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    This Thursday, June 10, the second eclipse of the year and the first solar one took place. It has been a “ring of fire” or annular eclipse, because the sun could be seen as a ring around the moon, when the satellite passes in front of the Astro Rey. This occurs because the moon is not far enough away from Earth to cover the entire sun, as is the case during total eclipses. The most important thing when observing a solar eclipse is to take the proper precautions so as not to damage your eyesight. Approved glasses, lenses or filters. Another option is to use a pinhole camera (a cardboard box) and project the image, never look directly. Using cameras and other devices not specifically adapted for eclipse observation can damage the equipment. You can see the broadcast that we do live in the player above. We offered a selection of the best sources to observe it. Among them the astronomical observatory of Torcal de Antequera, in Malaga, presented by the astronomer Javier Gálvez Fernández, director of the Aula del...
    Eager skywatchers across the globe were gifted a spectacular annular solar eclipse Thursday morning — and they didn't pass up the opportunity to document it. Millions of people around the world marveled at the sight, which appeared as a glowing "ring of fire" in the night sky.  Astrophotographers pulled out all the stops to capture stunning images of the celestial phenomenon, which was fully visible in parts of Canada, Greenland, the Arctic Ocean and Siberia, and partially visible for much of the rest of northeastern North America, Greenland, northern Europe and northern Asia.  A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun's light. During an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes, leaving some sunlight visible. Because the moon appears smaller under these circumstances, it cannot fully block out the sun, forming what's called a "ring of fire" or "ring of light."  This was just one of two solar eclipses this year. A total solar eclipse will be visible on December 4. ...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – The “ring of fire” solar eclipse made its first appearance in Pittsburgh in over four years, but it wasn’t just here that stargazers set their alarms early to try and catch a glimpse. Thursday morning offered a moment to remember. READ MORE: Child Tax Credit: When Do Your Monthly Checks Start? “This was an awesome morning for a lot of people who woke up around the world to enjoy the solar eclipse,” said Mike Hennessy, manager of the Carnegie Science Center Buhl Planetarium. People worldwide watched as the solar eclipse lit up the sky. Locally, many went to Mt. Washington to witness it all unfold. My view of this mornings solar eclipse pic.twitter.com/vqtChQuj7F — Scott Danka (@dankfloydKDKA) June 10, 2021 READ MORE: Southwest Adds 2 Seasonal Non-Stop Flights At Pittsburgh International Airport “Some folks who did get to see it were treated to seeing a crescent sun,” said Hennessy. “We’re used to seeing a crescent moon in the sky at different times of the month. Folks who saw the partial eclipse today were treated to seeing...
    Miami (CBSMiami) — Skywatchers across parts of the Northern Hemisphere were able to watch an amazing celestial show early Thursday morning, the first of two solar eclipses this year, unfortunately, it wasn’t visible in South Florida. Thursday’s solar eclipse is called the “ring of fire” because it is an ‘annular solar eclipse.’ READ MORE: Coral Springs Police Department Announces Community Ambassador Program To Build Trust Within The Community According to NASA, during an annular solar eclipse, the moon is positioned near or at apogee, which is the farthest point from Earth. At this point, the moon is so far away, it can’t block the entire sun during the solar eclipse. So a thin, fiery ring is exposed during an annular solar eclipse. This type of eclipse is different than a total solar eclipse in which the entire sun is blocked, and no bright light is visible. READ MORE: Royal Caribbeans New Odyssey Of The Seas Arrives At Port Everglades “It is important to point out that the word annular should not be confused by the word “annual” as the two...
    More On: solar eclipse NYC stargazers eagerly await the 2021 ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse 2021: When, where and how to see it Black hole sun: How to safely view the first US solar eclipse since 2017 Total solar eclipse cuts path across South America The early bird catches the solar eclipse. New Yorkers were pounding the pavement a little earlier than usual on Thursday morning as they took to the streets to spot the first solar eclipse of 2021 — a “ring of fire” eclipse that was like a blazing halo in the dawn sky. Also called an “annular” eclipse — from the Latin root “anulus” meaning “ring” — the phenomenon occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth’s line of sight towards the Sun. As the moon’s orbit is currently at one of its furthest points away from Earth, its passing has caused what appears as a black void in the middle of our solar system’s star — rather than the more familiar total solar eclipse. Whereas some parts...
    For a few hours on Thursday morning, the sun was almost completely covered by the moon, causing a solar eclipse.  The so-called “ring of fire” is caused when the silhouette of the moon is covered by an orbit of the home star's surface. Thursday's ring of fire started after sunrise north of Lake Superior and began crossing remote regions of Canada, on its way into Greenland and the Arctic Ocean before going over the North Pole, the New York Times reported.  Several news organizations and social media users, including some in Washington, D.C, New York City, and other locations along the East Coast, were able to catch a glimpse of the somewhat rare astronomical event.  Time lapse: The #SolarEclipse rises behind the Mackinac Bridge in northern Michigan this morning. pic.twitter.com/qzszdG1iuk— John Kraus (@johnkrausphotos) June 10, 2021 Partially eclipsed sun rising over the National Mall as seen from the Air Force Memorial #SolarEclipse #capitalweather pic.twitter.com/yun3LzAPEZ— Luke Ward (@Luke__Ward) June 10, 2021 Shot by my daughter, processed by me. #Eclipse2021 #solareclipse2021 #SolarEclipse #annulareclipse pic.twitter.com/RZQ3R0quxh— Andrea Girones ⚖️ (@AndreaGirones) June 10, 2021 This morning's...
    The "Ring of Fire" solar eclipse stunned skywatchers around the world Thursday morning.  In a cloudy New York City, the partial eclipse peeked from behind gray, puffy clouds as residents commuted to work. NASA CHIEF BILL NELSON OPTIMISTIC ABOUT SPACE EXPLORATION AS PRIVATE SECTOR, GOVERNMENT COMBINE EFFORTS Images from social media showed the eclipse behind bridges, illuminating red dawn skies and as a backdrop to iconic landmarks. A partial solar eclipse rises over the Baltimore skyline, Thursday, June 10, 2021, seen from Arbutus, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Elsewhere across the Northern Hemisphere, the annular eclipse could be seen fully as the moon passed between the Earth and the sun, partially obscuring the star from view and leaving its outer ring exposed. While the annular "ring of fire" eclipse was visible to residents of certain parts of Canada, Greenland and northern Russia, much of the Great White North, parts of the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, northern Africa, the eastern U.S. and northern Alaska were able to see the partial eclipse. Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square, London, is silhouetted by...
    Jonathan Amos BBC Science Reporter 2 hours ago Photo editor, Getty Images On Thursday, most of the residents of the Northern Hemisphere will see a solar eclipse. This time it will be an annual eclipse. When the moon partially closes the solar disk, it leaves its thin edge. This phenomenon is best seen in the Arctic. Many do not live there, but most of the world can see a part of the sun “bite” the moon. The eclipse began in Kiev at 13:26, according to the British Hydrographic Service. It will arrive at a maximum of 14:15 and end at 15:03. Maximum eclipse in Kiev – 5.1% Areas that observe this astronomical phenomenon are the eastern part of the United States, northern Alaska, most of Canada, Greenland and part of Europe and Asia. Photo editor, BBC Caption for photo, Eclipse Map – This is best seen in the areas marked in red Scientists, as always, advise not to try to see the sun with the naked eye. This can cause severe damage to the eyesight. This can be...
    TODAY marks the first solar eclipse of 2021 and it's visible in lots of countries all over the world. The partial eclipse will appear as a 'ring of fire' in some locations while in others it just appears to take a small chunk out of the Sun. 10The Sun rising in an eclipse above Brooklyn Bridge in New York CityCredit: Alamy 10The partial eclipse over Baltimore in the USCredit: AP 10The view from Canada as the Sun rose this morningCredit: TimeandDate 10The Sun over Houses of Parliament in LondonCredit: Getty 10The eclipsed sunrise over Scituate Massachusetts in the USCredit: Getty 10The partial eclipse starting above The Shard in LondonCredit: LNP The ring of fire occurs during an annular or partial solar eclipse. A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth. During an annular eclipse, the moon is far enough away from the Earth so the moon appears smaller than the sun in the sky. As it appears to be smaller, it doesn’t completely block out the sun so when it passes in front of the...
    CHICAGO (CBS)– A partial “Ring of Fire” solar eclipse was visible from Chicago early Thursday morning. Partial solar eclipse happening right now in Chicago! @cbschicago pic.twitter.com/SAO6hZ8nUw READ MORE: Chicago Weather: Temperatures Heating Up — Laura Bannon (@LBannonWX) June 10, 2021 READ MORE: Chicago Weather: A Foggy Start On Thursday CBS 2 meteorologist Laura Bannon shared a photo of the partial eclipse. Bannon said the eclipse was at 23% coverage at sunrise at 5:16 a.m. in Chicago. MORE NEWS: While Lincolnwood Town Center Mall Is Struggling, Official Says Villages Fiscal Footing Is Sound She says to make sure you use eye protection when viewing the eclipse.
    BOSTON (CBS) – A partial solar eclipse dominated the sky across Massachusetts early Thursday morning for more than an hour. It started very slowly at 5:07 a.m. as the moon passed between the Earth and the sun. It was tough to see for awhile due to the cloud cover, but the view improved around 5:45 a.m. and lasted until about 6:30 a.m. This was not a total solar eclipse, but instead something called an “annular eclipse.” This occurs when the moon is in its first lunar phase and farther away from Earth in its orbit. Being farther away, the moon appears smaller and therefore cannot block out the entire solar disk. Instead, the moon covered the majority of the inner region of the sun, leaving just a sliver of light around the edges, giving it the name “ring of fire.” Our videographer in Lynn just captured this awesome shot of today’s partial solar eclipse from Lynn. We’re following it on #WBZThisMorning. #Eclipse #SolarEclipse pic.twitter.com/iGNg920TAb — Liam Martin (@LiamWBZ) June 10, 2021 In order to see the complete “ring of...
    THE ring of fire solar eclipse is an important astronomical event taking place on June 10. Not only will this eclipse create a beautiful 'ring of fire' observable in northern parts of the world, but its effects will be felt throughout all signs of the zodiac. Find out how this will affect your star sign below! ???? Read our horoscopes live blog for the latest readings 2The effects of the ring of fire solar eclipse will be felt throughout all signs of the zodiacCredit: AFP Coinciding with the new moon, this annular solar eclipse is a powerful time for new beginnings. Every sign of the zodiac is going to feel the effects of this, and it is an opportunity to reassess and figure out where you want your next steps in life to take you. This June's ring of fire eclipse falls in the star sign of Gemini, so you can expect relationships and communication with others to be especially affected. Aries You will have no problem with the new beginnings sparked by this powerful ring of fire eclipse. Simply...
    Miami (CBSMiami) — Just a few weeks after May’s lunar eclipse, another very cool celestial event will take place on Thursday, June 10. This time it will be a solar eclipse called the “ring of fire.” “This is such a blazing name that catches our attention, and we absolutely need an explanation for why this solar eclipse is named like this,” said CBS4 Meteorologist Jennifer Correa. READ MORE: Jennifer Lopez Takes Time To Take Photo With Police While Filming Latest Music Video In Miami Beach June 10th’s solar eclipse is called the “ring of fire” because it is an ‘annular solar eclipse.’ According to NASA, during an annular solar eclipse, the moon is positioned near or at apogee, which is the farthest point from Earth. At this point, the moon is so far away, it can’t block the entire sun during the solar eclipse. So a thin, fiery ring is exposed during an annular solar eclipse. This type of eclipse is different than a total solar eclipse in which the entire sun is blocked, and no bright light is visible....
    LOOKING at a solar eclipse without the proper protection can be highly damaging to your eyes. Here’s how to watch safely. 3People are advised not to watch the eclipse without special eye protectionCredit: Alamy Live News Can you look at the solar eclipse? Stargazers will be able to watch the spectacle of a solar eclipse later this morning but Brits are warned to make sure they have the proper protection as looking directly at the sun can cause blindness. Never look directly at the sun during a solar eclipse. Looking directly at the sun can cause permanent damage to your eyes. After viewing a solar eclipse, seek treatment from an eye care professional if you or your child have any changes in vision that continue to get worse. Exposing your eyes to the sun without proper eye protection during a solar eclipse can cause “eclipse blindness” or retinal burns, also known as solar retinopathy.  3Using sunglasses, even with UV protection,...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Last month’s “super flower blood moon” lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. This week brings an even bigger spectacle — a rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse. On June 10, skywatchers all over the world will be able to view the eclipse. READ MORE: Allegheny County Jail Guard Accused Of Bringing Drugs Into Jail Indicted On Gun Charge What is an annular solar eclipse? A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun’s light. During an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes, leaving a glowing ring of sunlight visible. An annular eclipse can only occur under specific conditions, NASA says. The moon must be in its first lunar phase, and it must also be farther away from Earth in its elliptical orbit, appearing smaller in the sky than it usually would. Because the moon appears smaller under these circumstances, it cannot fully block out the sun, forming what’s called a “ring...
    Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters. If you need an escape hatch from the earthly howlers and horrors of a diminished but still-thrashing Donald Trump (“Donald Trump for…speaker of the House?” asks CNN), catch tomorrow’s solar eclipse. It’s a “ring of fire” taking a rare path over the North Pole. It’s also a good way to avert your eyes for a minute, and a timely reminder of how far humanity has (mostly) come in accepting more and more scientific explanations of causation despite the crush of disinformation and delusion. The Washington Post has a classic explainer on “the strangest, scariest eclipse myths throughout history.” Consider the ritual human sacrifice performed by Aztecs to “feed and strengthen the sun and ward off the eclipse,” and the bear-bit-the-sun theory of eclipse. Or the theory that a vampire is at fault, having tried to swallow the sun before the vamp “spat it out when it burned his tongue,” causing the eclipse. Or the belief...
    Getty Ring of fire solar eclipse. Early on Thursday, June 10, a rare annular solar eclipse is taking place. The moon is passing over the sun, creating a partial eclipse that looks like a “ring of fire” around the moon. Because the moon appears smaller in the sky, it won’t completely block out the sun. Instead, you’ll enjoy what appears to be a “ring of fire” around the sun instead. If you’re in a location where you can’t see the eclipse or if the weather isn’t cooperating, then you can watch online via the live streams below.How to Watch the Eclipse OnlineYou can watch the ring of fire eclipse in a variety of live streams, including the selection listed below. Weather permitting, NASA will be streaming a live feed of the eclipse, which you can watch in the embedded video below or at this link if the video doesn’t work correctly on your browser. NASA wrote on YouTube about the video: “Weather permitting, NASA will carry a feed of the annular solar eclipse on June 10, 2021 over...
    More On: astronomy ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse 2021: When, where and how to see it How to watch the ‘super flower blood moon’ lunar eclipse tonight Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this week: Here’s how to see it Lyrid meteor shower peaks April 22: When, where, how to see it On Thursday, the Big Apple will get a glimpse of how small it really is. Beginning at 5:24 a.m., as daylight breaks over the five boroughs, New Yorkers will witness a crescent-shaped sun peeking over the horizon. The moon will cover about 70 percent of the sun at that time, peaking at 72.5 percent coverage eight minutes later. The so-called “ring of fire” eclipse will remain visible until 6:30 a.m. “It’s a moment that you can be participating in something far bigger than yourself,” said Jackie Faherty, Ph.D., 42, an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History on the Upper West Side, who plans on viewing the special sun — which has also been dubbed “Devil’s Horns” because of the red silhouette it creates as it rises...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO/CBS News) — Last month’s “super flower blood moon” lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. Thursday morning will bring an even bigger spectacle — a rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse. On June 10, skywatchers in parts across the world will be able to view the eclipse. Though, as always, some places will be more ideal than others, and some will miss out entirely. READ MORE: Minnetrista Declares Water Emergency As Heat Wave Drags On The narrow path of the eclipse will be completely visible in parts of Canada, Greenland, the Arctic Ocean and Siberia. It will be partially visible for much of the rest of northeastern North America, Greenland, Northern Europe and northern Asia. From the Washington, D.C. area, the moon will block about 80% of the left side of the sun as they rise together in the east-northeast at 5:42 a.m. The sun will appear as a crescent during this time, NASA says. In Minnesota, WCCO director of meteorology Mike Augustyniak says that Minnesota is not likely to really see any...
    (CBS DETROIT) – This week Michiganders will be able to see an annular solar eclipse throughout the state. The eclipse will be visible on Thursday morning from about 5:50 a.m. until 9:11 a.m. READ MORE: Police: 37-Year-Old Injured In Detroit Shooting Paulette Epstein, planetarium director, staff astronomer and solar system ambassador at the Michigan Science Center told the Detroit Free Press only part of this eclipse will be visible from our location as the sun rises. The next solar eclipse visible from North America will be on Oct. 14, 2023. Will Clarkson, associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Michigan-Dearborn told the Detroit Free Press to get the best possible view of the eclipse on Thursday you will need an unobstructed view of the horizon, like a city park or tall building. READ MORE: Henry Ford, 11 Other Health Systems Pledge To Add $1 Billion In Spending On Small Businesses Affected By COVID-19 Epstein suggested using a pinhole projector to view the annual solar eclipse since a solar eclipse is never safe to look at with the...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – This week the sun and moon will work in tandem to serve up a feast for the eyes. Set a reminder for Thursday, June 10, so you don’t miss the “Ring of Fire” solar eclipse. This partial or annular solar eclipse will be created as the moon passes in front of the sun. On this date, however, the moon on its elliptical orbit of the Earth will be positioned too far from the gazes of Earthlings to completely cover over the sun. This will leave visible a bright annulus, or ring, around the moon’s silhouette at mid-eclipse. This effect inspired the name “ring of fire” eclipse. READ MORE: Small Earthquake Reported Near Tuckerton In Ocean County, New Jersey Not everyone in the U.S. will be lucky enough to witness this exhilarating phenomenon, but we in the Delaware Valley will! The annular solar eclipse will be visible across the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and portions of the Southeast and Midwest, and Northern Alaska. In greater Philadelphia, the celestial event will be in progress at sunrise, but the maximum eclipse...
    (CNN)The moon will partially block out the sun this Thursday to create a "ring of fire" solar eclipse.Some people in the Northern Hemisphere will be able to catch the first of two solar eclipses this year on June 10. A solar eclipse happens when the moon crosses between the sun and the Earth, which blocks a portion of the sun's rays, according to NASA.This eclipse is an annular eclipse, meaning the moon is far enough away from the Earth that it appears smaller than the sun. When the moon crosses paths with the fiery star, it will look smaller than the sun, leaving room for bright light to glow around the edges. This is called "the ring of fire" and will be visible to some people in Greenland, northern Russia and Canada, NASA said.The mysterious origin of the northern lights has been provenRead MoreThe name "annular" comes from the Latin word "annulus," which means ring-shaped, according to Farmers' Almanac. Other countries in the Northern Hemisphere, including the United Kingdom and Ireland, will be able to see a partial eclipse, which...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Thursday morning could be the sunrise of our lifetime. At 5:24 a.m., the sun will rise as a partial eclipse. READ MORE: Tribeca Festival Returns With Highly Anticipated In The Heights Premiere “What you’re going to get on Thursday morning is something everybody wants. It’s a show in the sky,” Jackie Faherty told CBS2. “A partial eclipse is so dramatic, it’s like the Death Star moving in front of the sun.” A sunrise eclipse like this has only happened twice since the 1800s. This one is an annular eclipse, meaning the moon is not quite big enough to cover the sun completely. Web Extra: When, Where And How To Safely View The Eclipse “The way you can demonstrate this very easily is reach into your pocket, grab a nickel and a penny… Now, I challenge you to cover that nickel with the penny. You won’t be able to do so,” said Joe Rao, from the Hayden Planetarium. “The sun will come up looking like a crescent or a sickle or a slice of cantaloupe melon, if...
    More On: astronomy How to watch the ‘super flower blood moon’ lunar eclipse tonight Eta Aquarid meteor shower peaks this week: Here’s how to see it Lyrid meteor shower peaks April 22: When, where, how to see it Astronomers announce unprecedented data on famous supermassive black hole The early bird gets the worm — and on Thursday, June 10, the early riser will get quite the stellar sight. A stunning “ring of fire” solar eclipse, otherwise known as an “annular” eclipse, is not only a rare occurrence but one that will also grace the sky over parts of the northern hemisphere that day. And depending on where you are on Earth, you’ll either see the fiery ring that its name suggests, or a cool-looking eclipse that resembles the sun with a bite taken out of it. Most of all, it will give onlookers an overwhelming sense of how small we really are in the universe. “It’s a moment that you can be participating in that’s something far bigger than yourself,” said Jackie Faherty, Ph.D., an astrophysicist at the American...
    A RING of fire is an effect caused during a particular type of solar eclipse. Here’s what we know about the spectacular event. ☀️Follow all our solar eclipse live blog for all the latest updates and sightings AFP 3 A total eclipse seen from Piedra del Aquila, Neuquen province, Argentina, on December 14, 2020 What is the ring of fire? The ring of fire occurs during an annular or partial solar eclipse. A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth. During an annular eclipse, the moon is far enough away from the Earth so the moon appears smaller than the sun in the sky. As it appears to be smaller, it doesn’t completely block out the sun so when it passes in front of the sun it leaves a circular, orangey-red ring-like border to the human eye. That effect is called an “annulus” or ring of fire around the moon. AFP 3 The moon moves in front of the sun in a rare ‘ring of fire’ solar eclipse as seen from Balut...
    The first solar eclipse of 2021 will be visible to the Northern Hemisphere on Thursday morning.  It will appear as a "sunrise event," with the moon passing between the Earth and the sun and partially obscuring the star from view and leaving its outer ring exposed. The annular "ring of fire" eclipse will be best viewed by residents of parts of Canada, Greenland and northern Russia, according to NASA. BLOOD MOON LUNAR ECLIPSE ENTHRALLS VIEWERS However, in the eastern U.S. and northern Alaska, a partial solar eclipse – without the annulus or "ring of fire" – will occur, appearing as if the moon has taken a "bite" out of the sun. Much of Canada and parts of the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, and northern Africa will also only see a partial eclipse. Livestreams for the event begin in the early morning and viewers in the eastern U.S. are advised to get a clear view of the eastern horizon to observe it. TOPSHOT - This composite image shows the moon as it moves in front of the sun in a rare...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Last month’s “super flower blood moon” lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. This week brings an even bigger spectacle — a rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse. On June 10, skywatchers all over the world will be able to view the eclipse. READ MORE: Tarentum Bridge Closure For Several Weeks Begins What is an annular solar eclipse? A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun’s light. During an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes, leaving a glowing ring of sunlight visible. An annular eclipse can only occur under specific conditions, NASA says. The moon must be in its first lunar phase, and it must also be farther away from Earth in its elliptical orbit, appearing smaller in the sky than it usually would. Because the moon appears smaller under these circumstances, it cannot fully block out the sun, forming what’s called a “ring of fire” or “ring of light.” “As...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Get ready. On Thursday, June 10, we are in for an astronomical treat at sunrise. A “ring of fire” solar eclipse! Sound terrifying? Nothing to worry about here, but instead a somewhat rare and fantastic solar show. READ MORE: Steamship Authority Ferry Service Still Feeling Effects Of Ransomware Attack Backing up a bit. . . no doubt you have all heard of or seen a “total solar eclipse” at one point in your lifetime. This is when the New Moon passes between the Earth and Sun, completely blocking the sun from our view. The entire landscape goes from day to night in minutes, followed by a lot of “ooohhs” and “ahhhhs.” This event is NOT a total solar eclipse, but instead something called an “annular eclipse.” This occurs when the Moon is in its first lunar phase and farther away from Earth in its orbit. Being farther away, the Moon appears smaller and therefore cannot block out the entire solar disk. Instead, the Moon will cover the majority of the inner region of the sun, leaving just...
    Last month's "super flower blood moon" lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. This week brings an even bigger spectacle — a rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse. On June 10, skywatchers all over the world will be able to view the eclipse.What is an annular solar eclipse? A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun's light. During an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes, leaving a glowing ring of sunlight visible. An annular eclipse can only occur under specific conditions, NASA says. The moon must be in its first lunar phase, and it must also be farther away from Earth in its elliptical orbit, appearing smaller in the sky than it usually would.  Because the moon appears smaller under these circumstances, it cannot fully block out the sun, forming what's called a "ring of fire" or "ring of light."  "As the pair rises higher in the sky, the silhouette of the Moon will gradually shift...
    Last month's "super flower blood moon" lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. Next week brings an even bigger spectacle — a rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse. On June 10, skywatchers all over the world will be able to view the eclipse.What is an annular solar eclipse? A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun's light. During an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes, leaving a glowing ring of sunlight visible. An annular eclipse can only occur under specific conditions, NASA says. The moon must be in its first lunar phase, and it must also be farther away from Earth in its elliptical orbit, appearing smaller in the sky than it usually would.  Because the moon appears smaller under these circumstances, it cannot fully block out the sun, forming what's called a "ring of fire" or "ring of light."  "As the pair rises higher in the sky, the silhouette of the Moon will gradually shift...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Last month’s “super flower blood moon” lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. Next week brings an even bigger spectacle — a rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse. On June 10, skywatchers all over the world will be able to view the eclipse. READ MORE: Critter Concerns: Protecting Your Home From Unwanted Visitors What is an annular solar eclipse? A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun’s light. During an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes, leaving a glowing ring of sunlight visible. An annular eclipse can only occur under specific conditions, NASA says. The moon must be in its first lunar phase, and it must also be farther away from Earth in its elliptical orbit, appearing smaller in the sky than it usually would. Because the moon appears smaller under these circumstances, it cannot fully block out the sun, forming what’s called a “ring of fire” or “ring of light.” “As...
    Miami (CBSMiami) — Just a few weeks after May’s lunar eclipse, another very cool celestial event will take place on Thursday, June 10th, 2021. This time it will be a solar eclipse called the “ring of fire.” “This is such a blazing name that catches our attention, and we absolutely need an explanation for why this solar eclipse is named like this,” said CBS4 Meteorologist Jennifer Correa. READ MORE: Stimulus Check Update: Is A Fourth Relief Payment Coming For Americans? June 10th’s solar eclipse is called the “ring of fire” because it is an ‘annular solar eclipse.’ According to NASA, during an annular solar eclipse, the moon is positioned near or at apogee, which is the farthest point from Earth. At this point, the moon is so far away, it can’t block the entire sun during the solar eclipse. So a thin, fiery ring is exposed during an annular solar eclipse. This type of eclipse is different than a total solar eclipse in which the entire sun is blocked, and no bright light is visible. “It is important to point...
    Miami (CBSMiami) — Just a few weeks after May’s lunar eclipse, another very cool celestial event will take place on Thursday, June 10th, 2021. This time it will be a solar eclipse called the “ring of fire.” “This is such a blazing name that catches our attention, and we absolutely need an explanation for why this solar eclipse is named like this,” said CBS4 Meteorologist Jennifer Correa. READ MORE: Stimulus Check Update: Is A Fourth Relief Payment Coming For Americans? June 10th’s solar eclipse is called the “ring of fire” because it is an ‘annular solar eclipse.’ According to NASA, during an annular solar eclipse, the moon is positioned near or at apogee, which is the farthest point from Earth. At this point, the moon is so far away, it can’t block the entire sun during the solar eclipse. So a thin, fiery ring is exposed during an annular solar eclipse. This type of eclipse is different than a total solar eclipse in which the entire sun is blocked, and no bright light is visible. “It is important to point...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO/CBS News) — Last month’s “super flower blood moon” lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. Next week brings an even bigger spectacle — a rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse. On June 10, skywatchers all over the world will be able to view the eclipse. Though, as always, some places will be more ideal than others, and some will miss out entirely. READ MORE: Meteorological Summer Kicks Off With Hotter-Than-Average Temperatures The narrow path of the eclipse will be completely visible in parts of Canada, Greenland, the Arctic Ocean and Siberia. It will be partially visible for much of the rest of northeastern North America, Greenland, Northern Europe and northern Asia. From the Washington, D.C. area, the moon will block about 80% of the left side of the sun as they rise together in the east-northeast at 5:42 a.m. The sun will appear as a crescent during this time, NASA says. In Minnesota, WCCO director of meteorology Mike Augustyniak says that Minnesota is not likely to really see any effects from the event,...
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