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    Former President Donald Trump has not presented any evidence showing he went through "the process" of declassifying documents at the center of a Justice Department investigation, a top House Democrat declared on Sunday. Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) made the point nearly a week after an FBI raid at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort touched off a firestorm over national security. TRUMP RECORDS NEGOTIATOR WARNS OF RUSSIAGATE MATERIALS COVER-UP "The president has broad declassification authority when he is in office, but typically, a declassification is memorialized in some way. Can you seek out the answer to the question of whether there actually is record of whether Donald Trump declassified that? That's his defense here, that anything he had, he had already declassified," Face the Nation anchor Margaret Brennan said on CBS. "Yes, we should determine, you know, whether there was any effort during the presidency to go through the process of declassification," Schiff replied. "I've seen no evidence of that, nor have they presented any evidence of that. The idea, first of all, a former president has no declassification authority....
    One of the lawyers working for Former President Donald Trump signed a written statement in June confirming that all classified material had been returned to the government. The declaration was given to the Department of Justice on June 3 after a visit to Mar-a-Lago by top counterintelligence official Jay I. Bratt. Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home this week was raided by the FBI after authorities claim that the former president held onto a trove of classified documents after leaving office. Four people with knowledge of the document told the New York Times that it is possible Trump and his team were not fully forthcoming with investigators about the material.  He is currently under investigation for obstruction of justice and violating the Espionage Act, according to the newly unsealed search warrant showing the FBI retrieved 11 sets of classified documents from Mar-a-Lago.   The former president insisted Friday that everything was 'declassified' and agents 'didn't need to seize anything.' Some of the documents were marked 'top secret' and are meant to be kept in specialized government facilities, according to a copy of the warrant. The FBI...
    Washington (CNN)The US government has a formal system of protecting information that, if disclosed, could hurt national security. The system can apply to documents regarding intelligence activities, foreign relations, military plans and programs for safeguarding nuclear materials, for example. By classifying information, the government restricts who can see the documents and where he or she can see them. The Justice Department recently removed some classified documents from former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago residence while executing a search warrant for possible violations of the Espionage Act and other crimes.Here are key things to know about how the classification system works.What are the levels of classification?Read MoreThere are three basic levels of classification, based on the damage that could be done to national security if the information was leaked. Top SecretThis is the highest level of classification. Information is classified as Top Secret if it "reasonably could be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security," according to a 2009 executive order that describes the classification system. A subset of Top Secret documents known as SCI, or sensitive compartmented information,...
    The National Archives and Records Administration pushed back on former President Donald Trump’s assertions that his predecessor, Barack Obama, had taken classified documents from the White House as he faces intense scrutiny over records he possessed after federal officials raided his Florida home. After the FBI reportedly seized 11 sets of classified documents from Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence in a raid on Monday, Trump decried the search as being politically motivated and insisted Obama had taken “30 million pages of documents” when he left office in 2017, a claim which the NARA responded to on Friday, noting it maintains “exclusive legal and physical custody” of Obama’s records. TRUMP PUSHES BACK ON MAR-A-LAGO RAID, CLAIMS DOCUMENTS WERE ‘DECLASSIFIED’ “NARA moved approximately 30 million pages of unclassified records to a NARA facility in the Chicago area, where they are maintained exclusively by NARA,” the agency said in a statement. “Additionally, NARA maintains the classified Obama Presidential records in a NARA facility in the Washington, DC, area. As required by the [Presidential Records Act], former President Obama has no control...
    The National Archives snapped back on Friday at Donald Trump's claim that Barack Obama took 33 million pages of classified documents from the White House, saying it was not true. The agency said, in accordance with the Presidential Records Act (PRA), Obama's unclassified presidential records are in a facility they control in Chicago while the classified Obama records are in a secure facility in the Washington D.C. area. Obama has no control over them, the agency said.  'As required by the PRA, former President Barack Obama has no control over where and how NARA stores the presidential records of his administration,' the National Archives and Records Administration noted in a statement. Trump alleged on Friday that Obama kept 'lots' of classified documents after leaving the White House. 'President Barack Hussein Obama kept 33 million pages of documents, much of them classified,' Trump said in a post on Truth Social. 'How many of them pertained to nuclear? Word is, lots!' Trump mentioned Obama in multiple Truth Social posts on Thursday that asked 'what happened' to millions of pages of documents he...
    Brandon Bell/Getty Images The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) released a statement on Friday roundly debunking former President Donald Trump’s allegation that former President Barack Obama improperly handled classified records. Trump has made the allegation multiple times but repeated it yet again on Friday morning in a statement. “President Barack Hussein Obama kept 33 million pages of documents, much of them classified. How many of them pertained to nuclear? Word is, lots!” Trump wrote in an email release via his Save America PAC. The NARA hit back and offered the facts surrounding the documents Obama, like all ex-presidents, took to be placed in his presidential library. “The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) assumed exclusive legal and physical custody of Obama Presidential records when President Barack Obama left office in 2017, in accordance with the Presidential Records Act (PRA),” the statement began, adding: NARA moved approximately 30 million pages of unclassified records to a NARA facility in the Chicago area where they are maintained exclusively by NARA. Additionally, NARA maintains the classified Obama Presidential records in a NARA facility...
    The FBI recovered 11 sets of classified documents from Mar-a-Lago during their raid on Monday, according to a report released Friday. Some of the documents were marked 'top secret' and are meant to be kept in specialized government facilities, the Wall Street Journal reported after seeing a copy of the search inventory.  Agents recovered 20 boxes in total from the Florida estate, according to the report, with the rest including handwritten notes, photo binders, the grant of clemency of Roger Stone and a file with 'information on the President of France'.  The warrant is believed to have given FBI agents permission to search in Trump's office and all storage areas on the premises, and states four sets of top secret documents, three sets of secret documents, and three sets of confidential documents were retrieved. Trump's attorneys claimed former President Trump declassified the documents before he left office. A president has the power to declassify any document, but there is a strict federal procedure for doing so.  The former president took to Truth Social on Friday morning to compare the latest allegations to...
    United States Congressman Mike Turner (R-Ohio) suggested on Friday that the nuclear documents that the Federal Bureau of Investigation reportedly recovered from former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago mansion in Palm Beach, Florida during the execution of a search warrant on Monday are no big deal. "I can tell you that there are a number of things that are classified that fall under the umbrella of nuclear weapons but that are not necessarily things that are truly classified," Turner, who serves on the House Intelligence Committee, told reporters at a press conference. "Many of them you can find on your own phone as we stand here and if they fall into that category, they're not an imminent national security threat that would rise to the level of, you have to raid Donald Trump's home and spend nine hours there." There are "two types of classification," according to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's website. "The first type, known as national security information, is information that is classified by an Executive Order. Its release would damage national security to some degree. The second...
    Donald Trump claims it is a 'hoax' to suggest FBI agents were looking for documents related to nuclear weapons when they searched Mar-a-Lago on Monday. The former president took to Truth Social on Friday morning to compare the latest allegations to 'Russia, Russia, Russia', impeachment and the Steele Dossier, and again suggested that law enforcement could have 'planted' evidence. The post criticizing agents for banning his lawyers from watching the search came just hours after he said he backed a Florida judge unsealing the search warrant that led to the search on his estate on Monday. His lawyers have until 3pm on Friday to object to the release.  'Nuclear weapons issue is a Hoax, just like Russia, Russia, Russia was a Hoax, two Impeachments were a Hoax, the Mueller investigation was a Hoax, and much more,' Trump wrote Friday morning.  He added: 'Same sleazy people involved. Why wouldn’t the FBI allow the inspection of areas at Mar-a-Lago with our lawyer’s, or others, present. Made them wait outside in the heat, wouldn’t let them get even close - said “ABSOLUTELY NOT.” Planting...
    Donald Trump has called for the release of the search warrant in the FBI raid on his Florida resort, following reports that the search was related to classified documents regarding nuclear weapons. Late on Friday, Trump said he would not challenge the release of the warrant, after Attorney General Merrick Garland said he would petition for the document to be unsealed. According to Garland, Trump's attorneys do have their own copies of both the warrant and the receipt for items seized in Monday's raid -- documents that are routinely provided to the target of a court-approved search.  If Trump does have the warrant and receipt as Garland says, it's unclear why he would not simply publish them himself, which he has a right to do. Trump announced his stance in a post on his Truth Social network. 'Not only will I not oppose the release of documents related to the un American, unwarranted, and unnecessary raid and break-in of my home in Palm Beach, Florida, Mar-a-Lago, I am going a step further by ENCOURAGING the immediate release of those documents,' he...
    Attorney General Merrick Garland will make an in-person statement on Thursday afternoon after growing calls from Republicans for him to speak out about the FBI's unannounced search of Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort. It's not clear what the attorney general will be discussing. His last-minute appearance is coming days after the former president claimed his home was 'raided' by federal agents who apparently broke a padlocked door and seized documents sought by the National Archives. Trump has been fuming since revealing news of the search on Monday night, when he said it meant 'dark times for our nation.'  And a day later, FBI agents seized the cellphone of Pennsylvania Rep. Scott Perry, one of Trump's top allies in Congress who allegedly aided his efforts to try to steal the 2020 election. But that seizure was related to another Justice Department investigation of the former president, regarding a 'fake-electors scheme' that he and his allies are accused of promoting to stay in power. The raid on Trump's home comes months after the National Archives asked the Justice Department to open an investigation...
    The U.S. Dept. of Justice served Donald Trump with a grand jury subpoena months before the FBI raided the former President’s Mar-a-Lago home Monday, according to a right wing media outlet. News of the existence of the grand jury subpoena being served on Trump months ago comes from Just the News, a website created by John Solomon. Solomon is a longtime journalist who in 2019 was labeled by The Daily Beast as “the Trumpian right’s favorite ‘investigative reporter,'” and the “Trump-friendly scribe” whose “Biden-Ukraine conspiracies were cited multiple times in the whistleblower memo.” “Many of his co-workers are ashamed to be associated with him,” The Daily Beast reported, citing “his questionable reporting, which often seems specifically tailored to stoke the flames of right-wing paranoia.” READ MORE: ‘Same Answer’: Trump Sat Across From the NY Attorney General and Pleaded the Fifth to Each Question For About 5 Hours Solomon on Thursday writes: “Two months before his Florida home was raided by the FBI, former President Donald Trump secretly received a grand jury subpoena for classified documents belonging to the National Archives,...
    By Eric Tucker | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The year was 2016, the presidential candidate under investigation was Hillary Clinton and the FBI director at the time, James Comey, laid out the factors the Justice Department weighs in deciding whether to charge someone with mishandling classified records. Fast forward to 2022 and that tutorial proves instructive as another candidate from that election, Donald Trump, is entangled in an FBI probe related to sensitive government documents. Whether an FBI search of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence is a prelude to criminal charges is unknown. The action Monday nonetheless focuses attention on the thicket of statutes that govern the handling of government records, though the department’s own history of prosecutorial discretion — some high-profile investigations have ended without charges or in misdemeanor plea deals — makes it hard to forecast with certainty what might happen this time. “These are statutes that have historically not been enforced to the fullest extent,” said University of Texas law professor Stephen Vladeck. Much remains uncertain about Monday’s search, including precisely what documents the FBI was looking for —...
    OutFront host Erin Burnett confronted Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) with comments he made at the 2016 Republican National Convention, where he slammed Hillary Clinton over her handling of classified information. Earlier in the interview, Hutchinson called on the Department of Justice to explain why the FBI raided the Florida home of former President Donald Trump on Monday. Agents executed a search warrant to retrieve official documents from his time as president. They were supposed to be turned over to the National Archives, but instead ended up at his Mar-a-Lago estate. Some of the materials are reportedly classified. The National Archives confirmed in February that Trump had taken classified documents to Florida, which have since been retrieved. “We do know from our reporting the search warrant itself as it was written was related to Trump’s handling of classified documents, and one source says the authorities suspected he withheld documents with national security implications,” Burnett told Hutchinson. “So on that front, governor, when we were searching, we found something that you had said back in 2016 and I wanted to play...
    Former CIA official Philip Mudd downplayed FBI agents finding classified documents in former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida during a raid on Monday. It’s common for government officials to bring classified documents home with them accidentally because files are often “overclassified,” Mudd, a former deputy director of the National Counterterrorism Center and the FBI’s National Security Branch, said during a CNN appearance on Tuesday. Therefore, the process of obtaining a search warrant for the residence of a former president would require much more than just seeking classified documents, he added. TIMELINE OF TRUMP RAID: HOW IT ALL UNFOLDED “The chance the attorney general and the FBI director went in and said, ‘Hey, he’s got some secret document down there he hasn’t given us, and to ensure we recover those, we’re just going to go to Mar-a-Lago,' I would put that near zero,” Mudd explained. “To get to the bar where you’re going to the residence of the former president, classified documents don’t get you there. I had them in my house sometimes, inappropriately. It...
    By Zeke Miller, Eric Tucker and Michael Balsamo | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The FBI’s unprecedented search of former President Donald Trump’s Florida residence ricocheted around government, politics and a polarized country Tuesday along with questions as to why the Justice Department — notably cautious under Attorney General Merrick Garland — decided to take such a drastic step. Answers weren’t quickly forthcoming. Agents on Monday searched Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate, which is also a private club, as part of a federal investigation into whether the former president took classified records from the White House to his Florida residence, people familiar with the matter said. It marked a dramatic escalation of law enforcement scrutiny of Trump, who faces an array of inquiries tied to his conduct in the waning days of his administration. From echoes of Watergate to the more immediate House probe of the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, Washington, a city used to sleepy Augusts, reeled from one speculative or accusatory headline to the next. Was the Justice Department politicized? What prompted it to seek authorization to search the estate for...
    Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida was raided by the FBI on Monday night, the former president revealed in a furious and lengthy statement. The unannounced search was related to White House documents sought by the National Archives, his son Eric Trump told Fox News later that night. Federal agents 'ransacked' his father's office, he said, and in his own statement the former president accused them of breaking into his safe. But Trump's issues with the National Archives reportedly began before he even left office.  Politico reported in 2018 that aides were forced to follow the then-president around to tape back documents that he had shredded - a habit the Republican was known for during his prior life heading the Trump Organization - in fear of running afoul of record-keeping laws. And late last year, Trump attempted to slow the release of presidential documents from the National Archives to the House select committee investigating the January 6 attack. It's not clear what specifically is being investigated, but it's worth noting there are laws on the books against tampering and destruction...
    Newly disclosed documents have revealed the United States government's plans in the event of a potential apocalypses - which include putting the kibosh on all civilian communications during wartime. The previously classified files, obtained by the NYU nonpartisan nonprofit the Brennan Center for Justice, detail wartime powers the president can enact in the case of a national emergency - such as a nuclear attack. The center obtained the 500 pages files through a Freedom of Information Act request. A further 6,000 pages were kept classified.  Several of the files, which were all penned during the administration of George W. Bush, detail a law that permits the president to take over or shut down communications networks in wartime.  The policy, called the Communications Act, asserts that 'during the continuance of a war in which the United States is engaged, the President is authorized, if he finds it necessary for the national defense and security,' to nix civilians' means of communication. 'He may give these directions at and for such times as he may determine,' the guidance goes on, 'and may modify, change, suspend, or annul them...
    By Kaitlin Collins and Evan Perez | CNN Investigators issued a subpoena to the National Archives and Records Administration for access to classified documents that were taken to former President Donald Trump‘s home in Florida, according to two people familiar with the matter. The move is the first overt indication of an ongoing investigation into the handling of classified White House documents that were taken to the former President’s Mar-a-Lago residence after he left office. The subpoena is part of the formal process that FBI investigators and Justice Department prosecutors use to take possession of the boxes of documents from the Archives, which retrieved the boxes from the Florida resort. The New York Times, which first reported on the subpoena, also said that interviews have been requested with people who worked in the White House at the end of the Trump presidency. The White House declined to comment. In February, the Archives requested a review of whether Trump violated the Presidential Records Act — which requires that all records created by presidents be turned over to the National Archives at...
    Washington (CNN)Investigators issued a subpoena to the National Archives and Records Administration for access to classified documents that were taken to former President Donald Trump's home in Florida, according to two people familiar with the matter. The move is the first overt indication of an ongoing investigation into the handling of classified White House documents that were taken to the former President's Mar-a-Lago residence after he left office.The subpoena is part of the formal process that FBI investigators and Justice Department prosecutors use to take possession of the boxes of documents from the Archives, which retrieved the boxes from the Florida resort. The New York Times, which first reported on the subpoena, also said that interviews have been requested with people who worked in the White House at the end of the Trump presidency.The White House declined to comment.Read MoreIn February, the Archives requested a review of whether Trump violated the Presidential Records Act -- which requires that all records created by presidents be turned over to the National Archives at the end of their administrations -- and other possible...
    A grand jury investigation has apparently been opened into how classified material ended up in former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. Prosecutors involved with the inquiry have subpoenaed the National Archives and Records Administration for the classified material in question and issued requests for interviews from former Trump administration officials, the New York Times reported. BIDEN AUTHORIZES TRANSFER OF MORE TRUMP RECORDS TO JAN. 6 COMMITTEE The subpoena was issued in recent days and coincided with a slew of other requests the Justice Department made for records from the National Archives, according to the report. The inquiry was sparked by the discovery of classified material in a trove of 15 boxes the National Archives officials obtained from Trump's resort in January. National Archives officials had reached out to Trump after learning he had some presidential documents, such as notes from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and former President Barack Obama. After reviewing the 15 boxes, National Archives officials discovered material that was labeled "classified national security information" and referred the matter to the...
    (CNN)The Justice Department is blocking the National Archives from sharing details with Congress on 15 boxes of records, including classified information that former President Donald Trump took to Mar-a-Lago after leaving office, the clearest indication yet that the matter is under investigation.In a letter that the House Oversight Committee disclosed Thursday, Archives General Counsel Gary Stern said the agency was unable to respond to the panel's request for more information pertaining to its own investigation into the Mar-a-Lago boxes, based on the Archives' "consultation" with the Justice Department.After receiving the March 28 letter from the National Archives, also known as NARA, House Oversight Committee Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney, a Democrat from New York, reached out to Attorney General Merrick Garland requesting additional information as to why the Justice Department is preventing the Archives from cooperating with the panel."I write today because the Department of Justice is preventing NARA from cooperating with the Committee's request, which is interfering with the Committee's investigation," she wrote in a letter dated Thursday. "By blocking NARA from producing the documents requested by the Committee, the Department...
    BALTIMORE (AP) — A National Security Agency employee has been charged with emailing classified national security information to somebody who wasn’t authorized to receive it, according to a federal indictment unsealed Thursday. Mark Robert Unkenholz, 60, of Hanover, Maryland, was arrested Thursday and scheduled to make his initial court appearance in Baltimore later in the day. Unkenholz held “top secret” security clearance, giving him access to the information, according to a 26-count indictment. He worked for an NSA office responsible for the agency’s engagement with private industry. The indictment accuses Unkenholz of using his personal email address to send information classified as “secret” and “top secret” to somebody else’s private company email addresses on several occasions between February 2018 and June 2020. The recipient held “top secret” clearance from April 2016 until approximately June 2019, while employed at a company that isn’t named in the indictment. However, from July 2019 until approximately January 2021, the person worked for a different company and wasn’t authorized to access or receive classified information, the indictment says. A grand jury indicted Unkenholz on Tuesday...
    A National Security Council (NSC) staffer pushed out under former President TrumpDonald TrumpJan. 6 panel claims Trump 'engaged in criminal conspiracy' Capitol riot defendant pleads guilty to seditious conspiracy, agrees to cooperate The Memo: Boebert's antics blasted as another twist in politics' downward spiral   MORE has been rehired by the Biden administration. Ellen Knight, a government classification expert, is now working at the NSC as senior director for records, access, and information security management, NSC spokeswoman Emily Horne told The New York Times. “Ellen Knight is a dedicated career public servant,” Horne said in a statement, according to the paper. “We’re thankful to have her return to the National Security Council as the senior director for records, access, and information security management, and benefit from her extensive experience in classified information management.” During the Trump administration Knight worked at the NSC on a two-year detail assignment from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). She was involved with the prepublication review process for former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonGOP senators push back hard on Trump's praise of Putin John...
    The 15 boxes of documents Donald Trump unlawfully removed from the White House and infamously stored in his personal suite at Mar-a-Lago are so highly classified that “only a very few” federal government officials have clearance to see them. “There are records that only a very few have clearances” to review, a source tells The Washington Post in a report published Friday. The paper explains the “documents are so sensitive that they may not be able to describe them in an unclassified way.” House Oversight Committee Chair Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) has requested from the National Archives a “detailed description of the contents of the boxes recovered from Mar-a-Lago … and identification of any items that are classified and the level of classification.” “The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) provided new details of what appear to be the largest-scale violations of the Presidential Records Act since its enactment,” Chairwoman Maloney wrote in a letter sent to the Archives, CNN adds. The Post also reports the National Archives confirmed its prior reporting that those cartons contained both classified materials, and torn...
    Former US president Donald Trump fired back at the National Archives Friday night after the agency said he took classified documents from the White House to Mar-a-Lago when he left office.   'The National Archives did not 'find' anything, they were given, upon request, Presidential Records in an ordinary and routine process,' Trump said in a statement Friday night.   'If this was anyone but `Trump,´ there would be no story here,' he said. 'Instead, Democrats are in search of their next scam.' Classified information was found in the 15 boxes of White House records that were stored at Trump's Mar-a-Lago residence, the National Archives and Records Administration said earlier Friday in a letter that confirmed the matter has been sent to the Justice Department.   Federal law bars the removal of classified documents to unauthorized locations, though it is possible that Trump could try to argue that, as president, he was the ultimate declassification authority. No matter the legal risk, it exposes him to charges of hypocrisy given his relentless attacks during the 2016 presidential campaign on Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton for her...
    WASHINGTON (CBSMiami/AP) — The National Archives has contacted the Department of Justice over classified records at Mar-a-Lago after former President Donald Trump left office, according to a letter from Archivist David Ferriero to the House Oversight Committee. The classified information was found in the 15 boxes of White House records that were stored at Trump’s Florida residence. READ MORE: Miami-Dade Parents Upset Over Legislation That Would Financially Punish Schools For Defying DeSantis' Anti-Mask RulesThe letter from the agency follows numerous reports around Trump’s handling of sensitive and even classified information during his time as president and after he left the White House. The revelation could also interest federal investigators responsible for policing the handling of government secrets, though the Justice Department and FBI have not indicated they will pursue. Federal law bars the removal of classified documents to unauthorized locations, though it is possible that Trump could try to argue that, as president, he was the ultimate declassification authority. No matter the legal risk, it exposes him to charges of hypocrisy given his relentless attacks during the 2016 presidential campaign...
    The National Archives delivered more damning revelations in a letter Friday, finding that Trump White House aides were conducting official government business via non-approved non-government electronic messaging apps. NARA also confirmed that there were “items marked as classified national security information” in the 15 boxes being stored in the former president’s Mar-a-Lago suite, in violation of federal law. “NARA has also learned that some White House staff conducted official business using non-official electronic messaging accounts that were not copied or forwarded into their official electronic messaging accounts, as required by section 2209 of the PRA,” it said referring to the Presidential Records Act. Trump won office in 2016 in part by distorting and politicizing Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email address and server, which were not violations of law. The National Archives letter makes clear classified documents were in fact in those 15 cartons, and that it has contacted the DOJ. “Because NARA identified classified information in the boxes, NARA staff has been in communication with the Department of Justice.” It also reveals that as far back as 2018...
    The National Archives has confirmed that former President Donald Trump took classified national security documents with him to Mar-a-Lago after leaving the White House in January 2021. The New York Times reports that the National Archives sent a letter to Congress in which it confirmed that it has "identified items marked as classified national security information within the boxes" that were removed from Mar-a-Lago earlier this year after the Supreme Court ruled that Trump could not shield January 6th-related documents from the House Select Committee investigating the Capitol riots. "Because NARA identified classified information in the boxes, NARA staff has been in communication with the Department of Justice," the letter, which was written by National Archivist David Ferriero, added. While there have been reports for weeks that the National Archives found classified documents in Trump's Mar-a-Lago records, this is the first time that the agency has publicly confirmed these reports. Revelations about Trump removing classified documents from the White House weren't the only intriguing part of the letter, as Ferriero also revealed that "some White House staff conducted official business...
    Former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort is seen on February 10, 2021 in Palm Beach, Florida.Joe Raedle | Getty Images The National Archives and Records Administration confirmed Friday that items marked "classified" were among the 15 boxes of White House records retrieved from former President Donald Trump's home, Mar-a-Lago, last month. The National Archives told a House committee that it "has identified items marked as classified national security information within the boxes." The discovery of those classified documents in Trump's Palm Beach, Florida, home prompted NARA staff to reach out to the Department of Justice, U.S. Archivist David Ferriero told the House Oversight and Reform Committee in a letter. All 15 of those boxes should have been handed over to the National Archives directly from the White House once Trump left office in January 2021, as required by law, the agency has noted. The Presidential Records Act requires that all applicable materials, such as documents, photos, correspondence and pamphlets, must be preserved and transferred to the National Archives as soon as the president leaves office. A spokeswoman for Trump did not immediately...
    (CNN)The National Archives acknowledged Friday it has discussed with the Department of Justice that classified records were found in boxes at Mar-a-Lago after former President Donald Trump left office, according to a letter from Archivist David Ferriero to the House Oversight Committee.This story is breaking and will be updated.
    The National Archives confirmed on Friday that Donald Trump took classified documents from the White House to Mar-a-Lago when he left office  The National Archives confirmed on Friday that Donald Trump took classified documents from the White House to Mar-a-Lago when he left office. The agency has informed Congress and is now in talks with the Justice Department about an investigation after the sensitive material was found in 15 boxes seized from his Florida home. 'Because NARA identified classified information in the boxes, NARA staff has been in communication with the Department of Justice,' said the letter, written by David S. Ferriero, the national archivist, to Democratic Rep. Carolyn Maloney. Ferriero has also said that White House staffers conducted official business using 'non-official electronic messaging accounts that were not copied or forwarded into their official electronic messaging accounts'.  It is the latest in a series of revelations in the past two weeks about Trump's handling of files when he left office, including claims he stuffed documents down the White House toilet and got the Pentagon to incinerate papers. Among the other...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The 15 boxes of White House records that were stored at former President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence contained items marked as classified national security information, the National Archives and Records Administration said Friday. The agency said the matter has been referred to the Justice Department. In a response to a Feb. 9 letter to the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, the National Archives confirmed reports that Trump took government records with him down to Florida after he left office in January 2021. House lawmakers had opened an investigation and the National Archives has reportedly asked the Justice Department to look into the matter. The Justice Department and the FBI have not yet said what, if anything, they’ll do. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    n a rare Fox News moment, host Bret Baier reported that many are concerned about the lack of Republican “alarm” over Donald Trump absconding with at least 15 cartons of documents and other items, some of which were classified, or even “top secret” classified, and storing them in his suite at Mar-a-Lago, compared to the massive coverage the media gave the Hillary Clinton email story. U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), who is the Ranking Member on the Intelligence Committee, and also serves on the Foreign Relations Committee, responded by saying “it’s not a crime” to break federal law – the Presidential Records Act of 1978, in this case, by removing the documents or flushing them down the toilet. It seems odd that the Ranking Member of the Senate Intelligence Committee would be unaware of federal laws about retention of presidential documents, especially handling of classified and top-secret national security documents. The Florida Republican also suggested Trump had turned over all the missing documents, which is false. Rubio began by claiming he doesn’t know what’s true because “they” have made...
    Former President Donald Trump took classified documents out of the White House and to his Mar-a-Lago resort - including some labeled 'top secret.'  The Washington Post reported Thursday on the existence of classified material in the trove of documents, which has opened the ex-president up to new legal challenges.  On Wednesday, Congress opened up an investigation into Trump's handling of White House records after he denied a report that he flushed official documents down the toilet and insisted he handed over boxes to the National Archives willingly.    'Also, another fake story, that I flushed papers and documents down a White House toilet, is categorically untrue and simply made up by a reporter in order to get publicity for a mostly fictitious book,' he wrote in a statement Thursday morning. National Archives officials recovered 15 boxes of White House materials from Trump's Mar-a-Lago residence – in apparent contravention of the federal records acts – and reports emerged this month that the former president would often rip official documents and send others to be incinerated at the Pentagon. Trump insisted that the...
    Officials reportedly found classified documents at former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida following his White House exit. Some of the documents were "clearly marked as classified" and included "top secret" material that potentially could rev up legal scrutiny of his handling of White House records, the Washington Post reported. NATIONAL ARCHIVES ASKS DOJ TO REVIEW TRUMP WHITE HOUSE RECORD-KEEPING: REPORT "I have been told I was under no obligation to give this material based on various legal rulings that have been made over the years," Trump said in a statement. "Crooked Hillary Clinton, as an example, deleted and acid-washed 32,000 emails and never gave that to the government. Then, they took large amounts of furniture out of the White House. And Bill Clinton kept numerous audio recordings that the archives wanted, but were unsuccessful at getting after going to court." It is unclear how many classified documents were kept at Mar-a-Lago or how they got there. The National Archives and Records Administration recovered 15 boxes of material from his resort in mid-January. The National...
    Alex Wong, Getty Images Donald Trump took documents designated as classified, including materials that were “top secret” upon leaving the White House, the Washington Post reported in a piece published Thursday. Citing two people familiar with the matter, the Post story adds some detail to a New York Times report published on Wednesday night. That article stated that some of the records the National Archives and Records Administration retrieved from Mar-a-Lago may be classified. This latest development indicates that is the case. The Post said, While it was unclear how many classified documents were among those received by the Archives, some bore markings that the information was extremely sensitive — sometimes colloquially referred to as being “above top secret” — and would be limited to a small group of officials with authority to view such highly classified information, the two people familiar with the matter said. The markings were discovered by the National Archives and Records Administration, which last month arranged for the collection of 15 boxes of documents from Trump’s Mar-a-Lago residence. Archives officials asked the Justice Department to...
    Possible classified material was among the documents recovered from former President TrumpDonald TrumpBillie Eilish meets with Biden at the White House Kemp looks to make masking optional in Georgia schools Biden talks energy and security with Saudi King Salman MORE's Mar-a-Lago club in January, prompting the National Archives and Records Administration to alert the Department of Justice (DOJ), according to a report by The New York Times. An unidentified source told the Times that the possible classified material was discovered when 15 boxes of presidential records were recovered from the Florida resort last month. This discovery reportedly led the National Archives to contact the DOJ in order for its inspector general to look into the matter. Earlier this week, The Washington Post reported that multiple White House record boxes that had been taken to Mar-a-Lago had been recovered by the National Archives in January. Among these documents were communication, gifts and letters from world leaders. Storing the documents at Mar-a-Lago is a possible violation of the Presidential Records Act, which has not been uncommon in other recent presidential administrations. However, a source told the Post...
    Chip Somodevilla, Getty The National Archives and Records Administration believes it has is in its possession classified information in materials obtained from former President Donald Trump, according to a report in the New York Times. The National Archives retrieved records from Trump, who left office with 15 boxes of documents that were supposed to be turned over to the agency. According to one report, “Some Trump White House documents that have been handed over to the House select committee investigating January 6 had to be taped back together by National Archives staff because they had been ripped up, the agency said in a statement.” Details in the Times article are nonexistent. “The National Archives and Records Administration discovered what it believed was classified information in documents Donald J. Trump had taken with him from the White House as he left office, according to a person briefed on the matter,” the publication reported on Wednesday night. The Times article does not say that people at the National Archives believe Trump turned over classified documents. Rather, it says “classified information in documents.”...
    The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has requested the Dept. of Justice investigate Donald Trump’s handling of presidential records after it was forced to travel to Mar-a-Lago, the former president’s Florida home, to retrieve 15 boxes of documents and other items that belong to the federal government. “Archives officials suspected Trump had possibly violated laws concerning the handling of government documents — including those that might be considered classified — and reached out to the Justice Department,” The Washington Post reports, citing people familiar with the matter. Trump, as numerous stories have noted, had a habit of ripping up papers, including important government documents and other items required by law to be retained and handed over to the National Archives. The Post’s sources “said the discussions about the matter remained preliminary, and it was not yet clear whether the Justice Department would investigate. The department also might be interested in merely reclaiming classified materials.” Despite having reclaimed 15 cartons, more is still missing. Trump’s aides reportedly are searching for the items.From Your Site Articles
    (CNN)Over-classification of government secrets both undermines national security by blocking the intelligence community's ability to share critical information and "erodes the basic trust that our citizens have in their government," the US director of national intelligence, Avril Haines, said in a letter to Congress obtained by CNN. The statement from the nation's top spy chief is among the most forceful acknowledgments from a sitting intelligence official of a problem that transparency advocates have warned keeps important information about US government activities hidden from the public -- a debate that in recent years has played out in high-profile court fights over memoirs by former Trump administration officials, most notably former national security adviser John Bolton. "It is my view that deficiencies in the current classification system undermine our national security, as well as critical democratic objectives, by impeding our ability to share information in a timely manner" with allies, Congress and the public, Haines said. Not only does this damage public trust, she wrote, it "reduces the Intelligence Community's capacity to effectively support senior policymaker decision-making."The issue is growing, Haines wrote,...
    Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images President Joe Biden has signed an executive order directing a declassification review of documents relating to the 9/11 investigation. With the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks approaching, 9/11 families have been pushing for the president to declassify relevant documents to “finally plac[e] the values of truth, justice, and accountability before the interests of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.” And until he takes action on that front, the statement co-signed by nearly 1800 Americans said, Biden would not be welcome at memorial events. A month later, the president is ordering a declassification review of relevant documents: When I ran for president, I made a commitment to ensuring transparency regarding the declassification of documents on the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on America. As we approach the 20th anniversary of that tragic day, I am honoring that commitment. Today, I signed an executive order directing the Department of Justice and other relevant agencies to oversee a declassification review of documents related to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s September 11th investigations. The executive order requires the Attorney General to...
    Washington (CNN)A former intelligence analyst and military service member was sentenced in federal court on Tuesday to three years and nine months in prison for leaking national classified defense information to a journalist, the Justice Department announced.Daniel Everette Hale of Nashville, Tennessee, pleaded guilty in March to illegally obtaining classified national defense information and disclosing it to a reporter, who ultimately published the documents, prosecutors said. Neither the journalist nor the news outlet they worked for were identified in court documents.Hale, 33, was accused, in part, of printing 36 documents from his National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency computer in 2014, including 23 unrelated to his duties at the agency, and providing "at least 17 to the reporter and/or the reporter's online news outlet, which published the documents in whole or in part. Eleven of the published documents were classified as Top Secret or Secret and marked as such.""His decision to abuse the trust that had been placed in him is inexcusable, and his disclosure of the documents that he stole risked aiding terrorists planning to attack the United States and state adversaries...
    A female linguist who worked for the Pentagon in Iraq was sentenced to 23 years behind bars for giving classified information to a Hezbollah-tied foreign national. Mariam Taha Thompson was charged in May 2020 in federal court with “transmitting highly sensitive classified national defense information to a foreign national," who she believed would provide the information to Lebanese-based Hezbollah, a foreign terrorist organization tied to Iran. Court records show Thompson signed an extensive statement of facts in late January admitting to the covert plot, and she pleaded guilty in March. Thompson faced a maximum sentence of up to life imprisonment. The Justice Department said Thompson admitted in her guilty plea hearing that "beginning in 2017, she started communicating with her unindicted co-conspirator using a video-chat feature on a secure text and voice messaging application” and that she “developed a romantic interest in her co-conspirator.” Thompson, according to the Justice Department, “learned that the unindicted co-conspirator had a family member who was in the Lebanese Ministry of the Interior, and that the unindicted co-conspirator claimed to have...
    A former contract linguist stationed in Iraq with the Department of Defense (DOD) was sentenced Wednesday for knowingly transmitting classified information to a Lebanese national with ties to a designated terrorist organization. Mariam Taha Thompson, 62, held a top-secret government security clearance prior to her February 2020 arrest and admitted to passing information she believed would be provided to Hezbollah – a terrorist organization backed by Iran. Thompson will serve 23 years in prison. DOD LINGUIST CHARGED WITH GIVING CLASSIFIED INFO TO LEBANESE NATIONAL WITH TIES TO HEZBOLLAH: DOJ "The defendant’s decision to aid a foreign terrorist organization was a betrayal that endangered the lives of the very American men and women on the battlefield who had served beside her for more than a decade," Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia Channing Phillips said Wednesday. "Let today’s sentence serve notice that there are serious consequences for anyone who betrays this country by compromising national defense information." Thompson admitted to starting a romantic relationship in 2017 with her unindicted co-conspirator through a video chat feature on a secure app. The Minnesota...
    Politicians are expressing dire concern about an emerging threat to national security: UFOs, with one lawmaker going as far as to say 'something’s going on that we can’t handle.' Fear was evident from the reaction of some politicians following a highly-classified briefing with the Navy and FBI on Wednesday. The briefing was for members of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, Subcommittee on Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation.  The Pentagon's UAP Task Force is set to deliver its report on UFO sightings to Congress later this month, with some lawmakers pushing for the information to be made public. The Pentagon's Director of National Intelligence is required to turn over a report on U.S. military sightings of UFOs to Congress on June 25. An unclassified version will be made public, while a more detailed classified one will remain secret -- and anticipation has been mounting over what might be revealed.  This week, some lawmakers received a peek at a 'sensitive compartmented information facility,' or SCIF, but wouldn't say what they saw inside. This video grab image obtained April 26, 2020 courtesy...
    The Justice Department dropped a lawsuit against former White House national security adviser John Bolton, ending a legal fight that began last year when the Trump administration accused him of breaching obligations and improperly disclosing classified information in his memoir disparaging former President Donald Trump. A short joint notice was filed in federal court on Wednesday by DOJ officials such as acting Assistant Attorney General Brian Boynton, acting U.S. Attorney Channing Phillips, and Charles Cooper, an attorney for Bolton, which said under federal rules, “the parties stipulate to dismissal of this action, with prejudice, all parties to bear their own fees and costs.” 'DISGRUNTLED BORING FOOL': TRUMP SAYS JOHN BOLTON'S BOOK IS FULL OF 'LIES AND FAKE STORIES' The filing comes exactly one year after the Trump administration sued Bolton and attempted to block the release of his book The Room Where it Happened. In June 2020, the 45th president claimed Bolton's tell-all was a "clear breach of agreements he signed as a condition of his employment and as a condition of gaining access to highly classified information and in...
    A top-secret report from a "respected national laboratory" dated May 25, 2020 during the Trump administration declared a potential COVID-19 lab leak from the Wuhan Institute of Virology plausible and in need of more investigation. The contents of the classified document prepared by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California were the basis for the State Department investigation begun under former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, according to The Wall Street Journal. President Joe Biden ended that investigation and called on U.S. intelligence agencies to deliver a report in 90 days on the origins of the global coronavirus pandemic. The Biden administration report will focus on whether SARS-CoV-2 began with animal to human transmission or a laboratory accident. Sources told the Journal the LLNL study was prepared by the labs intelligence arm, called the "Z Division." The lab is focused on national security, including biological weapons, and "drew on genomic analysis," according to the Journal. Lawrence Livermores spokeswoman declined to comment on the classified report to the Journal. The State Department received the study in October 2020, according to the Journal,...
    The J. Edgar Hoover Building of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is seen on April 03, 2019 in Washington, DC. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images An FBI employee was charged with keeping classified information in her home for years. An FBI official said Kendra Kingsbury, 48, put "her country's sensitive secrets at risk." The information included information about US defense strategies and al-Qaeda.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A federal grand jury indicted a Kansas FBI employee on charges of illegally stashing classified national security documents in her home for more than a decade, according to the Department of Justice.  Kendra Kingsbury, 48, was charged May 18 with two counts of having unauthorized possession of documents relating to the national defense. Kingsbury was arrested and the indictment was unsealed May 21. Kingsbury served as an intelligence analyst for the agency's Kansas City Division for more than 12 years, and held a top secret security clearance, the indictment said. She was suspended in 2017. According to the indictment, she worked with numerous "FBI squads" that concentrated on...
    An FBI intelligence analyst was indicted and arrested after allegedly repeatedly removing national security documents related to human sources and sensitive methods, terrorist groups such as al Qaeda, and a variety of foreign threats and taking the records home over the course of a decade. Kendra Kingsbury, 48, was publicly hit with the allegations Friday after the Tuesday indictment was unsealed, with the former FBI employee being arrested and appearing in front of a magistrate judge Friday. The Justice Department said the Dodge City resident worked as an intelligence analyst for a dozen years at the Kansas City Division of the FBI, where she held a top-secret security clearance, had access to classified information, and was assigned to squads working on counterintelligence, violent crime and gangs, and illegal drug running. The unsealed indictment alleges Kingsbury “improperly removed sensitive government materials — including national defense information and classified documents” from June 2004 to December 2017 and that she “retained these materials in her personal residence.” Investigators did not accuse her of sharing or selling the information. Kingsbury was suspended...
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