Saturday, Aug 13, 2022 - 08:50:03
15 results - (0.006 seconds)

a small piece:

latest news at page 1:
1
    Drew Angerer/Getty Images Madeleine Albright died Wednesday, but 30 days before her passing, she took a shot at Russian President Vladimir Putin in a blistering op-ed. The former Secretary of State died of cancer at the age of 84, her family said in a statement. She remained active by commenting on international affairs until the end of her life. The Czechoslovakia-born first female head of the State Department often wrote guest essays. In her finally piece for the New York Times, Albright evaluated Putin. On Feb. 23, a day before Russia’s autocratic leader ordered an invasion into Ukraine, Albright lit him up. In a piece titled “Putin Is Making a Historic Mistake,” the fiery former diplomat described an encounter with him, In early 2000, I became the first senior U.S. official to meet with Vladimir Putin in his new capacity as acting president of Russia. We in the Clinton administration did not know much about him at the time — just that he had started his career in the K.G.B. I hoped the meeting would help me take the measure of...
    What did the Beast say? In the article, the Daily Beast claimed that "experts" and "multiple residents" were "enraged at the embrace of a far-right catchphrase." But only one resident and one unrelated former New Jersey police officer are quoted in the article offering substantive criticism. "Can’t believe he wore that in public to a party," the area resident, who wished to remain anonymous, said. "Experts on criminal justice were aghast at the chief’s choice of apparel," the article stated, going on to quote Richard Rivera, a former New Jersey police officer who reportedly served as an expert witness in misconduct cases. "There are a million ugly Christmas sweaters the police chief could have worn," Rivera, who is now a police director in Penns Grove, told the outlet, noting that Ciambrone’s sweater choice did not violate any rules or regulations but sent a troubling message. "Police executives should refrain from making comments that violate their agency rules of conduct or portray police in a poor light where it would question their ability to fairly and impartially enforce the law," he...
    WE are now only days away from Christmas, which means if you haven’t begun wrapping your presents, you should get to it. Last minute prep means you may bump into dilemmas along the way— like running out of wrapping paper. 4Sometimes the final piece of wrapping paper doesn't seem large enough to entirely cover a giftCredit: TikTok 4But this woman said you only need to adjust the positioning and the way you foldCredit: TikTok Thankfully, one woman on TikTok has got you covered. @BeeandBlooms gained a following on social media thanks to her aesthetically appealing videos that teach viewers useful gift-wrapping hacks. She recently posted a clip that showcased a problem we’ve all faced during the holidays: struggling to cover a present entirely with a final, small piece of wrapping paper. The clip began with a gift box placed in the center of a square piece of wrapping paper. She tried to fold the gift wrap over the box lengthwise and crosswise, but neither option fully covered it. Her solution? Most read in LifestyleSHE'S HURTING Kate Middleton 'really upset' about...
    OAKLYN, N.J. (CBS) — They started their small business in the 1940s and all of these years later, it’s still going strong. “If you’re buying a car and you want to buy a BMW or Mercedes or Lexus, well that would be us as furniture,” said. “This is the reclining division. Flex Steel is a great company.” READ MORE: After Summer Shooting In Center City Airbnb, Councilmember Pushes For Short-Term Rental Rules By End Of Year For 80 years, Nastasi’s Furniture and Mattresses have sat on the White Horse Pike in Oaklyn offering a haven for homemakers looking for American-made pieces that tell a story of their style for a generation. “I have a friend, his grandmother bought a grandfather clock from Nastasi’s in 1960,” Matt Lawson Jr. said. “That’s a sentimental piece that told a story and forever, that’s a family heirloom piece, and we’re a part of it.” “The main thing is keeping an American business going and selling American products,” Matt Lawson said. “I just feel like something I have to do.” READ MORE: Fourth Stimulus Check:...
    EXETER, NH (CBS) – A small piece of glass caused a big health scare for a young New Hampshire girl. The doctor who helped save six-year-old Alaina Harrington’s life says it’s remarkable how a tiny shard of glass could have been deadly, saying it’s a prime example for parents to always trust their gut instincts. “It just blows my mind,” said Maeghan Silvestri, Alaina’s mother. READ MORE: Students Organize COVID Vaccine Clinic At Charlestown High School A tiny shard of glass less than one-inch long could have been devastating for six-year-old Alaina had it not been for her mother, who’s also a nurse. Piece of glass removed from Alaina Harrington’s chest (WBZ-TV) It was the evening of March 14 as the family was preparing dinner when Alaina accidentally broke a glass. “Instead of dropping the glass, she caught it and pulled it into her chest,” Silvestri explained. READ MORE: Newton Public Schools Addresses Two Racial Incidents At Elementary School She had a small cut on her chest, but nothing too alarming until she told her mother...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- The Better Government Association has a new piece on Black-owned businesses and their experiences with applying to PPP funding.BGA focused on Chicago's West Side and west suburbs, where four small business owners and nonprofit leaders talked about the process, concerns and their thoughts on how it could improve to better support small businesses of color.BGA also compiled five tips people can use based on the learning experiences of the four business owners interviewed.RELATED: New businesses open doors in Matteson following year of COVID shutdownsThis piece was in collaboration with Austin Weekly News, Village Free Press and Catchlight Local.Visit BetterGov.org for more information.
    Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters. Each Friday, we bring you an article from our archives to propel you into the weekend. The word “downsizing” seems to have been downsized. Looking back in the newspaper archives, there is a steep climb from 1990 to 1996 in the use of the word “downsizing” in stories. Then, it levels off—much higher than before, but well below its peak—and it plods along from there. Personally, I haven’t heard it in a few years. (Except for that Alexander Payne movie, which I reviewed long ago.) We have other terms for the horror of losing your job: laid off, fired, let go. Downsizing now might even refer more often to empty nesters scaling down to a smaller house as the nuclear family cools its reactors with kids off to college. (My personal formative experience with downsizing was Office Space.) Downsizing refers to slashing jobs in a more permanent sense. It means restructuring and cutting the assumed fat;...
    After propelling the Rangers to a 6-3 win over the Devils with three goals Saturday afternoon, Pavel Buchnevich admitted a hat trick was one of the better birthday gifts he had given himself. It was the first three-goal game of his career and allowed the Rangers to pull within four points of the fourth playoff spot in the East Division. If that isn’t special enough, Buchnevich also became the first player in franchise history to record a hat trick on his birthday. “But it’s only once a year,” Buchnevich said with a smile. Asked about his growth over his five seasons in New York, Buchnevich said he is starting to understand his role and what coaches want from him better than ever before. The 26-year-old winger got the Rangers going at 7:26 of the first period, burying a pass from Mika Zibanejad on a 2-on-1 rush for a 1-0 lead. “It’s been a lot of fun playing alongside him and seeing his growth over the years I’ve been here with him,” Zibanejad said. “I feel like he does it all...
    The connection between the first spacecraft to fly to Earth and the first small helicopter scheduled to fly to Mars in the coming weeks: The ingenious helicopter, which was scheduled to fly its first flight to a neighboring planet in a few weeks, was attached to a piece of cloth from the Wright brothers’ plane, which first flew in December 1903 in North Carolina. This was announced by the American Space Agency. The small helicopter, which arrived on Mars with the “Perseverance” spacecraft, is scheduled to attempt orbit the planet before April 8. The piece of cloth was transferred to NASA from the base of the left by the Historical Museum in Dayton, Ohio, the city where the Wright brothers grew up. Documents for the spacecraft landing on Mars lasted (Photo: NASA) “Wilbur and Orville Wright departed in 1903 and are pleased to learn that a small portion of the Flyer I aircraft that reached a quarter of a mile is going to make history on Mars,” said Amanda Wright Lane and Stephen Wright. On...
    In recent months it has been seen how the trends that reached the stores made more than one raise their eyebrows up. Great hits from the 2000s have returned, such as low-rise jeans, velvet tracksuits or the fashion of showing the thong, but also other out of nowhere such as wearing white socks over trousers. Another of those trends that seems to have arrived as if by magic is that of costume jewelery with chilli peppers. Yes, you read it right. Chilli peppers have become the design par excellence in necklaces, bracelets or earrings for this spring and summer. (Photo: ZARA) This spicy accessory has reached major brands low cost like Zara, which has presented a chilli and pearl necklace in its new collection, as well as hoop earrings in the same style. (Photo: CASILDA FINAT) It is also common in small high-end jewelry stores such as Lemoyne Concept, which has put on sale a simple design with a gold-plated chain and a large piece of chilli pottery. In Tabitha Jewels they have given the accessory a twist and have...
    Alexandria’s temporarily reborn Landmark Mall plays an early starring role in “Wonder Woman 1984,” as Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman makes easy work of a bunch of terribly dressed and coiffed baddies who had just robbed a store there. Among the many ways our superhero handles the villains: She effortlessly launches one through a giant drum emblazoned with the familiar slogan, “Virginia is for Lovers.” That was no accident. It was a 7-foot-tall product placement for the commonwealth of Virginia’s now 51-year-old tourism campaign — the longest-running in the United States.  “Having millions of audience members now see the iconic ‘Virginia is for Lovers’ logo up on both the large and small screens provides immeasurable brand visibility that will have a positive effect for years to come,” Andy Edmunds, director of the Virginia Film Office, said in a statement. And now the prop is going on display in Old Town, as the city of Alexandria and its small businesses aim to take advantage… Read the full story from the Washington Business Journal.
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – There is a possible major breakthrough in the battle against COVID-19. Researchers in Pittsburgh have developed a drug that completely neutralizes the coronavirus. LINK: More Coverage From Our Colleagues At CBS Pittsburgh The potential drug is called AB-8, a small piece of the anti-COVID antibodies that have been used to treat COVID patients by blocking or neutralizing the coronavirus. But this very small molecule appears to have major advantages over other drugs, and perhaps even vaccines. The wide range of antibodies contained in convalescent plasma – plasma from recovered COVID patients – have variable effectiveness in COVID patients. Now researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center have found the precise piece of the effective antibody that blocks coronavirus. The way antibodies work against COVID is by attaching to and blocking the so-called spike protein that the coronavirus uses to attach to specific receptors on human cells. Through painstaking molecular analysis, the UPMC scientists identified a tiny piece of those neutralizing antibodies. Called AB-8, it’s the part that actually performs most of the virus blocking. Its small...
    After two years stuck inside a little boy’s nose, this Lego piece has finally fallen free. New Zealander Sameer Anwar, 7, inserted a small Lego block up his shnoz in 2018 — a fact he informed his parents about at the time. “One day he just told us he had slipped in a tiny piece of Lego and then we tried our best to bring it out but nothing came out,” Anwar’s father, Mudassir Anwar, told the New Zealand Herald. “I did it by purpose,” Anwar told local TV hosts, while admitting he didn’t anticipate it would stay up there as long as it did. “I was frightened and surprised.” Anwar’s father and his wife had a local doctor look up Sameer’s nose afterward, but the medical professional was unable to spot the small black plastic piece. The Lego may have already passed into Sameer’s digestive system, where it would be naturally processed, the doctor suggested — or, possibly, it may never have gotten lodged in his nose at all. The Kiwi boy, who hails from Dunedin in the...
1