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    The data behind the most influential theory of what causes Alzheimer's disease may have been 'manipulated', a damning scientific probe has claimed. Experts fear the allegedly falsified results have misled research over the last 16 years, potentially wasting billions of pounds of funding. A six-month investigation by Science, considered one of the world's most respected research journals, uncovered 'shockingly blatant' tampering of results in the seminal 2006 University of Minnesota study. The paper pointed to a particular protein — known as amyloid beta — as the driving force behind Alzheimer's. It was the first substance in brain tissue ever identified that seemed to be behind the condition's memory-robbing effects. Published in rival journal Nature, the study became one of the most cited articles on Alzheimer's ever published. Around £1.3billion ($1.6billion) of funding for studies mentioning amyloids was spent by the US Government over the last year alone. It made up half of the country's total Alzheimer's research funding. But images from the study, which involved injecting mice with the protein, appear to be doctored to 'better fit a hypothesis', according to Dr...
    The House Energy and Commerce Committee overwhelmingly approved a bill to establish an independent high-risk, high-reward biomedical research division, the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health, to pursue medical breakthroughs. In a rare show of bipartisanship, the committee voted 53-3 to advance the ARPA-H Act to the full House floor for a vote. The agency is a biomedical research version of the military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, famed for its role in developing the internet and GPS. The “no” votes came from three Republican members: Billy Long of Missouri, Debbie Lesko of Arizona, and John Curtis of Utah. FDA AUTHORIZES PFIZER-BIONTECH COVID-19 BOOSTERS FOR CHILDREN 5-11 The bill, first introduced in October 2021 by Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-CA), would establish the standalone ARPA-H within the Department of Health and Human Services as outlined in President Joe Biden’s 2022 budget proposal. In addition to the $1 billion allocated to the agency in the 2022 Appropriations Act, the bill would also authorize a fund to be replenished for the next five years with cash infusions of...
    Some experts are hopeful they have made a groundbreaking discovery in the race for an HIV cure using technology from the emerging world of gene editing. Researchers at Northwestern University used CRISPR, a gene editing technology that is growing in both use and in opposition, to identify parts of the virus that are key to its ability to infect human blood cells and replicate. While it is still a long way away, the researchers are hopeful that their discovery will open the door for further investigation that will eventually lead to the development of a cure, or vaccine, for the virus. More than one million Americans are infected with HIV, according to stats from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and while the infection can be managed with therapeutics, there is still no cure. A team at Northwestern University used CRISPR gene editing technology to identify over 80 genes that are involved in the process of HIV infecting cells and replicating in the person's body (file photo) Dr Judd Hulquist led the research, which was published earlier this...
    WHEN dad Andrew Smith started to need a different size shoes at the age of 52, his daughters became concerned. The father-of-four went from a size 11 shoe to a size 15 in the space of around three months. 3The Smith family are pictured above, from left to right, Sharon, Scott, Joyce, Andrew and SarahCredit: Brain Tumour Research 3Sarah said her dad Andrew became short tempered and had a sudden growth spurtCredit: Brain Tumour Research After an excessive six-month growth spurt and a change in personality, Andrew now 60, was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2014. His youngest daughter, Sarah Smith, said: “Dad would get very short-tempered and would go from zero to 10 within seconds. "It was like he was a completely different person at times and, because it was on the growth part of his brain, his whole body grew." Andrew was diagnosed with a pituitary tumour which forms in or on the pituitary gland. This is a small structure that is attached to the base of the brain behind the nose. Experts at Brain Tumour Research...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Over 150 friends and family of Boston resident Cathy Nally jumped into the frigid water at DCR Carson Beach in South Boston on Saturday to raise money for ALS research. Nally was diagnosed with ALS in October of 2020. The first annual “Rally 4 Nally Polar Plunge” was created to raise awareness and support for Cathy’s fight against it. “Just seeing the turnout, it is incredible to see how many people support my mother and my family,” said Betsy Nally, Cathy’s daughter. “She is our rock and we’d do anything for her, so seeing everyone out here today despite the cold has been really heartwarming.” Betsy said the plunge was a tribute to Pete Frates, the former Boston College baseball player whose battle with ALS inspired the Ice Bucket Challenge. Betsy and her brother Danny have already raised over $150,000 to support their mom and help others who are fighting the disease. “We were trying to think of some way to really raise awareness for ALS and support our mom in her battle against it. And her...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — A Bay Area nonprofit dedicated to advancing research on an incurable — and fatal — disease of the nervous system is looking for 300 more people by the end of this month to participate in the largest-ever research project on the illness. EverythingALS already has recruited nearly 700 people this year in a national speech study that aims to collect quantifiable data on some of the early symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, otherwise known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease. READ MORE: Violent Night In Oakland -- Homicide, Gunfire At Sideshow, Pot Dispensary ShootoutGehrig was a New York Yankees player who was diagnosed with the rare degenerative condition at 36 and died in 1941 just before his 38th birthday. An estimated 30,000 Americans are living with ALS, which causes widespread loss of muscle control as nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are destroyed. Early symptoms range from twitching, cramps and weakness to difficulty chewing and slurred speech. Patients typically do not live more than five years after signs of the disease first appear....
              moreby Kirk Allen and John Kraft   Few would argue the United States, or any country for that matter, was prepared for the COVID-19 pandemic, even though, starting in 2003, the U.S. devoted $5.6 billion to fund Project Bioshield, running through 2013, and another $2.8 billion of funding through 2018. Project Bioshield was designed to prepare the United States against a bio attack, including provisions for the stockpiling and distribution of vaccines. Though Covid-19 was a new virus, congressional testimony from 2003 paints a concerning picture about what we knew – and when – about the family of viruses from which it originated. “I am particularly interested in learning how Project BioShield would assist in addressing the current public health emergency created by the epidemic known as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome [SARS],” said Tom Davis, chairman of the Committee on Government Reform. “More than 2,000 suspected cases of this mysterious disease have been reported in 17 nations, including the United States, with 78 fatalities. So far, there is no effective treatment or vaccine to combat this deadly syndrome.” Among those testifying to...
    RADNOR, Pa. (CBS) — It’s a Mainline tradition. On Sunday, hundreds ran in the Radnor Run. Participants are helping to make a positive impact in the lives of those affected by lung disease. READ MORE: Khadeir Harris Arrested, Charged In Connection To Strawberry Mansion Hit-And-Run That Left Ja-Kha House Dead, Police Say“It feels great,” Caroline Hutchinson, Executive Director of the American Lung Association, said. “Feels good to be here and to do an in-person event safely.” About 400 runners took part in the run. “It’s the American Lung Association, a good cause, and I feel great,” Lee Covich, who participated in the run, said. “We’ve taken home the trophy the last three years,” Steve McMenamin, of Team DLL, said. McMenamin, who’s from South Carolina flew in on this Halloween to lead his team of 54 runners to another victory. He says the real victory is maintaining mental and physical health. READ MORE: Travelers Left Feeling Frustrated At Philadelphia International Airport As American Airlines Cancels Thousands Of Flights“We are encouraging our members to invest in themselves,” he said. “This is...
    New findings from a Queensland medical research centre has found existing medications can be used to treat Alzheimer's. Alzheimer's is a neurodegenerative disease that is estimated to affect 400,000 Australians, with the disease more prevalent in older demographics. Tuesday 21 September is world Alzheimer's day, bringing recognition to the roughly 55 million people worldwide living with the condition, which is a form of dementia. Research by Dr Eske Derks and Dr Zac Gerring from QIMR Berghofer found a priority list of medications used targeted the activity of genes linked to the condition can be repurposed to alleviate symptoms. Alzheimer's is a neurodegenerative disease that is estimated to affect 400,000 Australians, with the disease more prevalent in older demographics 'So what we found is that these drugs target genetic risk factors of Alzheimer's disease. So that implies that maybe they will be effective,' Dr Derks told AAP. 'The drugs we've identified are safe and have been approved to treat other conditions. If we can repurpose them to alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, we can get new drugs to patients faster.'...
    High cholesterol in middle-age is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer's more than a decade later, research suggests. The study looked at 1.8million adults aged over 40 with a follow-up period up to 23 years or until dementia diagnosis. Of 953,635 people who had increased levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 2.3 per cent, or 21,602, went on to be diagnosed with the disease. The study looked at 1.8million adults aged over 40 with a follow-up period up to 23 years or until dementia diagnosis (file photo) Of 953,635 people who had increased levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 2.3 per cent, or 21,602, went on to be diagnosed with the disease (file photo) RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Charities push for PM to honour social care commitment, two... Cholesterol in middle aged `linked to Alzheimer´s more than... Share this article Share While elevated levels of total cholesterol were also associated with an increased risk, this link was weaker suggesting it is largely driven by LDL. Study lead...
    The PAN legislator, Alejandra Reynoso, accompanied by Socorro Negrete, president of the Mexican Association for the Care of Rare Diseases, led the ceremony to illuminate the Senate facilities with colors alluding to these diseases. Within the framework of the National Day for Rare Diseases, which is commemorated on February 29 of each year, the Health Commission held a national forum to analyze the state of the investigation of this type of disease in the country. César Alberto Cruz Santiago, a member of the General Health Council, announced that this body will carry out a nationwide census to establish a registry of this type of illness. He explained that this database is intended to be, in turn, a management and control system for treatments and decision-making in matters of rare diseases. Cruz Santiago said that these conditions are a complex problem that requires immediate and joint solutions to give a greater possibility of a solution. He indicated that one of the problems that have to be solved is the one referring to the acquisition of drugs for rare...
    SAN DIEGO (CNS) -- San Diego Zoo Safari Park visitors can once again see the eight gorillas who live there, now that they have fully recovered from COVID-19, officials said.Visits to the exhibit were restricted for more than a month after three of the Safari Park's gorillas tested positive in January for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID. The exhibit has fully reopened, the zoo announced Saturday."We're so grateful for the outpouring concern and support we've received while the troop safely recovered,'' said Lisa Peterson, executive director of the park, 10News reported Monday. "We're thrilled to share the joy that this beloved troop brings to our community and to our guests.''Officials believe the apes contracted the virus from a zoo worker who carried it but was asymptomatic. It is believed to be the first case of transmission of the disease from a human to an ape.Zoologists at San Diego Zoo Global treated the gorillas with help from professionals with the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency, UC San Diego Health, Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego, Scripps Research Institute and...
    The ‘live fast, die young’ lifestyle has taken a tragic toll on stars including Amy Winehouse, Jimi Hendrix and Marilyn Monroe.  They died in their 20s and 30s after drug and alcohol abuse. Now a major study of more than a million people has fired another warning shot over the dangers of hard partying. It shows that young adults are up to nine times more likely to develop premature heart disease if they regularly take drugs, smoke and drink.  A major study of more than a million people has fired another warning shot over the dangers of hard partying. Picture: Stock Experts looked at 1.1million people in the US, comparing their intake of alcohol, drugs and cigarettes with rates of heart attacks and strokes. They found the higher the number of substances used recreationally, the greater the risk of premature heart disease.  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Boris Johnson 'moves the goalposts': Prime Minister says... Royal sources say there is now 'no way back to official... Share this article Share The link...
    gilaxia/Getty Images New research looks at how much inflammatory foods — including red meat, refined grains, and sugary drinks — increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Study participants who ate the most inflammatory foods had a 46% higher risk of heart disease and 28% higher risk of stroke, compared to those who ate a healthier diet. But researchers found that foods high in antioxidants — leafy greens, yellow veggies like carrots and peppers, coffee, tea, and red wine — were linked to reduced inflammation and heart disease risk.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Drinking more wine and coffee and indulging in some leafy greens could be good for your heart, according to new research — especially if you also cut back on processed foods. Researchers led by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health studied up to 30 years of dietary data from 210,145 Americans to assess how much certain foods influence our heart disease and stroke risks. They found a diet high in pro-inflammatory ingredients, like processed meat and refined carbs, could...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- A London university team with the British government to begin an unusual study to potentially speed up the development of a vaccine that could help end the pandemic.Imperial College London and the NHS along with a team of researchers are starting their quest for data by infecting healthy individuals with the novel coronavirus.According to the college, the study would recruit volunteers between the ages of 18 and 30 with no previous history or symptoms of COVID-19, no underlying health conditions and no known adverse risk factors for the virus, such as heart disease, diabetes or obesity.The first round of volunteers will be exposed to the virus without being given a vaccine. Researchers will monitor patients for the level of exposure needed to become sick and their immune system's response.RELATED: Several Bay Area doctors named to California's new COVID-19 vaccine committeeVolunteers in later rounds will receive a potential vaccine prior to being infected with COVID-19."Deliberately infecting volunteers with a known human pathogen is never undertaken lightly, said Professor Peter Openshaw, co-investigator on the study. "However, such studies...
    British scientists discovered that citriodiol, the active ingredient found in some insect repellents, can kill the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. As The Sun reports, the chemical derived from the leaves and twigs of the eucalyptus citriodora appears to completely kill off the virus in some cases, which could help stop its spread. However, experts say that using the chemical alone isn’t enough. Good handwashing and the use of face masks were also recommended, in addition to using a spray containing the ingredient. British troops were sprayed with citriodiol via a product called Mosi-guard Natural because it has been known to kill other coronaviruses, the group of viruses that cause things such as the common cold. In some of the experiments, it completely killed off the novel coronavirus that is responsible for the current global pandemic. Experts suggested that it was worth giving the treatment a try on troops since it was unlikely to do any harm to those receiving it. However, the researchers caution that more data is needed to make any application recommendations. “We have no data relating the...
    Originally published in New England Living magazine BOSTON (New England Living) – Dr. Rudolph Tanzi is known as the “Rock Star Scientist” for very good reason. After being part of the team that discovered the first disease gene using human genetic markers in the 1980s, Tanzi boldly predicted that he could find a gene that caused Alzheimer’s disease. Tanzi was a student at Harvard Medical School at the time, and his superiors dismissed his hypothesis as too speculative – but, sure enough, he found it. “That got me into Alzheimer’s and I never turned back,” he says. Read more at newenglandliving.tv
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — New research is showing that coronavirus has proven to be deadlier among overweight men than men. “The way that men deposit fat and the type of fat that they deposit and the way it deposits in their body is different than women at these high BMI categories,” said Sara Tartof, Kaiser Permanente infectious disease epidemiologist. Tartof said researchers examined health records of nearly 7,000 coronavirus patients treated at a Southern California health care system who tested positive between February and May, including people from varying backgrounds and those with underlying health conditions. The report found that obese men 60 years and under are at least three times more likely to die from the virus. According to the study, women had no increased risk of coronavirus-related death associated with obesity. “It’s really a phenomenon that’s not totally uniform over the whole population. 140 in the younger ages, very high BMI is an incredibly important risk factor,” Tartof said. Despite the disparities in coronavirus infection rates and deaths in minority communities, Tartof said the research team uncovered that...
    (CNN) — A simple blood test to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease — on the wish list of many doctors, researchers and patients — may be closer to becoming a reality, according to the results of studies presented virtually this week during the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2020. In a study presented Tuesday at the conference and published in JAMA, a blood test to detect the tau protein, one of the hallmark signs of Alzheimer’s, was as accurate as a spinal tap or a positron emission tomography (PET) scan, which are the current gold standards of diagnosis while a person is living. The test could also differentiate between different types of cognitive dementia and even flag early signs of Alzheimer’s. While more research is required and such a test is likely still years away from being available, experts say the results are encouraging. “This research represents an exciting step towards developing a blood test that could help identify Alzheimer’s disease by focusing on specific sub-types of tau, one of the key proteins that becomes abnormal as part of the Alzheimer’s disease changes...
    (CNN)A simple blood test to diagnose Alzheimer's disease -- on the wish list of many doctors, researchers and patients -- may be closer to becoming a reality, according to the results of studies presented virtually this week during the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2020.In a study presented Tuesday at the conference and published in JAMA, a blood test to detect the tau protein, one of the hallmark signs of Alzheimer's, was as accurate as a spinal tap or a positron emission tomography (PET) scan, which are the current gold standards of diagnosis while a person is living. More research is required and such a test is likely still years away from being available, but researchers said the results are promising. "This research represents an exciting step towards developing a blood test that could help identify Alzheimer's disease by focusing on specific sub-types of tau, one of the key proteins that becomes abnormal as part of the Alzheimer's disease changes in the brain," said Clive Ballard, professor of age-related disease at the University of Exeter Medical School, in the UK, who...
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