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    Three of America's most influential Democratic governors are speaking to potential donors and staff about a 2024 presidential bid, according to a report - but will only run if President Joe Biden doesn't seek re-election. The leaders of California, Illinois and New Jersey are all eyeing the White House, Reuters reported on Friday. And, while California's Gavin Newsom has long been rumored to be interested, the addition of Illinois's J.B. Pritzker and Phil Murphy of New Jersey comes as something more of a surprise. Donald Trump on Thursday night all-but declared he was running, telling a rally in Iowa: 'In order to make our country successful and safe and glorious, I will very, very, very probably do it again. Very, very, very, probably.' Trump is expected to announce a third White House campaign soon after the midterms, The New York Times reported on Friday - possibly as soon as the week of November 14. Trump may well face a challenge from Florida's governor, Ron DeSantis. Gavin Newsom, the governor of California, is widely believed to hold presidential ambitions J.B. Pritzker (left), governor...
    On a warm, moonless spring evening, a secretive male scorpion set out for an evening walk along the floor of one of California’s most desolate playas in search of food, or maybe even love. But while scurrying across the salty clay soil of Soda Lake in San Luis Obispo County, the arachnid bumped into some rare visitors: a pair of Bay Area high school students waving ultraviolet flashlights. As their beams flashed over the predator’s armored flesh, the creature glowed an eerie neon blue. And, just like that, one of California’s most elusive scorpions finally ended its epic game of hide-and-seek. Climate & Environment Mojave Desert tribes aim to turn a sacred mountain into a national monument For centuries, Native Americans have visited Avi Kwa Ame, or Spirit Mountain, to seek religious visions and give thanks for the bounty of the Earth. The scorpion-loving students, Prakrit Jain, 18, of Los Altos, and Harper Forbes, 19, of neighboring Sunnyvale, had been drawn to the rugged Carrizo Plain by a photo of a nameless and unique-looking scorpion posted to the...
    California Governor Gavin Newsom would fare better in a presidential election against Donald Trump than Vice President Kamala Harris, a new poll shows. The recently released Yahoo News/YouGov survey taken June 24-27 shows that in a head-to-head matchup between Harris and Trump, the two tie at 41 percent with another 18 percent saying they don't know for whom they would cast their ballot in that hypothetical 2024 election. But when the former president was put up against Newsom, the California Democrat had just a 1 percentage point advantage – 39 percent to 40 percent. In this case, 21 percent of respondents were unsure how they would vote. When the same two hypothetical races were considered among those who watched the January 6 hearings and those who have not, it was obvious that those following the proceedings are much more likely to go for either Newsom or Harris over Trump.  A recently released poll shows that California Governor Gavin Newsom would fare slightly better against Donald Trump in a presidential election than if Vice President Kamala Harris would take on the...
    BURBANK, Calif. (KABC) -- A new gun store is causing an uproar in Burbank.Some say it's too close to a school, but a protest Saturday didn't stop a long line of customers from showing up for the grand opening.Doors opened to the brand new, second location of a store called Gun World.Across the street, on Magnolia Boulevard and Hollywood Way, dozens of people came out to protest the opening. They say that there are too many gun stores in the city."It's really scary knowing I can go to school and someone can go to my school with a gun," said Ada Kennedy who was protesting the new gun store's grand opening.RELATED | Biden signs most sweeping gun violence bill in decades, says 'lives will be saved'EMBED More News Videos The legislation will toughen background checks for the youngest gun buyers, keep firearms from more domestic violence offenders and help states put in place red flag laws. Kat Fisher says her daughter is terrified to walk past the gun store to Roosevelt Elementary School nearby."For responsible gun owners, if you want...
    SAN FRANCISCO —  San Francisco and the greater Bay Area were pioneers in imposing the nation’s first regional stay-at-home order in early 2020 when the coronavirus first hit. And the region takes pride in the relatively low cumulative death rate throughout the pandemic. But with cases rising and the public eager to move beyond the rules, San Francisco is facing some scrutiny for its decision not going back to indoor mask mandates. Across the bay from San Francisco, officials in Alameda County — which is home to Oakland — issued a new indoor mask mandate last week. And Los Angeles County has outlined criteria that would trigger the same, with officials saying it’s plausible that could happen by the end of the month. But San Francisco and the rest of the Bay Area have thus far held off on reinstating a mask mandate, saying they don’t see the need for it. That has caused consternation among some San Francisco residents, who have begun to regularly voice anger at meetings of the city’s health commission, urging them to reimplement a...
    The upward track of California’s coronavirus case rate may be easing, but contradictory data are muddying the state’s outlook as a new pair of Omicron subvariants seen in South Africa are increasingly making appearances here. The case rate dipped 6% over the past week, from 15,800 new cases a day to 14,900, according to a Times analysis of state data released Tuesday. On a per capita basis, California is recording 266 coronavirus cases a week for every 100,000 residents. A weekly transmission rate of 100 cases or more per 100,000 is considered high. But some health officials are not convinced the decline will stay consistent in the coming weeks. In Santa Clara County, Northern California’s most populous and home to Silicon Valley, the new case rate has fallen 7% in the last week. But wastewater data show that coronavirus levels are actually continuing to rise. “While it looks like it may be plateauing, it actually isn’t,” Dr. Sara Cody, the county’s public health director and health officer, said Tuesday. In looking at wastewater data — an indication of future case...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- For millions of Californians all around the state, 2022 will be the year that forever changes how we deal with waste.On Jan. 1, a new law came into effect that requires all people and businesses to separate things like leftover food and kitchen scraps from the rest of their trash.It's a process called composting.And Robert Reed, who works for waste management company Recology says, it's the biggest change to trash since in decades.RELATED: Sunnyvale residents turning food scraps into eco-friendly productsThe idea behind it is to keep perishable waste out of places like landfills, and instead turn them into a new recycled material that helps offset climate change."It's going to keep millions of tons of materials out of landfills. Reduce methane emissions. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas," Reed said.The new law will roll out gradually and will be implemented at different times over the next two years depending on what city or county you live in.But by 2024, the state will begin imposing fines on those who fail to do it correctly.RELATED: Simple tips to...
    MARIN COUNTY, Calif. (KGO) -- It's the decades-long conflict even our recent surge of storms can't wash away -- How to build the thousands of new housing units we desperately need and at the same time ensure there's enough water for an expanding population."Certainly we recognize the issue that municipalities all around California have got water problems," says John Goodwin with the Association of Bay Area Governments."And those are more acute in some areas, less acute in in others. But again, throughout California, specifically here in the Bay Area, we have a chronic housing problem and housing affordability problem. So there is a tension between the acute water problems and the chronic housing problems," he said.RELATED: Recent Bay Area rain good news for easing droughtWhile the recent storms may bring short term relief, many experts believe a true end to the current drought, could still be a long ways off.Marin County is currently working on plans for a new emergency water pipeline across the Richmond - San Rafael Bridge. While other water agencies point to diminishing groundwater, that could take...
    As the omicron variant drives a winter spike in coronavirus cases that has now topped the summer delta wave in California, local officials and public health experts are looking eastward to New York to predict how the current surge might play out in the Golden State. Their forecast? Cases will continue to rise, and hospitalizations are almost certain to follow, although there continues to be hope that omicron will prove less deadly than earlier variants. And data released Tuesday suggests a new surge in hospitalizations here has already begun. California and New York have similar vaccination rates, and similar pandemic restrictions in place. But while San Francisco logged the first recorded case of omicron in the U.S., cases have exploded faster in New York, giving the West Coast a bit of time to take stock and prepare. According to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the seven-day moving average case rate in New York is 171 per 100,000 residents — a number that has spiked in recent days. In California, it’s much lower at 31, but...
    Californians will ring in the new year with the unfurling of a groundbreaking law that will change how they dispose of their organic waste, particularly leftover food and kitchen scraps. Senate Bill 1383 requires all residents and businesses to separate such “green” waste from other trash, but the program will be rolled out gradually for homes and businesses in the coming months, with the actual startup date varying, depending on the location of your home or business. Fines can be levied for failing to separate organic refuse from other trash. But those charges aren’t scheduled to begin until 2024. CalRecycle, the state agency overseeing the change, has lots of information about the new requirements on its website. Others offering composting solutions include LA Compost — which gives instructions on home composting and also offers community hubs where organic material can be dropped — and CompostableLA, which provides a home pickup service in some neighborhoods, for a fee. Residents and businesspeople should check with their local governments, and with waste haulers, to find out the specific rules for their communities. Here...
    The Bay Area, once a magnet for newcomers, saw the steepest decline of any region in California in the number of people moving to its counties, according to a new report released Wednesday that shows the pandemic has had a dramatic impact on where people are choosing to live. Not only did fewer people migrate into the state, but Bay Area residents are some of the only ones in the entire state continuing to pack up and move — and they now make up an even larger share of those saying goodbye to the Golden State than before the pandemic. Since the start of pandemic in 2020, the California Policy Center report found, the Bay Area has experienced a staggering 45% drop in the number of people coming into the area, with the hardest hit counties being San Francisco (-52.2%), Santa Clara (−51.5%) and San Mateo (−47.6%). In Santa Clara County, for example, roughly 10,000 adults were coming into the county at the start of 2020. This year, that number plummeted to about 4,500. The study did not measure foreign...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Renting an apartment in Southern California is about to get a lot more expensive, with a USC Casden Economics Forecast released today predicting sharp increases in rent across the region, with Orange County renters seeing an average monthly jump of $410 over the next two years."COVID-19 caused a large-scale move from central cities to the suburbs that resulted in a sharp rise in apartment vacancies in Downtown L.A., Koreatown and Beverly Hills and historically low vacancies in Rancho Cucamonga, North City San Diego and Oxnard,'' USC Lusk Center for Real Estate DirectorRichard Green, co-author of the forecast, said in a statement. "While vacancies are coming back down in urban areas, the outskirts remain low and supply and will see rents go up at a much higher rate than the cities.''The forecast predicts that by the end of the third quarter in 2023, rents will increase by $252 over the current level in Los Angeles County, $410 in Orange County, $348 in San Diego County, $310 in Ventura County and $241 in the Inland Empire, including Riverside...
    Corrin Rankin is Black and conservative. She knows she’s a rarity, especially in California. So, when the longtime political operative talks about her decision in 2019 to create the Legacy Republican Alliance, a political action committee designed to recruit Black people to the GOP, she does so with the measured optimism one might expect. “We were like, let’s just start with the basics. First, let’s show people that there are Black people in the room,” Rankin told me from her home in Stockton. “You’ve got to crawl before you can walk.” Or not. On Tuesday, voters will decide whether a Black conservative named Larry Elder will become California’s next governor — an all-but-certain turn of events if Gavin Newsom gets recalled. To go from struggling to find Black Republicans willing to run for minor offices to the possibility of having one lead the executive branch in Sacramento has been, in a word Rankin repeats often, “surprising.” “Win or lose, it has gotten people to talk about what Black conservatism looks like,” said Rankin, vice chair...
    Caitlyn Jenner definitely got everyone’s attention and spilled the news that Jenner has a 19th grandchild is on the way. It happened during the California gubernatorial candidate’s campaign stop in Quincy, California. Jenner told people about the 18 grandchildren so far, joking that 30 would be a nice, even number, TMZ reported in a piece published on Friday. (RELATED: It’s Crazy That Caitlyn Jenner Is The Single Best Messenger In The Republican Party) Jenner then revealed a 19th grandchild is on the way, saying it’s “in the oven.” Shortly after the report came out, the outlet updated its story to reveal the person expecting is Jenner’s son Burt and his wife Valerie. (RELATED: Caitlyn Jenner Officially Files Paperwork To Run For California Governor) Caitlyn Jenner says she’s about to have her 19th grandchild, which means Kylie Jenner COULD be pregnant. https://t.co/t7G6Ltm4Ko — TMZ (@TMZ) August 20, 2021 However, the rumor mill immediately started swirling, with speculations the pregnant Jenner could possibly be Kylie. Fans have noticed the 24-year-old reality didn’t share any photos of herself from her recent birthday celebration,...
    California on Friday unveiled a way the public can access digital copies of their COVID-19 vaccination records. Just don’t call it a passport. Officials say it’s actually a convenience, an easy way to display the same information listed on the physical cards handed out when someone is inoculated. “You are not required to obtain a digital COVID-19 vaccine record. It is an optional means to obtain your COVID-19 vaccine information, and is the digital version of your paper vaccine card,” officials wrote in explaining the new system. “It is one of the options to show proof of vaccination. The state will not be implementing a mandatory passport system in California.” The basics The system is accessible through myvaccinerecord.cdph.ca.gov. Once there, residents will be prompted to provide their name, date of birth, and the email address or cellphone number they used when getting their vaccine. Residents will then create a four-digit personal identification number. If the submitted information matches an official record, the resident will get a text or email with a link to access a...
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines to lift most mask requirements both indoors and out came as a surprise to some despite the plunging number of COVID-19 infections across the country. Under the new guidelines, anyone who is fully vaccinated can participate in indoor and outdoor activities, large or small, without wearing a mask or physical distancing. The changes announced Thursday don’t immediately alter the mask rules in California. But they have raised some questions. Here are some answers: What is the situation in California? California has strict mask rules consistent with the CDC’s previous mask guidance, and officials said they will remain in effect at least for now as they study the new recommendations. The state and Los Angeles County will review the federal recommendations in order to “make sensible adjustments to the orders that are currently in place,” L.A. County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said. The California Division of Occupational Safety and Health’s mask-wearing requirements at businesses — including restaurants and supermarkets — remain in effect. “Because it’s still important to protect workers at...
    California cities could soon set up automated cameras to catch and ticket speeders on their most dangerous streets, if lawmakers pass a bill being introduced Tuesday that is sure to reignite debate over speed cameras in a state where they are effectively banned. Street safety advocates and the bill’s author, Asm. David Chiu, D-San Francisco, say the cameras can help reduce the number of deaths on California’s roads, where more than 1,000 people are killed each year in speed-related crashes. But the technology typically draws a fierce backlash from drivers, who view the cameras as a cash cow for local jurisdictions that want to bust anyone who strays above the speed limit. Civil liberties groups often raise concerns about the cameras’ implications for privacy, creating an unlikely alliance against the technology with rank-and-file police unions who say the more effective way to make roads safer is with traffic stops conducted by officers. Opponents defeated a bill Chiu introduced in 2017 that would have allowed San Jose and San Francisco to launch speed camera programs. Since then, Chiu says, our streets have...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California officials are contemplating what things will look like in the nation's most populous state once millions of people are vaccinated and they move to phase out restrictions on gatherings and businesses that have altered life for a year.When officials last summer designed the four-tiered, yellow-to-purple system California now uses to decide whether people can dine indoors, go to the movies or gather with friends, they did not include a green tier - a recognition that a return to normalcy after the pandemic was far off. Now, Gov. Gavin Newsom's administration is preparing to add one."The likelihood of hitting that green tier is probably sooner than some of us thought when we were looking at the summer and fall," Dr. Mark Ghaly, California's health secretary, said Thursday.State officials rely on a complicated formula, including virus spread, to determine which activities are restricted in each county.But a green designation won't mean "go" for all things. Ghaly said such a label would still mean wearing masks and staying physically distant. He declined in an interview to offer more specifics...
    On Monday, California state Senator Connie Leyva introduced the Silenced No More Act, a bill that advocates say will protect employees who speak out about discrimination at work, even if they’ve signed nondisclosure agreements. “SB 331 will prevent workers from being forced to sign non-disclosure and non-disparagement agreements that would limit their ability to speak out about harassment and discrimination in the workplace,” Leyva said in a statement. “It is unacceptable for any employer to try to silence a worker because he or she was a victim of any type of harassment or discrimination—whether due to race, sexual orientation, religion, age or any other characteristic.” The newly introduced legislation builds on work by Ifeoma Ozoma, a former Pinterest employee who went public in June, alongside her colleague Aerica Shimizu Banks, with allegations of racism and sexism at the company. Ozoma knew she was partially covered by a California law called CCP 1001, which passed in the wake of the Me Too movement to protect employees speaking out about sex discrimination in the office. But she also realized the law had...
    As vice president-elect Kamala Harris resigns from her senate seat today ahead of Wednesday’s inauguration, California’s next senator heads to Capitol Hill during one of the most tumultuous transitions in U.S history. Alex Padilla, until now secretary of state, will fill the spot after being chosen by Gov. Gavin Newsom to serve the rest of Harris’s term. Padilla will become California’s first Latinx senator, and at 47 years old, he has already said he plans to run for a full term in 2022. Here are five things to know about the man set to represent the Golden State in the upper chamber of Congress. 1. Padilla is the son of immigrants  Padilla’s parents immigrated to California from Mexico, ultimately settling in Pacoima in the San Fernando Valley north of downtown Los Angeles. His father worked as a cook while his mother cleaned houses. Padilla, who attended public schools growing up, graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a degree in mechanical engineering before returning to California and taking a job with Hughes Aircraft. A short time later, he made...
    How concerned should California be about the new, potentially more contagious variant of the coronavirus discovered here? The variant caused deep concerns in Europe after it was discovered in England just before Christmas. The first reported U.S. case of COVID-19 caused by the variant was detected in Colorado. Although the development is cause for concern, some say it’s not necessarily cause for alarm. Here is what we know: California New, potentially more contagious coronavirus variant found in California, Newsom says California New, potentially more contagious coronavirus variant found in California, Newsom says Total COVID-19 deaths exceeded 25,000 in California and will likely hit 10,000 in Los Angeles County by Jan. 1 More Coverage Tracking the coronavirus in California Noticias en español Variant is no surprise Experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, say the variant is no surprise, but they also say the new strain could change the way the virus behaves. “I don’t think that Californians should feel that this is something odd,” Fauci said. “This is something that’s expected.” Mutations in...
    By Amir Vera | CNN The United States’ first known case of the new coronavirus variant was discovered in Colorado on Tuesday, according to state health officials. The variant, called B.1.1.7, has been linked to the United Kingdom. The man who was infected is in his 20s, is isolating and appears to have no travel history, according to Gov. Jared Polis. That man had been working at an assisted living facility in Elbert County. Health officials suspect, but have yet to confirm, that another man who worked there also came down with the variant, the county’s public health director said Wednesday. California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday that the new variant has been found in the southern part of his state. Here’s what we know about the variant: The new variant came from the UK The new variant is believed to have originated in southeast England, according to the World Health Organization. Public Health England says backward tracing, using genetic evidence, suggests the variant emerged in September. It then circulated in very low levels until mid-November. But scientists did not...
    VIDEO4:5404:54Hawaiian Airlines announces three new routes: CEOClosing Bell After a bruising year for the airline industry, Hawaiian Airlines CEO Peter Ingram told CNBC he believes it's only up from here. Airlines spent much of 2020 cutting routes and reducing flights due to the decline in travel demand from the coronavirus pandemic, but companies including Delta and United Airlines have announced some new additions in recent months. Hawaiian Airlines is joining the fray with new nonstop flights from Honolulu to Austin, Texas; Orlando, Florida, and Ontario, California, to be added in the spring. The Honolulu-based company anticipates a rebound in air travel in the new year and seeks to capitalize on population trends in the Southern states. "The reason it's the time to announce three new routes is because … we're very optimistic about 2021," he said on "Closing Bell." "These are places we've been looking at for a long time. They have good strong demand for Hawaii." Austin has established itself among the top tech scenes in the country, rivaling the traditional tech ecosystem that the San Francisco Bay Area...
    SACRAMENTO —  California Secretary of State Alex Padilla is an excellent choice for U.S. senator. He’s actually the only choice Gov. Gavin Newsom could have made — intellectually and politically. It was a historic appointment for a governor who takes pride in recording “firsts.” Padilla, 47, will be the first Latino senator from California. And that should be embarrassing for a state with such deep Mexican roots — where the largest ethnic group is now Latino, representing 40% of the population. It’s about time we had a Latino senator. And it’s something Newsom couldn’t ignore. Moreover, Padilla is a loyal political pal of Newsom’s. California Alex Padilla to become California’s first Latino U.S. senator, replacing Kamala Harris California Alex Padilla to become California’s first Latino U.S. senator, replacing Kamala Harris Alex Padilla will be the first Latino to represent California in the U.S. Senate. He will succeed Vice President-elect Kamala Harris. More Coverage Meet Alex Padilla, a rising political star since his 20s Q&A: Padilla discusses his historic appointment The governor...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- As COVID-19 cases soar in California, a new documentary film was released in early December that takes an inside look at the harrowing early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in Wuhan, China.Co-directed by New York-based filmmaker Hao Wu, "76 Days" is a gripping glimpse inside four hospitals at the epicenter during the city's 76-day lockdown.On Friday, Wu talked about his film with ABC7 News anchor Kristen Sze on Midday Live.RELATED: California breaks 3 coronavirus records in 1 day as crisis reaches new peakLike many, Wu says he has been personally touched by the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.The filmmaker was visiting his parents in Shanghai for Chinese New Year celebrations when the Wuhan lockdown began on Jan. 23.RELATED: A timeline of how coronavirus got started"My parents have late stage cancer," Wu says, "I was wondering the whole time I was there whether they would be able to see their grandkids again because we live in New York."Wu's grandfather passed away in March from the virus, and the filmmaker was saddened that he couldn't say goodbye in...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- We're in the middle of the worst coronavirus surge California has seen so far, and the state is making moves to shut back down again. This stay-at-home order is like the one we had in March in spirit, but it's substantially different when it comes to exactly what can and can't be open.The stay-at-home order is admittedly confusing, so we're doing our best to clear it up for you. Keep reading for everything you need to know about the new shutdown rules.Who has to shut down?The state is split into five regions: Northern California, Greater Sacramento, Bay Area, San Joaquin Valley and Southern California. The region has to abide by stay-at-home restrictions once ICU capacity in the region drops below 15%.As of Tuesday, Dec. 8, San Joaquin Valley and Southern California were forced to enter the stay-at-home restrictions. Additionally, five Bay Area counties opted to move ahead of the state's timeline and shut down, as well.MAP: CA counties that can, can't reopen under new rulesFor a better experience, click here to view the full map in...
    A small business owner said Sunday that California's new coronavirus shutdown may force him out of business.  Alex Miladi, the owner of a karate academy in South Yuba City, told "Fox & Friends" his business has already taken a 70% hit as a result of prior California lockdown measures to contain the virus. “This coming lockdown will pretty much put us out [of business],” he said. California Gov. Gavin Newsom/Assemblyman James Gallagher, R-Yuba City. (AP) Alex Adams, the owner of Paragon Bar and Grill in the California town of Northridge, said the prospect of another shutdown was "scary." CALIFORNIA ASSEMBLYMAN JAMES GALLAGHER SLAMS DEMOCRATIC GOV. NEWSOM’S NEW COVID-19 LOCKDOWN He said he just took in $2,500 compared to before Thanksgiving when he took in $11,000. "I can't even pay my kitchen staff with that," he said. They were joined by a California lawmaker who said he is encouraging small business owners to stay open in the face of a new shutdown. CALIFORNIA GOV. NEWSOM WARNS NEW LOCKDOWNS ARE COMING DUE TO UPTICK IN CORONAVIRUS HOSPITALIZATIONS “These businesses have been destroyed for...
    RIVERSIDE (CBSLA) — Some business owners are frustrated about California’s decision to put a daily curfew into place from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. “(I’m) extremely concerned,” said Rex Richey, a restaurant owner. Richey opened The Lobby just seven days before the shutdown in March. In its short life, his Riverside restaurant-bar has been closed, partially opened, moved dining outside, and now faces a new curfew that presents a massive financial challenge. “When we went from inside to outside, the first week saw a $15,000 loss in sales,” Richey said. While some businesses normally close around the curfew time, they say the hour or two they’ll lose could drastically impact their business success because of the customer boost they get during late-night hours. RELATED: Here’s A List Of Things You Still Can Do After the New California Curfew His neighbors at Retro Taco say they have an answer to that and it’s not good: “It’s gonna affect it about 80 percent,” said Shelby Worthington-Loomis of Retro Taco. Some people have begun pushing back against the new curfew guidelines, like a...
    Easy, tiger! G-Eazy’s camp is quite keen that readers don’t jump to the conclusion that a new poem by his ex, Halsey — in which she describes an abusive, lanky, coke-freak boyfriend — is about him. In her anthology, “I Would Leave Me If I Could,” Halsey included the poem “Lighthouse,” in which she wrote a grim account of a relationship with a man who is “7 feet tall” with dark hair and who does lines “for days on end” until he would “pace the room in circles,” at his California home and cry “banging his fist against his forehead” until his knuckles bled. She writes at one point that the subject put his hands around her neck and said, “I’m going to f–king kill you” — and that she “believe[d] him.” Perhaps because G-Eazy, whom she dated from 2017 to 2018, lives in California, has dark hair and stands 6-foot-4 — or perhaps because he has a well-documented history of coke use — there has been some speculation the poem is about him. But when we...
            by Dan McCaleb  An additional 840,000 American workers filed initial unemployment claims in the week ending Oct. 3, down about 9,000 from the previous week’s revised number but still well above pre-pandemic levels. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the advance seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 7.5 percent for the week ending Sept. 26, a decrease of 0.7 percentage points from the prior week. Unemployment rate data lags the new initial claims report by a week. For the second week in a row, new claims from California were estimated by the department. California paused its reporting for two weeks as it works on a backlog of benefits and institutes new fraud prevention measures Continued claims, which count those who have filed for benefits at least two weeks in a row, fell by about a million to 11 million. Part of that drop in continuing claims is a result of workers losing eligibility after 26 weeks of receiving benefits. After calling off stimulus negotiations with Congressional Democrats earlier this week, President Donald Trump said he...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — A newly signed state law makes spreading misinformation about voting by mail a misdemeanor criminal offense. Authored by Sen. Henry Stern, D-Los Angeles, SB 739 took effect immediately after being signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday. “If you’re putting out tweets, Facebook posts or using social and other types of media to intentionally mislead voters about their right and ability to vote by mail, that’s now a crime, and it’s my hope local D.A.s and the state attorney general will go after violators the moment they see them,” Stern said. “In the midst of this worldwide pandemic, it is imperative that voters, especially those who are getting a vote-by-mail ballot for the first time, know their rights and are getting accurate, reliable information.” In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, a record number of California voters are expected to cast their ballots by mail for the Nov. 3 general election. The new law makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally mislead a voter about their right to apply for, receive and return a vote-by-mail ballot. “The...
    TIJUANA – There is more evidence in the case of the firefighter originally from Los Angeles, California, who disappeared in Tijuana on August 20, revealed the Baja California Attorney General’s Office. The Baja California central prosecutor said they are waiting to have contact with the family this Monday, to give them the details of these advances in the investigation that unfortunately have not yet been enough to locate the American firefighter, Francisco Aguilar, who is confirmed is still missing in Tijuana. The prosecution said that the discovery of a criminal cell in Rosarito, who participated in the kidnapping of a farmer in that municipality, on September 4, could be related to the forced disappearance of this firefighter, so they are now investigating whether they could be in connection with those responsible. So they have implemented new scientific strategies such as genetic profiles, bloodstains, and the analysis of objects located outside and inside Aguilar’s residence, to achieve their location. “Advances obtained today, the relatives will be informed first and then the media, it is possible...
    TIJUANA – There is more evidence in the case of the firefighter originally from Los Angeles, California, who disappeared in Tijuana on August 20, revealed the Baja California Attorney General’s Office. The Baja California central prosecutor said they are waiting to have contact with the family this Monday, to give them the details of these advances in the investigation that unfortunately have not yet been enough to locate the American firefighter, Francisco Aguilar, who is confirmed is still missing in Tijuana. The prosecution said that the discovery of a criminal cell in Rosarito, who participated in the kidnapping of a farmer in that municipality, on September 4, could be related to the forced disappearance of this firefighter, so they are now investigating whether they could be in connection with those responsible. So they have implemented new scientific strategies such as genetic profiles, bloodstains, and the analysis of objects located outside and inside Aguilar’s residence, to achieve their location. “Advances obtained today, the relatives will be informed first and then the media, it is possible...
    Some just one in 5 new conditions of coronavirus documented all-around the world came from just 3 U.S. states — Florida, Texas and California, a new NBC Information tally disclosed Tuesday. The 27,574 instances recorded in those people states Monday accounted for 18.9 % of the world wide whole and represented a lot more than a third of the 61,751 new cases claimed in the U.S. Meanwhile, the two-week demise complete in Texas was up 99 percent more than the previous two weeks. In Florida, the two-7 days death whole rose by nearly 84 percent and in California it jumped by almost 27 %. As of Tuesday morning, there were 3,386,164 verified coronavirus conditions in the U.S. and the dying toll was 136,472. Texas’ Hispanic community has been in particular tricky strike of late and Rep. Joaquin Castro, a Democrat whose district includes the metropolis of San Antonio, blamed President Donald Trump and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott for being “gradual to test people, slow to trace the infection and gradual to take care of persons.” Permit our information meet...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Gov. Gavin Newsom unveiled an ambitious coronavirus forecasting model for the state of California during a press conference Thursday.Multiple dashboards were launched on a new state website. Newsom referred to the project as "a model of models."According to the models' "nowcasts," which show real-time COVID-19 trends, Marin and Merced counties are the only two areas where the spread of the virus is listed as "likely increasing rapidly."The state's forecast shows statewide hospitalizations more than tripling over the next month, if current trends continue.COVID-19 RISK CALCULATOR: Quiz yourself on the safest, most dangerous things you can do as California reopensNewsom encouraged Californians to log onto the forecasting site and explore trends where they live.Newsom also gave an update on COVID-19 trends in the state. Hospitalizations have increased 32% over the past 14 days and ICU hospitalizations are up 19%. COVID-19 patients are in 34% of all available ICU beds in the state.Gov. Newsom declared a budget emergency Thursday morning that will allow California to take billions from a reserve account to help plug a large deficit brought...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Gov. Gavin Newsom shared a stunning view of the surging coronavirus cases and hospitalizations in a Wednesday morning press conference.The governor shared the number of new COVID-19 cases in California: from 4,230 on Sunday, to 5,019 on Monday and 7,149 on Tuesday. That's a 69% increase in new cases in just two days.COVID-19 RISK CALCULATOR: Quiz yourself on the safest, most dangerous things you can do as California reopensThat increase isn't just attributable to a rise in testing, the governor said. The positivity rate, or the percentage of those being tested that come back positive for COVID-19, has also gone up from 4.6% a week ago to 5.1%."Each decimal point is profoundly impactfu," Newsom said.READ MORE: Why are COVID-19 cases increasing? It's not just because there's more testingEven more serious is the trend when it comes to hospitalizations. The number of patients hospitalized with the virus has gone up 29% in just two weeks, from 3,177 to 4,095.ICU hospitalizations are also on the rise: 18% in 14 days.Even with that jump, Newsom emphasized hospitals around the...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Gov. Gavin Newsom announced schools, day camps, bars, gyms and professional sports could all reopen with modifications as soon as Friday, June 12. But the initial announcement was very light on details.What rules will these businesses have to follow in order to reopen? As we get closer to the Friday start date, we're learning more about California's guidelines.Note: Not all counties will move forward with reopening bars or gyms that early. For example, Contra Costa County is opening those businesses (and more) on July 1. San Francisco Mayor London Breed says that phase of reopening isn't slated until mid-August for the city.RELATED: Here's everything allowed to open (and what we're still waiting on)Here's what we know so far about what will happen in each sector:SchoolsWhile schools are technically going to be allowed to reopen statewide starting June 12, most won't reconvene until mid-August or early September. That's because districts are taking the summer to implement a long list of new health and safety guidelines released by the Department of Education Monday.The new guidelines include:Keeping students spaced...
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