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    (CNN)"This is probably bad ... for former President Trump."With dry understatement, Illinois Rep. Adam Kinzinger, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the insurrection, summed up on CNN on Wednesday a significant turn in the Department of Justice probe into the mob attack on the US Capitol and the effort to overturn the 2020 election.News of grand jury subpoenas for former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and former deputy counsel Patrick Philbin, the latter of which was first reported by CNN, is the latest sign that department investigators are reaching inside Trump's inner circle during his final days in the White House. FIRST ON CNN: Former Deputy White House counsel subpoenaed in January 6 probeThese developments, which are the clearest indication yet that Trump is in the investigation's sights, suggest the effort to find the truth will survive even if Republicans win the House this fall and shut down the select committee. Unlike the House investigation, the Justice Department would be able to bring criminal charges against former Trump administration officials if it chooses.It follows that the...
    (CNN)The Justice Department on Friday articulated for the first time publicly that former close advisers to ex-Presidents may be immune from congressional testimony -- though that doesn't mean Donald Trump's West Wing staff can avoid the House's subpoenas related to January 6, 2021. The DOJ position means that Mark Meadows and other top Trump White House officials might not be protected from civil litigation to force them to testify on Capitol Hill now that Trump is out of office and the House select committee bears down seeking information. The department revealed its position in a court filing Friday in the lawsuit brought by Trump's White House chief of staff Mark Meadows challenging House select committee's subpoenas. "The Select Committee has set forth in detail the information it seeks from Plaintiff (Meadows), and the importance of that evidence to the Select Committee's work," Justice Department lawyers wrote. "The Select Committee has demonstrated that such information is critical to its investigation." While in office, Trump and his White House routinely cited an "absolute immunity" that would excuse them from showing up when...
    Jeffrey Clark next to acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, Oct. 21, 2020. On Wednesday, the FBI handed subpoenas to an unknown number of people who took part in the Jan. 6 conspiracy as false electors. Subpoenas are reported to have gone out to members of the Republican Party in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, New Mexico, and Nevada. In addition, federal agents seized evidence, including the phone of the Republican Party chair in Nevada.  Finally, rightwing “think tank” The Center for Renewing America confirmed that “more than a dozen DOJ law enforcement officials” searched the home of former Justice Department (DOJ) official Jeffrey Clark on Wednesday. Clark’s part in the Jan. 6 conspiracy was supplemental to the role of the false electors, whose assigned task was to create an excuse for throwing out the electoral votes in seven states, as part of the scheme created by Donald Trump and attorney John Eastman. Clark, an environmental lawyer several levels down at the DOJ at the time, proposed that Trump remove then-acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and replace him with the completely unqualified Clark. Clark then promised to throw the weight of...
    Mike Pence's notes on Jan. 6 The Justice Department has issued subpoenas across multiple states to Republican politicians involved in the scheme to use fake electors as a means of disrupting the outcome of the election. Included in the subpoenas are a number of people who signed certificates claiming to be “duly elected and qualified electors.” Since these certificates surfaced, it has seemed clear they were direct physical evidence of a conspiracy to subvert democracy, and now it seems the FBI agrees. As Brandi Buchman reported, on Tuesday the House select committee gave their first public hearing on this aspect of Trump’s attempt to destroy the electoral process. The FBI appears to be following closely on the committee’s heels, issuing a series of grand jury subpoenas that show the Justice Department is investigating these false electors for potential crimes. As The Washington Post reports, agents involved in delivering the subpoenas described them as “court-authorized law enforcement activity.” This represents a significant expansion of Justice Department activity related to Jan. 6 and points to the possibility of wide-ranging charges of seditious conspiracy against...
    By Zachary Cohen, Sara Murray, Katelyn Polantz, Evan Perez and Marshall Cohen | CNN Federal investigators subpoenaed the Georgia Republican Party chairman for information related to the fake elector scheme there — as the Justice Department has issued a fresh round of subpoenas to people from several states who acted as rogue electors after the 2020 presidential election, multiple sources familiar with the situation told CNN. The subpoena for the chairman, David Shafer, represents a significant step because he played a central role in organizing the fake slate of electors from Georgia and coordinated the effort with the Trump campaign. The focus on Shafer also comes as sources tell CNN the Justice Department subpoenaed Trump electors this week in Georgia, Michigan and Pennsylvania — all states that former President Donald Trump lost. The Justice Department has been scrutinizing the Trump campaign’s use of so-called alternate electors. The new round of subpoenas represents an escalation of a criminal probe that, before now, had approached lower-level Republicans. All along, however, federal investigators have pursued information about political figures higher up, including at...
    (CNN)Federal investigators subpoenaed the Georgia Republican Party chairman for information related to the fake elector scheme there -- as the Justice Department has issued a fresh round of subpoenas to people from several states who acted as rogue electors after the 2020 presidential election, multiple sources familiar with the situation told CNN.The subpoena for the chairman, David Shafer, represents a significant step because he played a central role in organizing the fake slate of electors from Georgia and coordinated the effort with the Trump campaign.This story is breaking and will be updated.
    Federal agents issued a fresh batch of subpoenas Wednesday against political activists who supported former President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn election results in at least two states, according to a new report. Agents "conducted court authorized law enforcement" at the home of Brad Carver, a Georgia lawyer, and Thomas Lane, who helped the Trump campaign, the Washington Post reported on Wednesday, citing FBI officials. This indicates the inquiry is examining the use of alternative electors during the aftermath of the election, according to the outlet. FEDERAL PROSECUTORS ACCUSE JAN. 6 COMMITTEE OF HINDERING CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS Carver allegedly put his signature on a document falsely purporting to be an elector for Trump, and Lane worked on behalf of Trump campaign efforts to overturn election results in Arizona and New Mexico, according to the report. A number of political activists and local officials produced documents falsely claiming to be electors in the event that legal challenges deemed Trump the elector winner. The exact reason for the subpoenas of Carver and Lane was not immediately clear. During...
    Drew Angerer/Getty Images The Department of Justice will not prosecute former White House Chief-of-Staff Mark Meadows and Deputy Chief-of-Staff for Communications Dan Scavino, the New York Times reported on Friday night. The two were subpoenaed by the House Jan. 6 Committee investigating the Capitol riot. Meadows initially cooperated with the panel and handed over a trove of communications, but has since stopped assisting in the probe. Scavino negotiated with the panel via his lawyers before ultimately refusing to cooperate. The House of Representatives had referred the Meadows and Scavino cases to the DOJ to urge that criminal charges be brought against them. The Times cited a letter from the U.S. Attorney’s office in Washington, D.C. to the House general counsel on Friday: “Based on the individual facts and circumstances of their alleged contempt, my office will not be initiating prosecutions for criminal contempt as requested in the referral against Messrs. Meadows and Scavino,” Matthew M. Graves, the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, wrote to Douglas N. Letter, the general counsel of the House, on Friday. “My office’s review...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court on Tuesday denied an emergency request from three Texas state legislators seeking to quash subpoenas from the US Justice Department and voting rights groups related to a challenge to state legislative maps.There were no noted dissents to the Supreme Court order.The state's attorney general had argued the legislators are immune from such requests for testimony, arguing that the depositions will "probe the very innerworkings of the legislative process, examining the legislators' thoughts, impressions, and motivations in their legislative acts." Exclusive: Supreme Court leak investigation heats up as clerks are asked for phone records in unprecedented moveThe case relates to lawsuits filed by the Department of Justice and voting rights groups alleging that Texas's 2021 congressional and statehouse redistricting plans -- based on the 2020 census -- violated Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act.The provision of law prohibits states from adopting voting rules that result in the "denial or abridgement" of the right to vote on account of "race or color." The challengers served subpoenas to the legislators -- Ryan Guillen, Brooks Landgraf and John Lujan...
    The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol will vote Wednesday night on whether to censure Jeffrey Clark, a move that would tee up a full House vote on whether to refer the former Justice Department official for prosecution by the very agency where he used to work. Clark was a mid-level attorney at DOJ during the Trump administration, but he became a central figure in a pressure campaign by former President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer defense secretary Esper sues Pentagon in memoir dispute Biden celebrates start of Hanukkah Fauci says lies, threats are 'noise' MORE to involve the Justice Department in investigating his baseless claims of voter fraud. The Jan. 3 committee sought to speak to Clark about that effort, including his suggestion that DOJ send letters to several states encouraging them to delay certification of their election results. The vote comes after Clark only briefly appeared for a deposition with the committee earlier this month. Rep. Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonJan. 6 panel faces double-edged sword with Alex Jones, Roger Stone Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Proud Boys, Oath...
    House select January 6th Committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson said Thursday his panel is preparing to send out a score of subpoenas as it continues its probe of the Capitol riot. As a new round of subpoenas loomed, Jeffrey Clark, a former assistant attorney general, was set to testify behind closed doors on Friday, after getting a subpoena last month. He arrived at the Capitol complex Friday morning.  Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, wouldn't say who would be receiving the demands for documents and testimony – as the panel plows through witness interviews, and prepares to battle one potential witness in court. 'Some of the people have been written about. Some of the people haven't been written about,' Thompson told CNN.  Clark is among the Trump loyalists elevated at key agencies in the final months of the Trump administration. Clark helped spark threats of mass resignations of top DOJ officials when he said President Trump planned to fire acting AG Jeffrey Rosen and install himself.  The committee subpoena letter referenced his role in a pressure campaign targeting state election officials where Trump...
    President BidenJoe Biden White House: US has donated 200 million COVID-19 vaccines around the world Police recommend charges against four over Sinema bathroom protest K Street revenues boom MORE on Thursday said his past comments that the Justice Department should prosecute people who defy congressional subpoenas were not appropriate. “The way I said it was not appropriate,” Biden said on Thursday during a CNN town hall. “I should have chosen my words more wisely.” The president was asked last week what his message was to people who defy subpoenas from the committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. “I hope that the committee goes after them and holds them accountable criminally,” he said. “I do, yes,” he added when asked if they should be prosecuted by the Justice Department.  The House earlier on Thursday voted to hold former Trump White House strategist Steve BannonStephen (Steve) Kevin BannonMeadows hires former deputy AG to represent him in Jan. 6 probe: report House GOP leaders urge 'no' vote on Bannon contempt Trump calls Liz Cheney a 'smug fool' MORE in contempt...
    White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki on Monday said there was 'hardly a comparison' between President Joe Biden and the Trump administration as she batted down a question about the president's comment that people who defy Jan. 6th committee subpoenas should be prosecuted. Psaki was pressed on Biden's comment  Friday evening, when he first said he hopes a select House committee 'goes after them and holds them accountable.' He then got asked if those who defy subpoenas should be prosecuted, and responded: 'I do, yes.' Psaki on Friday night vouched for the 'independent role' of the DOJ – which Biden has pledged to uphold.  But she was asked about the comments point blank on Monday at the White House. 'The president continues to believe that Jan. 6 was one of the darkest days in our democracy,' Psaki said, focusing on the riot that resulted in the immediate deaths of five people. 'He also continues to believe that the Department of Justice has the purview and the independence to make decisions about prosecutions,' she said. White House press secretary Jen Psaki...
    Fox News reporter Peter Doocy pressed White House press secretary Jen Psaki on whether President Joe Biden believes the Justice Department (DOJ) should prosecute Americans who defy subpoenas related to the investigation into the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol. The testy exchange came during Monday’s White House press briefing, with Doocy arguing Biden had broken his previous vow not to instruct the DOJ to take up criminal investigations. (RELATED: Jan. 6 Committee Threatens Contempt Referrals Over Defied Subpoenas) “Why did the president break his promise not to enter into any decisions about what cases the Justice Department should bring and not bring?” Doocy asked, going on to describe how Biden had said “yes” in response to Friday questions about whether the DOJ should prosecute those who refuse subpoenas from the January 6 Committee. “The president continues to believe that January 6 was one of the darkest days in our democracy,” Psaki responded. “He also continues to believe that the Department of Justice has the purview and independence to make decisions about prosecutions. That continues to be his view and that continues to be...
    President Joe Biden said the Department of Justice (DOJ) should prosecute individuals who defy subpoenas surrounding the Jan. 6 riot on Friday, prompting quick damage control from the administration. Former chief of staff Mark Meadows, former administration official Kash Patel and former Trump aide Steve Bannon are among those hit with subpoenas from the Jan. 6 House select committee investigating the riot at the U.S. Capitol. Bannon has refused to comply with the subpoena and now faces potential criminal contempt charges. While the White House has tried to distance itself from the situation, Biden issued a firm opinion Friday evening, telling reporters that he does believe that anyone refusing a subpoena in this situation should face prosecution. “I hope that the committee goes after them and holds them accountable,” the president declared. (RELATED: Jan. 6 Committee Threatens Contempt Referrals Over Defied Subpoenas) The president’s comments mark a separation from the administration’s past messaging. White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters Thursday that it’s “up to the Department of Justice” and issued a reminder that “they’re [DOJ] an independent agency.” The...
    White House press secretary Jen Psaki tweeted a bit of a clarification Friday night to comments President Joe Biden made about the Justice Department. The January 6 select committee is planning to charge Steve Bannon with criminal contempt for defying their subpoena. They have subpoenaed a number of Trump allies and members have said they will take such action against anyone not complying with the requests. Biden said to reporters earlier Friday, “I hope that the committee goes after them and holds them accountable.” When asked if they should be prosecuted by the DOJ, Biden said he does. Psaki took to Twitter later to say Biden “supports the work of the committee and the independent role of the Department of Justice to make any decisions about prosecutions.” As @potus has said many times, January 6th was one of the darkest days in our democracy. He supports the work of the committee and the independent role of the Department of Justice to make any decisions about prosecutions. — Jen Psaki (@PressSec) October 16, 2021 A spokesperson for the...
    (CNN)President Joe Biden on Friday said those who refuse subpoenas from the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection should be prosecuted by the Justice Department.This is a breaking story and will be updated.
    President Joe Biden said on Friday he thinks the Department of Justice should prosecute any individuals who refuse to comply with subpoenas from the January 6 select committee. The committee is planning to charge Steve Bannon with criminal contempt for defying their subpoena. Committee members have indicated they would take such steps against anyone who refuses to cooperate with the investigation. CNN’s Kaitlan Collins asked Biden Friday what his message is to people defying subpoenas from the committee. “I hope that the committee goes after them and holds them accountable,” Biden said. “Should they be prosecuted by the Justice Department?” Collins asked. “I do, yes,” the president responded. You can watch above, via CNN. Have a tip we should know? [email protected]
    SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images The January 6 select committee has issued a subpoena to a key Trump DOJ figure involved in the effort to overturn the 2020 election. Former Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division Jeffrey Clark reportedly worked with Donald Trump on a plan to oust Jeffrey Rosen as Acting Attorney General and putting Clark in place so he could wield the power of the DOJ to challenge the election results in Georgia. There have been a lot of reports about how far Clark was taking this, including a truly bizarre one that said he wanted to “assess whether Chinese-made digital thermometers could connect with voting machines.” January 6 Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson announced Wednesday, “The Select Committee needs to understand all the details about efforts inside the previous administration to delay the certification of the 2020 election and amplify misinformation about the election results. We need to understand Mr. Clark’s role in these efforts at the Justice Department and learn who was involved across the administration. The Select Committee expects Mr. Clark to cooperate fully with...
    The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol has subpoenaed Jeffrey Clark, a Trump-ally and former Justice Department employee who urged its leaders to investigate President TrumpDonald TrumpHouse votes to raise debt ceiling Georgia reporter says state will 'continue to be a premier battleground' Elections administrator in Texas county Trump won resigns after campaign to oust her MORE’s election fraud claims. “The Select Committee’s investigation has revealed credible evidence that you attempted to involve the Department of Justice in efforts to interrupt the peaceful transfer of power,” the committee wrote in its letter. “You proposed that the department send a letter to state legislators in Georgia and other states suggesting that they delay certification of their election results and hold a press conference announcing that the department was investigating allegations of voter fraud.” Clark, the former acting Civil Division assistant attorney general, was at the center of a report from the Senate Judiciary Committee last week detailing Trump’s pressure campaign on DOJ’s highest ranking officials.  An otherwise little-known figure in the Justice Department, Clark was introduced to...
    (CNN)The House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is expected to subpoena Jeffrey Clark, a Justice Department official who was integral to helping then-President Donald Trump in his efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election, according to sources familiar with the matter. Clark, a Trump-appointed environment law chief at the Justice Department, has become a major figure in the emerging narrative about behind-the-scenes efforts by Trump and his closest allies to orchestrate a leadership coup at the Justice Department and peddle lies about election fraud. The Washington Post was first to report that Clark may be subpoenaed as early as Wednesday. Based on documents uncovered by the Senate Judiciary Committee, which has its own investigation, Clark drafted a letter December 28 to Georgia officials in which he falsely asserted the Department of Justice had found voting irregularities that impacted the outcomes of the presidential election in several states. The Justice Department by then had made clear it found no evidence of vote-changing in the election. Clark wanted acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue...
    Senate Democrats are quickly running into a GOP buzzsaw as they probe the Trump-era Justice Department’s collection of lawmaker records. Reports that the Department of Justice (DOJ) under former President TrumpDonald TrumpKushner lands book deal, slated for release in 2022 Biden moves to undo Trump trade legacy with EU deal Progressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC MORE obtained lawmaker communications data, and similar info on former White House Counsel Don McGahn, have sparked a days-long fury that’s sent Attorney General Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandThe Memo: Homegrown extremism won't be easily tamed Why the Biden administration must protect the press — even when it exposes government secrets  The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden readies for Putin meeting MORE scrambling to contain the fallout. As part of the fierce backlash from Capitol Hill, Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee launched a probe this week and are threatening to subpoena former Attorneys General William BarrBill BarrTrump, allies pressured DOJ to back election claims, documents show House Judiciary to probe DOJ's seizure of data from lawmakers, journalists Judge temporarily blocks release of Trump obstruction memo...
    House GOP Conference Chair Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikDemocrat Matt Putorti challenges Stefanik for NY House seat Recovering America through the lens of wildlife Former Trump aide eyeing New Hampshire congressional bid MORE (R-N.Y.) on Tuesday defended the Justice Department’s efforts to secretly seize phone, email and other records from a pair of House Democratic lawmakers, their aides and reporters as officials aggressively pursued leak investigations during the Trump era. Stefanik serves on the House Intelligence Committee, alongside two California Democrats and vocal critics of former President Donald TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ asks Supreme Court to revive Boston Marathon bomber death sentence, in break with Biden vow Biden looking to build momentum for Putin meeting DOJ tells media execs that reporters were not targets of investigations MORE, Intelligence Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHouse Judiciary to probe DOJ's seizure of data from lawmakers, journalists Outrage grows as Justice seeks to contain subpoena fallout Senate Judiciary begins investigation into DOJ lawmaker subpoenas MORE and Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellHouse Judiciary to probe DOJ's seizure of data from lawmakers, journalists Outrage grows as Justice seeks to...
    (CNN)The top two Senate Republican leaders were split Monday over the need for Congress to investigate secret Trump-era Justice Department subpoenas to two Democratic members of the House Intelligence Committee, both frequent critics of the former President.Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell defended the right of the Justice Department to carry out sensitive leak investigations when needed and warned against a probe by the Senate Judiciary Committee that could become "a partisan circus." He said the ongoing Justice Department inspector general's investigation is sufficient. But Senate Minority Whip John Thune, the second-ranking member of the GOP leadership, disagreed and said, "Obviously, this warrants further review and investigation.""Some of the allegations that have been made, I think it needs to be looked at, yeah," Thune said. "The information data that was grabbed from people on the Hill and others. That's something we need to know. How did they get that information? I assume the committees will work through that."The South Dakota Republican is influential in his conference but not a member of the evenly split Senate Judiciary Committee and therefore will not...
    The House Judiciary Committee announced on Monday that it would be opening an investigation into the Department of Justice's (DOJ) secret subpoenas of data from members of Congress and multiple journalists during the Trump administration. “Recent reports suggest that, during the Trump Administration, the Department of Justice used criminal investigations as a pretext to spy on President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden prepares to confront Putin Biden aims to bolster troubled Turkey ties in first Erdoğan meeting Senate investigation of insurrection falls short MORE’s perceived political enemies," panel Chairman Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerIowa man sentenced for threatening Rep. Jerry Nadler Supreme Court confounding its partisan critics Garland sparks anger with willingness to side with Trump MORE (D-N.Y.) said in the announcement. “It remains possible that these cases — which now include Members of Congress, members of the press, and President Trump’s own White House Counsel — are isolated incidents," Nadler added. "Even if these reports are completely unrelated, they raise serious constitutional and separation of power concerns. Congress must make it extraordinarily difficult, if not impossible, for the Department to spy on the Congress...
    (CNN)First we learned that former President Donald Trump's Department of Justice secretly obtained records about the communications of members of the press. Then we learned it secretly sought data about the communications of his political enemies in Congress.Now we have learned it secretly sought information about the communications of Trump's own White House counsel, Don McGahn. The rat-a-tat revelations raise more questions than they answer about why the Justice Department -- the federal agency charged with upholding America's rule of law, regardless of politics -- was so into the business of people the then-President viewed as his enemies. Add to years of the alarming public disclosures of what the department did under Trump the realization that the department under Biden has not exactly been publicly forthcoming with what happened under the previous leadership.Read MoreDemocrats are gearing up for a full-scale investigation of the whole affair. Appearing on CNN, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi compared the DOJ subpoenas to former President Richard Nixon's infamous "enemies list.""Richard Nixon had an enemies list. This is about undermining the rule of law," she said on...
    Multiple news reports emerged on Sunday stating the Trump Justice Department sought Apple records from former White House counsel Don McGahn, a revelation following McGahn’s recent congressional testimony and disclosures that the DOJ obtained records from members of Congress and journalists. Apple reportedly “told” McGahn in May that “the Justice Department had subpoenaed information about an account that belonged to him in February 2018, and that the government barred the company from telling him at the time," according to the New York Times. The outlet said McGahn’s wife received such a notice from Apple too. WATCHDOG WILL INVESTIGATE TRUMP DOJ LEAK SUBPOENAS AGAINST CONGRESS AND REPORTERS The report stated that Apple received the subpoena on Feb. 23, 2018, after it was “issued by a grand jury in the Eastern District of Virginia” and that “it is not clear what FBI agents were scrutinizing, nor whether Mr. McGahn was their specific focus," adding that Apple told McGahn “that it complied with the subpoena in a timely fashion but declined to tell him what it provided the government” and...
    Maine Sen. Susan Collins on Sunday said she supports an "in-depth investigation" into former President Donald Trump's Justice Department after reports surfaced that it subpoenaed information on House Democrats. On Thursday, the New York Times reported that then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions subpoenaed Apple in 2017 and 2018 for the data belonging to California Rep. Adam Schiff, then-ranking member of the committee, as well as panel staff and family members amid a hunt for the sources of leaks about Trump associates and their ties to Russia. The Maine Republican said "two serious allegations" warrant an inquiry from President Joe Biden's administration. "There are two serious allegations here," she told CBS News's John Dickerson. "One has to do with whether or not there was a leak of classified information by members of Congress. But the second, which is also important, is, has the Justice Department abused its power by going after members of Congress or the press for partisan, political purposes?" "And that's why I support the deputy attorney general's request that the inspector general of the Department of Justice do an in-depth...
    HOUSE Speaker Nancy Pelosi demanded that attorneys from the Trump administration testify under oath about efforts to secretly subpoena information from Democrats and the news media. The Justice Department under former President Donald Trump is accused of using the subpoenas to track down leaks about Trump and Russia. 5Pelosi demanded members of Trump's DOG testify under oathCredit: AFP 5Trump has been accused of 'politicizing' the Department of JusticeCredit: Getty Pelosi told CNN on Sunday that at least two Democrats and multiple news reporters were targeted by Trump's Department of Justice. “The Justice Department has been rogue under President Trump,” Pelosi said. “This is just another manifestation of their rogue activity.” Former Attorneys General Bill Barr and Jeff Sessions as well as former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will have to answer questions about the subpoenas. Pelosi said Trump's Justice Department went “even beyond Richard Nixon. Richard Nixon had an enemies list. This is about undermining the rule of law.” 5Former Attorney General Bill Barr is facing demands from Speaker Pelosi that he testify before CongressCredit:...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), holds her weekly press conference in the United States Capitol in Washington, May 13, 2021.Evelyn Hockstein | Reuters The Trump Justice Department's reported decision to subpoena tech companies for account data of U.S. lawmakers was a step that "goes even beyond Richard Nixon," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said in an interview on CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday. "Richard Nixon had an enemies list," Pelosi said. "This is about undermining the rule of law." The New York Times reported Thursday that the Justice Department under the former president in 2017 and 2018 subpoenaed Apple for information from the accounts of at least a dozen people tied to the House Intelligence Committee, including two Democratic lawmakers: Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif. Microsoft acknowledged Friday it had received a similar request. The investigation reportedly sought the source of leaks about contact between Trump associates and Russia. A gag order prevented Apple and Microsoft from initially notifying the owners of the affected accounts of the subpoenas, the companies said. Apple said it...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday said reports that former President Donald Trump's Department of Justice subpoenaed Democratic lawmakers go "beyond" the actions taken by Richard Nixon. On Thursday, the New York Times reported that then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions subpoenaed Apple in 2017 and 2018 for the data belonging to California Rep. Adam Schiff, then-ranking member of the committee, as well as panel staff and family members amid a hunt for the sources of leaks about Trump associates and their ties to Russia. Pelosi vowed to bring both Sessions and former Attorney General William Barr before Congress to testify about the allegations after the pair denied the claims. “What the Republicans did — what the administration did ... goes even beyond Richard Nixon," Pelosi told CNN's Dana Bash. "Richard Nixon had an enemies list. This is about undermining the rule of law, and for these attorneys general ... or Sessions, at least, to say they, too, didn’t know anything about it is beyond belief.” WATCHDOG WILL INVESTIGATE TRUMP DOJ LEAK SUBPOENAS AGAINST CONGRESS AND REPORTERS “So we will...
    Jeff Sessions, William Barr and Rod Rosenstein have all denied knowledge of secret subpoenas Trump's Justice Department sent to Microsoft and Apple to access data from members of Congress. Trump and his administration were infuriated after detailed conversations between his aides and the Russian ambassador to the U.S. were leaked shortly after he took office in January 2017.  The Justice Department sent a secret subpoena to Apple on February 6, 2018 for 73 phone numbers and 36 email addresses that included accounts for Democratic Reps. Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell while probing the embarrassing leaks. Neither Sessions, who served as Attorney General at the time the administration started probing the leaks, nor his deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein knew about the subpoena, a source close to them told the Wall Street Journal on Friday. Sessions, left, served as Attorney General at the time and Rosenstein, right, served as his deputy. Neither knew about the subpoena, a source close to them said Barr also said he was 'not aware of any congressman's records being sought in a leak case' while he...
    Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz took the side of Democrats on Friday, criticizing the Trump-era Justice Department over seizures of communications records of at least two Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee who raised concerns about the "politicization" of the agency. The staunch Trump ally emerged as one of the few Republicans to speak out after the New York Times reported on Thursday the Justice Department subpoenaed Apple in 2017 and 2018 for the data belonging to California Rep. Adam Schiff, then-ranking member of the committee, as well as panel staff and family members amid a hunt for the sources of leaks about Trump associates and their ties to Russia. “DOJ has a very nasty tendency to target its critics, Republican and Democrat,” Gaetz said in a statement reported by Politico. “The Schiff story reminded me of the DOJ’s threats to use criminal process against House staff exposing their misdeeds,” Gaetz said. “I stand against all of it, no matter how much I personally dislike Schiff.” WATCHDOG WILL INVESTIGATE TRUMP DOJ LEAK SUBPOENAS AGAINST CONGRESS AND REPORTERS...
    The Department of Justice's top watchdog announced it is looking into recent revelations that the DOJ sought subpoenas against Democratic members of Congress and reporters as part of the investigation into alleged leaks of classified information to the media. The office for Michael Horowitz announced the new watchdog investigation on Friday. “The DOJ OIG is reviewing the DOJ’s use of subpoenas and other legal authorities to obtain communication records of Members of Congress and affiliated persons, and the news media in connection with recent investigations of alleged unauthorized disclosures of information to the media by government officials,” the DOJ inspector general’s office said. “The review will examine the Department’s compliance with applicable DOJ policies and procedures, and whether any such uses, or the investigations, were based upon improper considerations. If circumstances warrant, the OIG will consider other issues that may arise during the review." This follows a Thursday report by the New York Times that while Jeff Sessions served as attorney general in 2017 and 2018, prosecutors “subpoenaed Apple for data from the accounts of at least...
    The Department of Justice’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) will review the subpoenas of communications records belonging to two House Democrats and the New York Times. “The DOJ OIG is reviewing the DOJ’s use of subpoenas and other legal authorities to obtain communication records of Members of Congress and affiliated persons, and the news media in connection with recent investigations of alleged unauthorized disclosures of information to the media by government officials,” the Office announced in a Friday press release. Department of Justice Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz announced today the initiation of a Review of the DOJ’s Use of Subpoenas & Other Legal Authorities to Obtain Communication Records of Members of Congress and Affiliated Persons, and the News Mediahttps://t.co/sMbYCmldju pic.twitter.com/Ft0JRYvMGN — Justice OIG (@JusticeOIG) June 11, 2021 The phone metadata of Democratic California Reps. Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell was subpoenaed by the DOJ in 2017 and 2018 as part of a wider probe into leaks associated with the Russia investigation. Their staffers and family members’ communications were also subpoenaed. Emails belonging to four New York Times...
    WPhoto by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz is investigating the department’s subpoenas to obtain the communications of members of Congress and journalists. This announcement comes on the heels of stunning new reporting from the New York Times that during a Trump-era leak investigation, prosecutors actually subpoenaed Apple directly for the accounts of Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell — both on the House Intelligence Committee — and their aides and family members, apparently even including one minor. There has been a fair amount of uproar over the new revelations, especially on the heels of multiple reports about the Trump DOJ seizing communications of journalists at CNN, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. The statement from the DOJ OIG office announced a review Friday: The DOJ Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is initiating a review of DOJ’s use of subpoenas and other legal authorities to obtain communication records of Members of Congress and affiliated persons, and the news media in connection with recent investigations of alleged unauthorized disclosures of information to the media by government officials....
    The Justice Department's internal watchdog will investigate the secret seizure of data from Democratic lawmakers and reporters during leak investigations initiated under the Trump administration. The probe follows news of a department decision in 2017 and 2018 to issue subpoenas seeking metadata from House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffTrump DOJ seized House Democrats' data from Apple Hillicon Valley: Meat producer JBS USA hit by cyberattack | White House says JBS hack likely from Russia | Report finds Amazon injury rate above warehouse standard New Russian hacks spark calls for tougher Biden actions MORE (D-Calif.) and fellow committee member Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellGaetz, under investigative cloud, questions FBI director GOP lawmaker deletes tweet that appeared to mistakenly reveal email password The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Harris take US goals abroad MORE (D-Calif.) during leak investigations. In recent weeks the Department of Justice (DOJ) also notified reporters at three different outlets their records were sought in similar investigations and dropped the gag orders limiting disclosure of the seizure. “The review will examine the Department’s...
    Biden’s plan to fight online harassment could set up new confrontation with tech Pizza Hut to launch Beyond Meat sausage topping in the US Nikola reveals it has received subpoenas from DOJ, SEC Nikola Motor Company, a manufacturer of electric and fuel cell trucks, announced in a regulatory filing Monday that it has received subpoenas from the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice in connection to fraud allegations leveled at the company by a short-seller. © Nikola Former Nikola executive chairman Trevor Milton stands next to a truck at Nikola World 2019 Nikola's founder, Trevor Milton, who resigned from the company in September amid the fraud allegations, also received grand jury subpoenas from the Department of Justice, according to Nikola's most recent quarterly earnings statement. The subpoenas were received in September, according to Nikola. Nikola, which declined to comment for this story, has not provided additional detail about what the subpoenas pertain to. Load Error Nikola said in the filing that it cooperated and will continue to cooperate with any regulatory or government requests....
    Washington, DC (CNN)Nikola Motor Company, a manufacturer of electric and fuel cell trucks, announced in a regulatory filing Monday that it has received subpoenas from the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice in connection to fraud allegations leveled at the company by a short-seller.Nikola's founder, Trevor Milton, who resigned from the company in September amid the fraud allegations, also received grand jury subpoenas from the Department of Justice, according to Nikola's most recent quarterly earnings statement. The subpoenas were received in September, according to Nikola. Nikola, which declined to comment for this story, has not provided additional detail about what the subpoenas pertain to.Nikola said in the filing that it cooperated and will continue to cooperate with any regulatory or government requests. Nikola founder Trevor Milton stepped down as Executive Chairman and a member of its board of directors in September after short-seller Hindenburg Research published a report that accused Milton and the startup of misleading investors. Milton said at the time that the report was a "hit job" and "lies."Nikola CEO Mark Russell said on the...
    Electric-truck maker Nikola revealed late Monday that it was hit with a grand jury subpoena from the Justice Department in September amid accusations that the company has lied about its technology. The embattled startup’s former CEO Trevor Milton — who left the company following a slew of allegations by a short-seller claiming that the company was an “intricate fraud,” and who was later accused of sexual assault — received a subpoena as well, the company said in a securities filing. Nikola also said it received a grand jury subpoena from the New York County District Attorney’s office the same month, as well as subpoenas from the Securities and Exchange Commission to its board and eight of its officers and employees. The scrutiny from law enforcement came following allegations from short seller Hindenburg Research that Milton made bogus claims about his automaker’s technology in order to secure important corporate partnerships, including with General Motors, which has taken an 11-percent stake in Nikola and entered into a multibillion-dollar manufacturing deal with the company. In its report, Hindenburg called Nikola “an intricate fraud built...
    Trevor Milton CEO of NikolaMassimo Pinca | Reuters Nikola and its founder Trevor Milton received grand jury subpoenas from the U.S. Department of Justice in September in connection to allegations of fraud by short-seller Hindenburg, the embattled electric-truck maker said in a regulatory filing late on Monday. The company also received a grand jury subpoena from the New York County District Attorney's Office in September. Grand juries are typically impaneled in criminal investigations. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission also issued subpoenas to Nikola, its board and eight of its officers and employees in September, the company disclosed in the filing, which was prompted by the short-seller's scathing report earlier that month. The Monday filing came hours after Nikola CEO Mark Russell told investors that the company was "fully cooperating" with requests by federal investigators regarding the short-seller report. "Nikola proactively contacted and briefed the SEC during their quarter regarding our concerns pertaining to a report published by a short-seller," Russell said during its third-quarter earnings call. "Our council has been in close contact with the SEC and the...
    The Department of Justice (DOJ) has opened a criminal investigation into whether President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser John Bolton disclosed classified information in his recent book. The DOJ convened a grand jury, which issued subpoenas to Simon & Schuster, the publisher of Bolton’s memoir “The Room Where It Happened,” according to The New York Times. The grand jury also issued a subpoena to Bolton’s literary agency Javelin, The Wall Street Journal reported. The Trump administration previously tried to block the release of the book — which was highly critical of the president — over claims that it contained classified information. The move was ultimately unsuccessful. Nevertheless, Trump’s handpicked director of national intelligence John Ratcliffe referred the matter to the DOJ’s national security division last month, which opened a criminal investigation, according to The Times. Bolton has denied that his memoir contained any classified information. Though he agreed to let the administration review its contents in order to make sure it did not contain classified intelligence, the DOJ accused Bolton of allowing Simon & Schuster to release the book ahead of final approval. The agency unsuccessfully attempted to block the book’s release. “With hundreds of thousands of copies around the globe...
    House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler issued subpoenas for testimony from two Justice Department whistleblowers who have filed complaints about the “unprecedented politicization” of the department under Attorney General Bill Barr and President Trump. Nadler, D-N.Y., issued the subpoenas Tuesday for current DOJ employees Aaron S.J. Zelinsky and John W. Elias, who he said would describe their experience at the Justice Department during a hearing before the committee on June 24. NADLER CALLS FOR SLASHING AG BUDGET IN LATEST SWIPE AT BARR Zelinksy, according to Nadler, is expected to speak on the Justice Department’s handling of the sentencing of Trump aide Roger Stone, while Elias “can speak to improperly motivated activity by the Antitrust Division.” “Again and again, Attorney General Barr has demonstrated that he will cater to President Trump’s private political interests, at the expense of the American people and the rule of law,” Nadler said in a statement. “He has abruptly reversed course on prosecutions against the President’s allies and friends. He has pursued pretextual investigations against the President’s perceived political enemies.” Nadler went on to claim that Barr...
    (CNN)The Justice Department is trying to stop subpoenas of Trump-related businesses in a case over whether President Donald Trump is illegally accepting emoluments by owning the Trump International Hotel in Washington, DC. Friday's request comes as the Trump administration formally said it plans to appeal the case to the Supreme Court.A federal appeals court last month revived a lawsuit by Maryland and the District of Columbia over the ownership of his hotel on Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington.Maryland and DC sent out subpoenas in late 2018 for financial details Trump has long sought to protect, but Trump succeeded in keeping them on hold while he and the Justice Department appealed. Those subpoenas could become active again if the Supreme Court doesn't move quickly.Appeals court lets emoluments lawsuit against Trump proceed "The government intends to seek Supreme Court review, but in the interim, this unprecedented case will continue and discovery will resume unless the stay is extended," the Justice Department wrote to the 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals. "That intrusive and burdensome discovery into the President's financial affairs and official actions,...
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