the Afghan government and Taliban insurgents. His peers said he prided himself in telling all sides of a story. The Taliban denied involvement in the killing, calling it a cowardly attack. “We consider this killing a loss for the country,” said Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid. Large swaths of Ghazni province are under Taliban control. Islamic State militants,...
    (CNN)Gunmen shot and killed a female television journalist, who was also a women's rights activist, in Afghanistan on Thursday, an incident that underscores an increasing trend of violence against journalists in the country.Malalai Maiwand, a reporter at Enikas Radio and TV in Nangarhar, was killed along with her driver in an attack on their vehicle in Jalalabad, capital of the eastern province of Nangarhar, taking the total number of journalists and media workers killed this year in Afghanistan to 10."She was on the way to office when the incident happened," Attaullah Khogyani, spokesman for the provincial governor, said.The area has been a hotbed of militant activity, most notably involving Islamic State, but no group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack.Afghan interior ministry spokesman Tariq Arian said that in the last decade and a half, the vast majority of journalists killed have been victims of the Taliban.Read MoreTaliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid denied the group's involvement in the incident.Enikas has been targeted before, with its owner, Engineer Zalmay, kidnapped for ransom in 2018.Maiwand is also not the first of her family to...
    JALALABAD/KABUL (Reuters) - Gunmen shot and killed a female television journalist, who was also a women's rights activist, in Afghanistan on Thursday, an incident that underscores an increasing trend of violence against journalists in the country. Malalai Maiwand, a reporter at Enikas Radio and TV in Nangarhar, was killed along with her driver in an attack on their vehicle in Jalalabad, capital of the eastern province of Nangarhar, taking the total number of journalists and media workers killed this year in Afghanistan to 10. "She was on the way to office when the incident happened," Attaullah Khogyani, spokesman for the provincial governor, said. The area has been a hotbed of militant activity, most notably involving Islamic State, but no group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack. Afghan interior ministry spokesman Tariq Arian said that in the last decade and a half, the vast majority of journalists killed have been victims of the Taliban. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid denied the group's involvement in the incident. Enikas has been targeted before, with its owner, Engineer Zalmay, kidnapped for ransom in 2018. Maiwand is also...
    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Gunmen shot and killed a female TV anchor in eastern Afghanistan early Thursday, officials said. The attackers opened fire on Malala Maiwand’s car soon after she left her house in the eastern Nangarhar province, said Attaullah Khogyani, a spokesman for the governor. No one has claimed responsibility, but an Islamic State affiliate is headquartered in eastern Afghanistan and has claimed most of the recent attacks on civilians in Afghanistan. The Taliban also operate in the area. In addition to working as a TV and radio presenter, Maiwand was also an activist who advocated for the rights of Afghan women and children. Two Afghan journalists were killed in separate bombings in Afghanistan last month. The international press freedom group Reporters Without Borders has called Afghanistan one of the world’s deadliest countries for journalists. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    By LARRY NEUMEISTER, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — An Afghan man has been brought to the United States to face charges in the 2008 gunpoint kidnapping of a journalist for The New York Times, an Afghan journalist and a driver in Afghanistan, federal authorities announced Wednesday. The charges against Haji Najibullah, 42, were in a six-count indictment unsealed in Manhattan federal court. He briefly appeared at a hearing conducted electronically because of the coronavirus, where a U.S. magistrate judge ordered him detained after his court-appointed lawyer, Mark Gombiner, declined to seek bail. Gombiner did not respond to a message seeking comment. A prosecutor said Najibullah was brought from Ukraine to the United States on Tuesday to face charges including hostage taking, conspiracy and kidnapping. Authorities did not say where or when he was first arrested, but in a release they thanked Ukrainian authorities for help in his arrest and transfer. If convicted, he could face life in prison. The kidnapping victims were not identified by authorities, but the description matched the kidnapping of the journalist, David Rohde, who worked...
    NEW YORK – An Afghan man has been brought to the United States to face charges in the 2008 gunpoint kidnapping of a journalist for The New York Times, an Afghan journalist and a driver in Afghanistan, federal authorities announced Wednesday. The charges against Haji Najibullah, 42, were in a six-count indictment unsealed in Manhattan federal court. He was to make an initial court appearance. A message seeking comment was sent to the assistant federal defender who was representing him. In a release, federal authorities said Najibullah had been brought from Ukraine to face charges including hostage taking, conspiracy and kidnapping. Authorities did not say where or when he was arrested, but they thanked Ukrainian authorities for help in his arrest and transfer. If convicted, he could face life in prison. The kidnapping victims were not identified by authorities, but the description matched the kidnapping of the journalist, David Rohde, who worked for the Times, and an Afghan journalist, Tahir Ludin, as they were heading to interview a Taliban leader. Both made a dramatic escape from a Taliban-controlled compound in...
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