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    (CNN)In new clarifying guidance announced Wednesday, the Biden administration said that federal law does not allow pharmacies to turn away people who have a prescription for a drug that may end a pregnancy.The US Health and Human Services Department (HHS) Office for Civil Rights sent guidance to more than 60,000 pharmacies around the country to remind the pharmacies that under federal civil rights law, pregnancy discrimination is a form of sex discrimination and that is illegal. Opinion: Its time for Democrats to take a page from the GOP playbook"We are committed to ensuring that everyone can access health care, free of discrimination," said HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra in a news release Wednesday. "This includes access to prescription medications for reproductive health and other types of care."The federal law applies to any pharmacy that receives federal financial assistance, including through Medicare and Medicaid payments. A senior HHS official said Wednesday that its Office for Civil Rights has received a lot of questions and possible complaints in the wake of the US Supreme Court's decision to end a woman's constitutional right to...
    The U.S. Army is reportedly proposing a new policy that would allow soldiers to request a move to a new base if they believe they face discrimination from local or state laws on the basis of gender, sex, religion, race or pregnancy. The move would change an existing policy that allows personnel to seek a move to help them cope with family problems.  In effect, it would allow soldiers to declare certain states to be too racist or homophobic for them to live there. Sources with direct knowledge of the plans said the updated guidance was drafted in response to several state laws - but before a draft of a possible Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v Wade was leaked. They told Military.com that the policy would allow commanders to use 'compassionate reassignment' for cases of discrimination. 'Some states are becoming untenable to live in; there's a rise in hate crimes and rise in LGBT discrimination,' Lindsay Church, executive director of Minority Veterans of America, told the news site.  The Army is reportedly considering a policy change to allow soldiers to...
    by Kendall Tietz   A Wisconsin school district claimed state and federal non-discrimination laws do not apply to white students because they are not part of a protected class, according to the response a student’s parents received after they filed a complaint alleging their child was racially discriminated against. Assistant Superintendent Tanya Fredrich of Elmbrook Schools investigated the complaint and asserted “that the student is not a member of any class that is legally protected from discrimination by state or federal law” in a Nov. 17 statement obtained by the Daily Caller News Foundation. The Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty (WILL) condemned the “outrageous statement” issued by Fredrich that took the “official position … that race discrimination laws do not apply to white students,” in a letter from President & General Counsel Richard M. Esenberg and Deputy Counsel Daniel P. Lennington, addressed to Elmbrook Schools and its superintendent of Schools, Mark Hansen. “Not only is this both legally and factually wrong, but it is frankly shocking that a public educational institution could hold such a view,” WILL added in...
    A Wisconsin school district official is facing backlash for saying that a white student was not entitled to protection under anti-discrimination law. Tanya Fredrich, the assistant superintendent of Milwaukee-area Elmbrook Schools, rejected a claim last year from a white student's parents that their child had faced discrimination on account of his race. The assistant superintendent justified the rejection by claiming that the student did not belong to a class protected by anti-discrimination law. "The student is not a member of any class that is legally protected from discrimination by state or federal law," Fredrich said in a statement to a news outlet. The child's parents had claimed that the district was neglecting the necessary mental health assistance needed by their child and was deliberately prioritizing nonwhite students and students from low-income families. COLLEGE NEWSPAPER YANKS ARTICLE FOR HAVING TOO MANY QUOTES FROM WHITE STUDENTS "The student’s race, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status are what are considered to be the majority status and thus do not form a basis for claiming that the student is being treated...
    Eakgrunge | Istock | Getty Images Ageism is one of the most unfair paradoxes in the labor market: People put in decades of hard work and then find themselves penalized for having done so. And the problem is only worsening: Nearly 80% of older workers say they've seen or experienced age discrimination in the workplace, according to the most recent survey by AARP. That was the highest share since the group began asking the question in 2003. Even as the economy bounces back from the fallout of the coronavirus pandemic, older workers are having a challenging time getting re-hired. The percentage of jobseekers in February above the age of 55 who were "long-term unemployed," meaning they'd been looking for a job for 27 weeks or more, was more than 36%, compared to around 23% among those between the ages of 16 and 54. (Around a quarter of the workforce is older than 55.)More from Fixed Income Strategies:Here's a look at more stories for investors who are retired or are approaching retirement and are interested in a range of tools and...
    Dallas Cowboys team owner Jerry Jones was on hand for Senior Bowl practices on Wednesday and was asked about Brian Flores’ lawsuit alleging racial discrimination against the NFL and three teams. Jones admitted he, the league and other owners could do better in terms of improving the number of diverse hirings. Only one team has a Black head coach – the Pittsburgh Steelers’ Mike Tomlin. Other minority head coaches include Washington Commanders’ Ron Rivera and New York Jets’ Robert Saleh. There have been no minority head coaches hired so far this cycle. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM "I can see it’s an area, one of many, that we can do better. The area has some good attention. This is obvious if you look through that the league and coaches are trying to improve there," Jones told reporters, via USA Today. Flores filed a lawsuit against the NFL, New York Giants, Miami Dolphins and Denver Broncos, bringing a bevy of allegations to the forefront as he seeks class-action status. Flores claimed to have taken part in "sham" interviews...
    Animal rights activists and dog-lovers alike are celebrating a huge win out of New York: New legislation prevents insurance companies from discriminating against dog breeds. The law came after a several-year push calling for the end of breed discrimination in New York housing. According to Syracuse News, Gov. Kathy Hochul signed Senate Bill 4254 on October 30, 2021. The bill went into effect this January, and “prohibits insurers from refusing to issue or renew, cancel, or charge or impose an increased premium for certain policies based solely on the breed of dog owned.” Previously, insurance companies would refuse to service or would add increased fees to owners of breeds labeled as “aggressive,” such as pit bulls, German shepherds, and Doberman pinschers. The issue not only made housing for dog owners challenging to find but also discouraged pet owners from adopting those breeds – breeds that are often found in shelters with high rates of euthanasia. Libby Post with NYS Animal Protection Federation told Syracuse News, “It’s not fair to the animals and not fair to the homeowners who want...
    A black job applicant is suing his employer after its San Diego office told him he had to cut his dreadlocks in order to get the gig, but the company is now saying it's a 'miscommunication.'  Jeffrey Thornton filed a lawsuit on Monday against his employer, event company Encore Group, after its San Diego office denied him employment unless he cut his hair.  Thornton has worked for the company as a technician since 2016 in its Florida office, but decided to move to the San Diego office after being furloughed in 2020 and hearing the California office was hiring more positions.  He interviewed for a technical supervisor position on November 1, where the hiring manager informed him his hair had to change in order to be officially offered the role. 'I was told I was being recommended by my East Coast references and that I should find the transition to be no problem,' he said at a press conference on November 30 from inside a barbershop.  'All that was left was to discuss the dress code. I expected to have...
    (CNN)Young adults who experience discrimination about their bodies, race, age or sex have a greater risk of dealing with mental health problems than those who do not, a new study has found. Encountering discrimination -- especially racism -- has long been associated with negative effects on overall well-being, such as higher levels of stress, poor cognitive function, anxiety, depression and substance use, previous studies have found.Those who faced discrimination frequently -- at least a few times per month -- were around 25% more likely to be diagnosed with a mental disorder and twice as likely to develop severe psychological distress than people who didn't experience discrimination or did less often, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. Having dealt with any degree of discrimination was linked with a 26% higher risk for having poor overall health, according to the participants' responses. Often experiencing discrimination wasn't strongly associated with binge drinking but was linked with more use of drugs such as amphetamines, marijuana, tranquilizers, barbiturates or cocaine in the last year without a doctor's prescription. Racial discrimination may...
    MORE than half of Americans have encountered some form of discrimination against people with disabilities, according to new research. A new survey reveals that out of 2,000 respondents, only 43 percent said they’ve never witnessed any examples of a disabled person being discriminated against. 3Over 56 percent of Americans have witnessed discrimination against someone with a disabilityCredit: Getty 3Not many people are involved in efforts to make things easier for disabled peopleCredit: Getty Meanwhile, 56 percent said they’ve seen discrimination taking place, most frequently at restaurants (30 percent), malls or stores (27 percent), and public transport (24 percent). But despite these sobering numbers, most Americans think the country is becoming more inclusive towards people with disabilities. The survey was conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Morgan’s Inclusion Initiative, a 501 c3 nonprofit dedicated to creating places for people of all abilities. Results found that only 28 percent of respondents are involved with a local disability advocacy group in their community – and out of those who aren’t, 24 percent cited a lack of personal connection to the issue. When there is...
    With a swipe of the pen and single media appearance, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott managed to lay violent crime at the feet of parents, avoid any actual action to reduce crime, and impose a discriminatory law under the guise of making the state safer. “We need better parenting,” Abbott said at the Texas Pastor Council's Safer Houston Summit on Monday. He signed the Damon Allen Act into law the same day. “We need to restore God in our communities,” the governor said in a victory speech regarding the much-protested legislation. “If we do that, we will be able to reduce crime in this region.”  I’m not sure which bible Abbott uses, but nothing in mine recommends keeping poor people in jail while letting the rich out on bail, which the Damon Allen Act further promotes.   xGov. Greg Abbott (R-TX) speaks before signing bail bill requiring people accused of violent crimes to put up cash to get out of jail:“We need better parenting … We need to restore God in our communities. If we do that, we will be able to reduce crime in this...
    GARFIELD PARK — It started when Jett Hawkins’ West Side school ordered him to take out his braids. His mother fought back to defend traditionally Black hairstyles. Five months later, the state has outlawed hair discrimination, protecting the freedom of Illinois students to wear braids, locs and similar looks in school. Gov. JB Pritzker signed the Jett Hawkins’ Law on Friday. It goes into effect Jan. 1, 2022. The law will call on the Illinois State Board of Education to complete a review of school handbooks and policies to ensure they don’t single out and ban Black hairstyles like cornrows, locs and braids. Schools that don’t comply will face funding cuts and may lose their recognition with ISBE. The law also directs the state board to produce educational resources for schools about hair discrimination, and the histories behind protective hairstyles Black people often use. School handbooks and policies that restrict certain hairstyles are often rooted in white supremacy, advocates said, and often single-out traditionally Black hairstyles. “For so many people, how you dress and how you look is an expression...
    When the Senate takes up the Equality Act, it will be reckoning with one of America’s bedrock values: Whether or not every American deserves to be treated equally under the law. The historic legislation, which passed in the House in March, would modernize and improve our nation’s civil rights laws by including explicit, permanent protections for LGBTQ people, as well as women, people of color, ethnic minorities, and people of all faiths. Currently, 29 states do not have laws that explicitly protect LGBTQ people from discrimination. The patchwork of local laws means that LGBTQ Americans like myself remain vulnerable to being evicted from our homes, kicked out of businesses open to the public, or denied health care or government services in most states—simply because of who we are. As a Black trans man living in a rural area in Menomonie, Wisconsin, my own story is proof of why the Equality Act is terribly needed. Being Black and being trans means that I face intersectional marginalization in all areas of my life. I worry about my personal safety. And as...
    'If you are a religiously affiliated entity and you are providing housing, you can say we're an evangelical college and we will only allow evangelicals to live in our dorm, but that doesn't give you a free pass to discriminate,' said an attorney with Lambda Legal. A federal judge has ruled against College of the Ozarks, refusing to block a memorandum issued by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development enforcing fair housing rules for transgender students. U.S. District Judge Roseann Ketchmark told the Christian conservative college in Point Lookout, Missouri, on May 19 that if it doesn't adhere to the instructions in the HUD memo enforcing the understanding of the Fair Housing Act contained in an executive order issued by President Joe Biden, it would be liable to lawsuits filed by people who feel they have been discriminated against by the school, according to the Springfield News-Leader. Ketchmark said she made the ruling "after careful consideration of the law." On his first day in office, Biden issued an...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) –  Amid a surge in reported attacks and discrimination against Asian Americans, community leaders are encouraging Minnesotans to help combat these incidents by listening to people’s stories, learning about the historical context and reporting hate incidents. This comes in wake the Atlanta spa shootings that killed eight people, including six Asian women. A suspect has been arrested and charged with eight counts of murder and authorities in Georgia are not ruling out tacking on hate crime charges. READ MORE: First Of Its Kind Mental Health Facility Opens At M Health Southdale Next Week On Wednesday, more than 1,000 people participated in an online event “Unheard Stories: Asian Americans Experiencing Hate” to hear from victims and discuss ways to take action against violence and discrimination. “We have to work at all these levels right at the legislative level, at the community level and also at the media level around narratives,” said Chanida Phaengdara Potter, with the Southeast Asian Diaspora, or “SEAD,” Project, which is an organization that’s part of the coalition Asian Minnesotan Alliance for Justice hosting the event. “We are trying to...
    Hi there, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories:Personal FinanceNFL cribs: Here’s where the Kansas City Chiefs call home Five decades after their last appearance in the Super Bowl, the Kansas City Chiefs are back. Fueled by thrilling 24-year-old quarterback Patrick Mahomes, the team has reinvigorated its long-suffering fan base.When can younger, healthy people get vaccinated? A former Biden COVID-19 adviser says it will be months Some 41.4 million vaccine doses had been distributed to states as of Sunday morning, and 21.8 million doses had been administered. Shopping for a home and scared of COVID-19? Here’s how real-estate agents are keeping clients safe ‘Whenever I see a new place, I have to sign forms about COVID-19, such as if I have traveled anywhere, tested positive recently or know anyone who has.’CDC Director Walensky: ‘I can’t tell you how much vaccine we have’ President Biden has outlined a goal of 100 million vaccinations in 100 days, which some analysts describe as ambitious.‘I’m tired of being the only one with moral values’: My mother put me on the deed of her home. Now...
    The Trump administration's latest effort comes at the '11th hour,' one expert says, but may still be hard to undo later on. In its final days, the Trump administration is continuing its push to gut protections for marginalized groups. Over the course of a month, it has moved forward with four rules that would make life harder for LGBTQ people, asylum seekers, and people of color. Its latest salvo against civil rights came from the Justice Department, according to a Wednesday report from the New York Times, which had access to a draft document of the regulation. The rule would affect discrimination based on race, color, or national origin from organizations receiving federal funding, but it could also affect other groups that face discrimination, including LGBTQ people.
    (CNN)The US Justice Department has asked the White House for approval on a change to how it enforces a major federal law, which would undo some key civil rights protections for minority groups, The New York Times reported Tuesday. If approved, the request to change how the department enforces Title VI of the Civil Rights Act -- which was submitted to the White House Office of Management and Budget last month -- would keep protections in place in intentional discrimination cases but not instances where a "disparate impact" was felt by minority groups, the Times reported. In a draft proposal obtained by the newspaper, the department specifically said its current enforcement of Title VI included a "vastly broader scope of conduct" than the statute actually allows for. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act "prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin in programs and activities receiving Federal financial assistance." According to the newspaper, the request from the Justice Department would mark the first considerable change to how it defines discrimination in Title VI in decades. Even...
    Joe Biden promised the LGBTQ community he would fight for them. Here's what they want. As a presidential candidate, Joe Biden vowed to work toward LGBTQ equality. At an ABC News town hall in October, he told the mother of a transgender girl that there should be "zero discrimination" against transgender people and that he would take action to reverse many of Donald Trump's anti-LGBTQ policies. Only a few days before the election, Biden said he would make the Equality Act, which would prohibit a number of forms of discrimination against LGBTQ people, a legislative priority in his first 100 days in office. In an interview with Philadelphia Gay News, he also said he supported the passage of the LGBTQ Essential Data Act and Jabara-Heyer NO HATE Act, which LGBTQ groups have also championed. He was also the first president-elect to thank transgender voters in an acceptance speech and has assembled a transition team that includes several LGBTQ staffers who could influence his agenda as president.
    U.S. District Judge Michael Watson ruled Wednesday that Ohio’s refusal to allow transgender residents to change the gender on their birth certificate is unconstitutional. “This Policy resembles the sort of discrimination-based legislation struck down under the equal protection clause in Romer v. Evans as nothing more than a policy ‘born of animosity toward the class of person affected’ that has ‘no rational relation to a legitimate government purpose,'” Watson wrote in reference to a 1996 gay rights case that found a Colorado amendment banning protection from discrimination based on sexual orientation was unconstitutional. Three transgender women and one man sued Ohio over two years ago, arguing that the state’s ban on changing gender on a birth certificate was a violation of the 14th Amendment and exposed them to workplace discrimination and violence. One of the defendants, Stacie Ray, testified that when she began her new job, a human resource professional questioned why the gender on her birth certificate and driver’s license did not match in front of ten to fifteen colleagues, according to the order. Ray then said she was harassed by...
    Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel plans to appeal a Monday court ruling that found Michigan’s civil rights laws do not protect against discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. "We intend to submit that all Michigan residents are entitled to protection under the law – regardless of their gender identity or sexual orientation – in our appeal to this decision,” said Nessel. Judge Christopher Murray ruled on Monday that Elliot-Larsen Civil Rights Act (ELCRA), which bans discrimination on the basis of sex, did not ban discrimination against sexual orientation. According to the ELCRA, discrimination on the basis of “religion, race, color, national origin, age, sex, height, weight, familial status, or marital status” is illegal. The decision came after two Michigan companies argued that laws in the state did not prevent them from refusing service to customers who are a part of the LGBTQ+ community. Nessel stated that she planned to appeal the decision to the Court of Appeals and possibly even to the Michigan Supreme Court if the Court of Appeals rules similarly. Nessel is the first openly LGBTQ person to be elected to a statewide office in...
    SAN ANTONIO – Editor’s note: This content was created exclusively for KSAT Explains, a weekly streaming show that dives deep into the biggest issues facing San Antonio and South Texas. Watch past episodes here and download the free KSAT-TV app to stay up on the latest. The city of San Antonio was one of three places in Texas to declare racism a public health crisis this summer. KSAT brought together three San Antonio residents, Glo Armmer, Pharaoh Clark and Josey Garcia, to discuss their experiences with racism and how they hope the city can tackle racism and inequalities. You can watch the entire conversation in the player below. Copyright 2020 by KSAT - All rights reserved.
    (CNN)A Texas teenager, who was punished over the length of his dreadlocks, won't have to cut his hair to return to school after a federal court blocked the district from enforcing its hair-length policy against him.US District Court Judge George C. Hanks, Jr. issued a preliminary injunction this week that requires the Barbers Hill Independent School District in Mont Belvieu, Texas, to allow Kaden Bradford to attend school and participate in extracurricular activities without cutting his hair.Bradford, who is returning to Barbers Hill High School for his junior year, has been wearing his hair in locs since the seventh grade and hasn't cut it since then because the locs would unravel. Black students say they are being penalized for their hair, and experts say every student is worse off because of it"Locs is a natural Black hair formation and I am an African American," he told CNN. "Also to piggyback off of that I've grown up around the Trinidadian culture and locs is a very important part in that culture as well."He wore his locs up in a hairband to...
    Jamie Grill/Getty Images Racism could be harming the brain health of Black women, a new study found.  Black women who reported higher rates of everyday racial discrimination were 2.75 times more likely to suffer poor subjective cognitive functioning. Poor subjective cognitive functioning impacts memory, which can affect taking medication and going to doctor's appointments.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The constant stress of everyday racism in the US — both systemic and interpersonal — is known to be linked to worse health outcomes for Black people from higher infant mortality rates to a shorter life expectancy.  According to a new study published Tuesday, it also could have a direct impact on the cognitive health of Black women.  Researchers at the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University analyzed data from 59,000 Black women aged 21 through 69 years collected in the Black Women's Health Study.  They found Black women in particular who experience racism daily — from microaggressions to systemic discrimination — were 2.75 times more likely to suffer a condition known as poor subjective cognitive functioning...
    COVID-19-related discrimination has dropped from its peak in April but still persists for Asian, Black and Latino Americans, new research suggests — and experts say there are steps anyone can take to help eradicate it. Asian Americans in early June were more than twice as likely as white Americans (13% versus 5%) to report having recently experienced COVID-19-associated discrimination, according to results from the ongoing Understanding Coronavirus in America Study conducted by USC Dornsife’s Center for Economic and Social Research (CESR). Black (9%) and Latino Americans (9%) were nearly twice as likely as white people to report this experience. The survey measured perceived COVID-19-associated discrimination by whether respondents said they had been treated with less respect and courtesy than others, experienced people acting afraid of them, were harassed or threatened, or received poorer service at stores or restaurants due to “people thinking they might have the coronavirus.” “This discrimination that’s associated with COVID-19 is real, and it’s serious,” Ying Liu, a research scientist at CESR, told MarketWatch. “Though it seems like the trend is trending downward a little bit,...
    James O’Keefe’s team of undercover journalists Project Veritas have released hidden camera footage of Facebook employees admitting to deliberate political bias, censorship of Trump supporters, as well as discrimination against conservative and white male employees. A Facebook insider, Ryan Hartwig, has also come forward to Project Veritas to give his account of bias and discrimination at the company. The hidden camera footage reveals a host of Facebook employees and contractors admitting to political bias. Steve Grimmett, team lead for content review at Facebook can be heard admitting that he lumps the MAGA movement in with “Nazis” and “Hitler.” Grimmett can be heard telling an undercover reporter that he monitors “hate organizations” including “Hitler, Nazis, MAGA, you know, proud boys, all that stuff all day long.” “We rig the game so it can work on the left side” admits another Facebook employee, who agrees that the company “100%” favors the left. A content moderator at Cognizant, a firm that handles content moderation for Facebook, can also be heard saying she would accept a $81 million bounty placed on President Trump’s head...
    (CNN)For LGBTQ Americans, this is a watershed moment -- one that's decades overdue, and one that rivals the legalization of same-sex marriage in terms of what it means for our lives. LGBTQ people no longer can be fired simply because of who we are. John D. SutterThe US Supreme Court on Monday ruled that civil rights law protects us from that. The court, in a 6-3 opinion, recognized that the 1964 Civil Rights Act's protections against discrimination based on "sex" also apply to gay and transgender people."An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex," the court's majority said in an opinion authored by Neil Gorsuch. "Sex plays a necessary and undisguisable role in the decision, exactly what Title VII [of that act] forbids." It's surprising that it's taken this long -- I hope you're surprised by that. Until this week in the United States of America, many LGBTQ workers lacked these simple legal protections. Read MoreIn over half the...
    (CNN)Former President Jimmy Carter said Wednesday that "silence can be as deadly as violence," and called on Americans in positions of "power, privilege, and moral conscience" to fight racial discrimination in his first public reaction to the nationwide unrest surrounding the police killing of George Floyd. "People of power, privilege, and moral conscience must stand up and say 'no more' to a racially discriminatory police and justice system, immoral economic disparities between whites and blacks, and government actions that undermine our unified democracy. We are responsible for creating a world of peace and equality for ourselves and future generations," he said."We need a government as good as its people, and we are better than this."Carter, a Democrat, said in the statement that he and former first lady Rosalynn Carter "have seen that silence can be as deadly as violence" since leaving the White House in 1981, and are now "pained by the tragic racial injustices and consequent backlash across our nation in recent weeks."READ: Former President Jimmy Carters statement on the death of George Floyd"Our hearts are with the victims'...
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