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    A study published in the journal Climate Change on Tuesday suggests that U.S. emissions have been responsible for significant GDP percentages losses in lower-income countries. A study conducted by Dartmouth College shows the devastating economic effects major polluting countries like the U.S. have on the entire planet. According to the study, published in the journal Climate Change on Tuesday, the U.S. leads the world in emission-based gross domestic product losses for 143 countries between the years of 1990 and 2014, totaling $1.9 trillion. China was not far behind with worldwide GDP losses totaling just under $1.9 trillion. Grist noted that the two countries alone account for nearly one-third of GDP losses caused by emissions. The study authors themselves see this data as useful information to help countries impacted by large polluters like the U.S. pursue climate liability claims. “Greenhouse gases emitted in one country cause warming in another, and that warming can depress economic growth,” assistant professor Justin Mankin, who teaches geography and served as a senior researcher for the study, said in a press release. “This research provides legally valuable estimates of the...
    Arizona Representative Paul Gosar (R-AZ-04) co-signed a letter recently sent to the U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken (D) and President Joe Biden (D) that speaks against the Biden administration’s granting of funds to international organizations committed to the practice and spread of atheism and humanism. “Of course, we all know that America was founded largely by Christians who wanted to escape oppressive dictators and the State Church of England,” Gosar said in his weekly update letter. “Beginning in the 1960s, leftist activists posing as judges started to dismantle our Christian heritage and iconography. Crosses were ordered removed from parks. A prayer before school was limited then banned. The left did their best to remove our Christian culture from public life. I am working to reverse that cultural cleansing with others in Congress and to restore our Christian heritage.” Gosar said that on top of efforts to scrub away Christianity in America, the Left is “turning their attention to the rest of the world.” The letter Gosar co-signed, written by Indiana Rep. Jim Banks (R-IN-03), addresses a grant from the...
    Rajan Menon, War Is Hell (Even for Those Far from the Battlefield) I can’t help wondering: Did Joe Biden send his secretaries of defense and state to Kyiv recently to show just how totally “into” the war in Ukraine his administration is? So into it, in fact, that it’s hard to express (not in weaponry, perhaps, but in words). Still, Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin did make it clear enough that Washington’s objective in sending ever more weapons Kyiv’s way isn’t just to help defend the Ukrainians from a nightmarish aggression — not anymore. There’s a deeper purpose now at work — that being, as Austin put it, to ensure that Russia is eternally “weakened” by this war. In other words, the world is increasingly to be involved in a bad take two of the Cold War of the last century. And by the way, when it comes to actual diplomacy or negotiations, not a word was said in Kyiv, even with the secretary of state there. At a moment when the Biden administration seems to be doubling down on...
    "Members and supporters of the local Ukrainian community attend a protest in solidarity with Ukraine, in Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, on March 3, 2022." In a widely applauded move, the Biden administration last week designated Ukraine for Temporary Protected Status (TPS), extending vital relief to potentially 75,000 Ukrainians already in the U.S. Under the program, eligible applicants will be protected from returning to imminent harm for a period of 18 months. It’s a big relief for people like 62-year-old Iryna Volvach. She was visiting California when Russian dictator Vladimir Putin launched his brutal invasion of Ukraine. Volvach told the Associated Press that her family back home isn’t worried about her, because she’s here. But she’s certainly “worried about them.” The federal government has discretion under federal law to designate countries for temporary status when extraordinary conditions, such as armed conflict, make returns unsafe. 20-year-old Harvard University student Nika Rudenko told the AP that she’s looking at the program. She’s missed class in recent days, incredibly distraught over Russia’s invasion. But that could risk her student visa. Her family is currently in hiding.  “My mental state is not very stable and it’s just very difficult to...
    By Brenda Goodman, CNN (CNN) — The BA.2 virus — a subvariant of the Omicron coronavirus variant — isn’t just spreading faster than its distant cousin, it may also cause more severe disease and appears capable of thwarting some of the key weapons we have against Covid-19, new research suggests. New lab experiments from Japan show that BA.2 may have features that make it as capable of causing serious illness as older variants of Covid-19, including Delta. And like Omicron, it appears to largely escape the immunity created by vaccines. A booster shot restores protection, making illness after infection about 74% less likely. BA.2 is also resistant to some treatments, including sotrovimab, the monoclonal antibody that’s currently being used against Omicron. The findings were posted Wednesday as a preprint study on the bioRxiv server, before peer review. Normally, before a study is published in medical journal, it is scrutinized by independent experts. Preprints allow research to be shared more quickly, but they are posted before that additional layer of review. “It might be, from a human’s perspective, a worse...
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — The head of the World Health Organization’s Europe office said Tuesday that health officials are turning their attention to growing rates of COVID-19 infection in Eastern Europe, where six countries — including Russia and Ukraine — have seen a doubling in case counts over the last two weeks. Dr. Hans Kluge said the 53-country region, which stretches to former Soviet republics into central Asia, has now tallied more than 165 million confirmed coronavirus cases and 1.8 million deaths linked to the pandemic — including 25,000 in the last week alone. “Today, our focus is towards the east of the WHO European region,” Kluge said in Russian at a media briefing, pointing to a surge in the highly transmissible omicron variant. “Over the past two weeks, cases of COVID-19 have more than doubled in six countries in this part of the region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine).” “As anticipated, the omicron wave is moving east: 10 eastern Member States have now detected this variant,” he said. Omicron, however, is milder than previous variants...
    OMICRON has been reported in 89 countries and cases are doubling in one to three days in areas the World Health Organisation (WHO) warned today. WHO also warned the super mutant coronavirus was spreading rapidly in countries with high levels of population immunity — raising fears about how spreadable it is and the effectiveness of vaccines.  3Omicron is rapidly spreading throughout Europe and the worldCredit: Getty 3A passenger wearing a protective face mask waits to board a train at Gare de Lyon in ParisCredit: Getty The agency designated Omicron a variant of concern in November. 26, soon after it was first detected. Much is still not known about it, including the severity of the illness it causes. A statement from WHO read: “There is still limited data on the clinical severity of Omicron. "More data are needed to understand the severity profile and how severity is impacted by vaccination and pre-existing immunity." It added: "There is still limited available data, and no peer-reviewed evidence, on vaccine efficacy or effectiveness to date for Omicron." Meanwhile, French Prime Minister Jean Castex warned the...
    C says all he can see are tall buildings surrounding him. “It feels like I have escaped death, but now I am in a prison,” he told The Daily Beast through a translator. “I am in a boundary surrounded by four walls, not allowed to go anywhere.” C is 26, gay, originally from Kabul, and has been in a refugee camp for two and a half months, having escaped Afghanistan in September in fear for his life. C asks The Daily Beast to not use his real name. His family is still in Afghanistan, and he worries about both their rejection and what the Taliban would do to them if his identity was known. He also asks us not to name the refugee camp, or its location, as he fears for his own life and safety within the camp should his sexuality be discovered. C feels forgotten by America, and worried that he will be deported back to Afghanistan “where I fear I will be killed,” he told The Daily Beast. He is not alone. The advocacy organization Rainbow...
    U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres praised some initiatives but still said the efforts were "far from enough." Tomorrow marks the close of the climate summit COP26 and, with that, a final agreement—hopefully—adopted by all 197 parties who’ve helped draft the document. At its present stage, the agreement has already faced pushback from countries like Saudi Arabia and a coalition of nations known as the Like-Minded Developing Countries (LMDC), including China and India. Unsurprisingly, many countries that prioritize oil and gas’ profitability are reticent to phase out fossil fuels. For instance, LMDC takes issue with the entire mitigation section of the agreement, which explicitly calls for accelerated phasing out of “coal and subsidies for fossil fuels.” Though the group claims the section places an undue burden on developing countries, two of its 22 members are responsible for the world’s most and third-most carbon emissions. UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres doesn’t appear at all hopeful about what will be included in the final language of the agreement. Speaking with the Associated Press on Thursday, Guterres warned of a worst-case scenario of a watered-down agreement being adopted for the sake of...
    It took 1,458 flights and 1,117 buses and trains for Drew Binsky to reach his goal of traveling to every country in the world. And he did it in less than a decade. CNBC spoke with Binsky nine hours after he touched down in his last country — Saudi Arabia — about how he financed his 10-year travel spree.Visiting every country in the worldAccording to your tally, you've been to 197 countries. How do you define "country?" You're hitting me with a hard one right away. It's very political. The U.N. has 193 recognized sovereign states. I add four to that — Kosovo, Palestine, Taiwan and Vatican. Some of these are observer states of the U.N., and they are also the four most recognized of all the unrecognized "countries." I think I'm like the 250th person to visit every country. Is there a name for this group? The "every country" club. It's a small community, and I'm friends with maybe 20 of them. There's a lot of drama. It's like: "You actually haven't been to North Korea because you only went...
    The UN secretary-general accused countries of 'treating nature like a toilet' today as he warned of a looming 'climate catastrophe'. Antonio Guterres insisted it is an 'illusion' to think there has been enough progress reducing carbon emissions, and mining for coal, oil and gas is like 'digging our own graves'.  The startling comparison came in a speech opening the COP26 session for world leaders.  Mr Guterres said the world's 'addiction to fossil fuels is pushing humanity to the brink'. He told the opening plenary of the conference in Glasgow: 'We face a stark choice: either we stop it — or it stops us. Antonio Gutteres insisted it is an 'illusion' to think there has been enough progress reducing carbon emissions, and mining for fossil fuels is like 'digging our own graves' Mr Guterres greeted all 120 world leaders to the summit individually alongside Boris Johnson - and received a particularly effusive welcome from India's Narendra Modi   Mr Johnson and Sir David Attenborough were in the audience listening to speeches on the first day of the leaders' summit    RELATED ARTICLES...
    California's Los Angeles and Long Beach ports in San Pedro Bay - which move about 40 percent of shipped cargo entering the U.S. - are ranked among the worst in the world, falling behind third-world countries such as Kenya and Ghana. The Los Angeles port ranked 328 of the 351 ports listed in the World Bank and IHS Markit’s 2020 Container Port Performance Index. Its grade was worse than the port in Lome, Togo, which is among the world’s poorest countries. Long Beach’s port faired even worse, landing at the 333rd spot a few places behind Kenya’s Mombasa port. Both ports slide below the ranking of the Ghana's Tema port, listed in the 261st spot.  The poor rankings come as massive backlogs continue to disrupt the supply chain ahead of the holidays and threaten to continue the logjam into the 2022, and thousands of freight containers sit idly on more than 100 vessels that simply don't have anywhere to unload. Meanwhile, President Joe Biden said Thursday he is considering sending in the National Guard to alleviate supply chain issues and drive...
    Facebook announced on Thursday that it is creating an artificial intelligence capable of viewing and interacting with the outside world the same way a person can. Known as the Ego4D project, the AI project will take the technology to the next level and have it learn from 'videos from the center of action,' the social networking giant said in a blog post.  The project is comprised of 13 universities and has collected more than 2,200 hours of first-person video from 700 people. It is going to use video and audio from augmented reality and virtual reality devices like its Ray-Bans sunglasses, which were announced last month, or its Oculus VR headsets. Scroll down for video  Facebook is creating an artificial intelligence capable of viewing and interacting with the outside world the same way a person can The Ego4D project will let AI learn from 'videos from the center of action' 'AI that understands the world from this point of view could unlock a new era of immersive experiences, as devices like augmented reality (AR) glasses and virtual reality (VR) headsets...
    Tourists look at the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, Italy, on Aug. 25, 2021.Andrea Merola | Bloomberg | Getty Images The window to find dirt-cheap fares to Europe is closing. The Biden administration on Monday said the U.S. in November will start allowing vaccinated foreigners from 33 countries, including the U.K., China and EU nations, easing rules set early in the pandemic. That's great news for airlines that are desperate to drum up revenue after a historic lull in demand for routes that were among the most popular before the Covid-19 pandemic. Many EU countries have been welcoming U.S. tourists for months since vaccinations became widely available, but that was not reciprocated by the United States. "In the past, as restrictions have been eased, there has been an increase in bookings for travel, and we expect a similar reaction here," Conor Cunningham, executive director of MKM Partners, wrote in a research note to investors. Bargain hunters eager to take advantage of the relatively cheap flights might be out of luck as demand for trans-Atlantic travel rises. Round-trip flights to Europe,...
    On Friday’s “PBS NewsHour,” New York Times columnist David Brooks stated the U.S. is “betraying” those who helped us in Afghanistan “in the most shambolic way.” And that many view America’s handling of the situation as “what national decline looks like.” Brooks said Biden is handling the situation “very poorly. I thought the decision to leave was a mistake. I thought we had achieved some level of stability, and we could manage the problem. And I think we just invited the downfall. And the sad thing to me is, one of the good things that has happened in the Middle East over the last several years is that people have taken a look at the Taliban, and they hate it. A survey of eleven countries, Muslim countries, only 13% have positive views about the Taliban. In country after country, people are sickening of religious theocracy. Because they just find it doesn’t work, and that’s in Iran. That’s across the region. And so, at a time when liberal democracy is beginning to have a little momentum, and theocracy is taking some blows, we...
    DARK tourists such as Miles Routledge seeking thrills in terrifying war zones risk being banged up in hell-hole jails accused of espionage So-called "danger travel" has been thrust back into the spotlight after British national Miles, 22, claimed online that he is stuck in war-torn Kabul as ruthless Taliban militants seized the Afghani city. 7 Miles Routledge claims to be stranded in Kabul as the Taliban took back control of the cityCredit: facebook/Miles Le-vesconte Routledge 7 Jolie King was reportedly arrested and jailed in Iran in 2019 for flying a drone Miles alleges he has been abandoned by the British Embassy and told worried pals online: "I'm in a bit of a pickle." He claims he is now hiding out in a United Nations safehouse in Kabul after apparently trying to flee the capital several times, according to The Spectator. This comes hours after the Taliban took control of Jalalabad and means they now have seized every city in the country. On Sunday, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani fled after the jihadis stormed Kabul and seized his palace. Loughborough physics student...
    Nairobi, Kenya (CNN)Every time I see a call from home, my heart sinks. I always fear that they're ringing to say that my grandmother has died. She has been on a ventilator for four weeks and my anxiety is near breaking point. The dreaded call could come at any time: Covid-19. Again. Even at 96, my Kenyan grandmother was among hundreds of millions in the developing world who was not vaccinated until recently because rich nations have hoarded most of the available shots. Though I'm more than 60 years younger than her, I was fully inoculated by April because I was living in the United States, where anybody over 12 can get a vaccine if they want one.The acute shortage of doses for the world's poorest people has been called "vaccine apartheid," "greed" and a "catastrophic moral failure." Yet the public shaming has made little real difference, and Africa has received the fewest vaccines in the globe so far.Around half of all Americans are now fully vaccinated. Here in Kenya, that figure stands at just 1.1% of the population. While...
    Vaccine passports and other requirements may vary from country to country. Pavlo Gonchar/Getty Images; Getty Images; Thomas Pallini/Insider After a year with little international travel, some countries are reopening to tourists.  Insider rounded up the top tips to guide anyone who is ready to travel internationally. From vaccine passports to safety tips, traveling abroad may look different in this new normal. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. With coronavirus vaccinations ramping up across the globe, many Americans are thinking about international travel again. Traveling internationally has been taboo and in many cases off-limits since the coronavirus pandemic began in early 2020. But as countries reopen and more people get vaccinated, the dream of traveling internationally again is becoming more of a reality. To help guide you through the return to international travel, Insider compiled everything you need to know before you book a trip.Decide where you want to goThe world won't reopen all at once, and while some countries, like Iceland and Guatemala, are welcoming some visitors back, others, like Australia and New Zealand, are keeping their...
    Prayagraj, Uttar Pradesh, India: Beneficiaries in a long queue to receive a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre on Friday, May 21, 2021. Prabhat Kumar Verma/Zuma Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.The United States is slowly emerging from the onslaught of the pandemic, but in India, COVID-19 is raging. Bodies are washing up on the shores of the sacred Ganges river. Thousands of medical workers have died of the virus. The daily death toll, at more than 4,500, is now the highest in the world, surpassing the previous record set by the United States. That’s just the official count—the actual number of deaths is likely much higher. A particularly contagious variant now dominates, vaccines are still in short supply, and there is no end to this misery in sight. “India is a bellwether for other big outbreaks we’re going to see in other places all around the world.” As my colleague Sinduja Rangarajan recently wrote, India’s swiftly intensifying COVID crisis...
    BOULDER, Colo. (CBS4) – A young woman with an innovative mind is working to make education more accessible in developing countries by using 3D printers. The first school is set to be built in Madagascar in November of 2021. (credit: Thinking Huts) 21-year-old University of Colorado Boulder student Maggie Grout created her nonprofit Thinking Huts when she was just 15 years old. With more than 260 million children having no access to education worldwide, Grout knew she wanted to find a way to make education more accessible globally. READ MORE: Denver Weather: Very Warm And Then Very Wet This Weekend “I was adopted in China so I think that was really the root of it,” Grout explained. “I think that by providing an opportunity through education, you can really build something greater for yourself and then also be able to address the poverty issue as well through education.” Grout said the idea to use 3D printing to build schools is all thanks to a conversation with her dad. She quickly created partnerships with local organizations, like an architect...
    “Safe and efficient”. It was Thursday the conclusion of the European health authority on the vaccine developed against Covid-19 by the Swedish-British laboratory and the University of Oxford. The notice should have been a release. For days, this vaccine could no longer be used in several European countries, including France and Germany. All were worried about blood problems, sometimes fatal, in a few people who had received the vaccine. Germany, in particular, has noticed an abnormal proportion of cerebral venous thrombosis, which is particularly serious. The damage is done Is it related to the vaccine? It is neither proven nor excluded. Above all, even if this were the case, the problems are so rare – a few dozen out of millions of vaccinated – that it is hardly obvious to justify a general blockage. This is the message sent by the European regulator, then Friday by the World Health Organization (WHO), on a line widely shared in the world of public health. But, even if the vaccine was quickly relaunched in several countries including Germany, the Scandinavian countries prefer...
    The former Minister of Health and former Director of the Director of Health Systems of the WHO, Rafael Bengoa, has valued that, at the rate of vaccination in Spain against the coronavirus, the restrictions will continue this summer, so this year there will not be vacations like the old normality either. In an interview in Nius Diary, Bengoa has stated that “in summer we will not have enough vaccinated population and we will be far from the famous herd immunity that we need. “ In this sense, the former Obama adviser has assured that “we will continue to have to certain restrictions to mobility, to internal spaces, and so on. And that simply indicates that the vaccination obviously goes too slow to have this normal summer “. Likewise, Bengoa coincides with the warning of many other experts who are already warning that there will be a fourth wave of the virus in Spain. “I see it as very possible because it is beginning to happen in other countries,” he said. According to Bengoa, the increase in the cumulative incidence...
    Fight for vaccines shows that the idea of ​​”America first” persists. Photo: . / Mike Segar. (Bloomberg) – After failing to reach an agreement with Pfizer, Argentine President Alberto Fernández was so desperate for covid-19 vaccines that in December he sent a passenger plane to Moscow to search for doses of the Sputnik V vaccine. before the country’s own regulators had a chance to approve it. The approval for emergency use came hours before the Aerolineas Argentinas flight, with 300,000 Russian vaccines on board, landed at the Buenos Aires airport, amidst a great media uproar. Across the developing world, countries like Argentina have been displaced by wealthier nations in the race for vaccines produced by Western companies like Pfizer and Moderna. In most of Africa and large areas of Latin America, South Asia and Southeast Asia, few or no vaccines have been distributed, according to the Bloomberg Vaccine Tracker. He criticized but now he acts the same As candidate and later president, Joe Biden repudiated Donald Trump’s “America First” approach. But when it comes to vaccines, Biden is basically following...
    A couple strolls along a beach in Mallorca. (Photo: .) Rafael Bengoa, one of the most respected Public Health experts in Spain and who advised Barack Obama on health matters, has assured that it is very difficult for Spaniards to be able to have a normal summer this year. In an interview in Nius Diario, the expert regrets that in the summer months “we will not have enough vaccinated population”, so “we will be far from the famous herd immunity that we need.” “So the summer holidays are only going to be semi-freedom. We will continue to have certain restrictions on mobility, internal spaces, and so on. And that simply indicates that vaccination obviously goes too slow to have this normal summer, ”he insists. What’s more, Bengoa warns that it is most likely that we will soon see a fourth wave of the pandemic, something that he has said is already beginning to happen in countries such as Italy, the Czech Republic or Greece. “That tells us that countries around us that were intervening strongly against Covid-19, despite these restrictions,...
    New York : Today, he is one of the most recognized artists in Latin America when it comes to urban music; Nevertheless, J Balvin assures that although he fulfilled his mission of crossing borders with his songs, he would like to see that the industry of other countries also dares and thus a global musical culture can be created. In an interview for the program “60 Minutes”, the Colombian said he was proud for not having to abandon his mother tongue to make his songs successful in many countries around the world and confessed that, contrary to what everyone would think, this doesn’t make him feel like a superstar. “Many Latin artists are singing in English to make a crossover so that everyone in the world knows them and my goal is the opposite. I would like people from other countries to crossover to our world. I think I have shown that I don’t have to stop singing in Spanish to be a global star. “said J Balvin. The emotional part of the talk was when the interviewer asked...
    (CNN)How's life in countries where coronavirus vaccination is increasingly a success story? Meanwhile asked CNN's Lauren Kent about the UK, the first country in the world to start vaccinating citizens, and Sam Kiley about Israel, which leads the world in vaccination speed."A strong scent of marijuana drifts down the tight alleys of Jaffa's flea market," writes Kiley from Jaffa. "Drinking or dining in is out under Covid regulations. But 'deliveries' to clients in plastic chairs, using beer crates for tables on the uneven streets, mean beer and laughter flow with the easy joy of a summer festival. Jaffa, a neighborhood on the southern edge of Tel Aviv, prides itself on its ethnic mix of Jewish and Arab Israelis and its ability to make fun ... a commodity that's been in short supply through weeks of lockdown."As Covid regulations are now being partly lifted, no moment to wander the street, chat with friends and share a space with strangers is going to waste. Schools in areas not badly affected by the pandemic are opening. Traffic is back choking streets. And the...
    An American who spent a couple of years living in the UK has said the differences between the two countries is 'night and day.' Imgur user Chimichanga007 was born and raised in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and has lived in California, Chicago, New York City, New Jersey, and Connecticut. But after moving to the UK for work for a couple of years, he was shocked at the differences, admitting he now has 'survivor's guilt after experiencing living in a sane country compared to America'.  Differences: An American who spent a couple of years living in the UK has said the differences between the two countries is 'night and day' (stock image) Chimichanga007 shared the differences they observed on Imgur beneath a Confession Bear meme. 'I come from a poor family,' he wrote. 'I got the chance to live and work in the UK for a couple of years. Love it.' 'If you're not obscenely rich, UK is like a utopia compared to USA,' he went on. 'I don't hate. I want this for my country.' One major difference is that in the UK,...
    The billionaire businessman and founder of Microsoft, Bill Gates, assured this Thursday, February 18, that he has a neutral stance regarding bitcoin (BTC) and also made it clear that he has not invested in the cryptocurrency. During an interview with the US network CNBC, on the Squawk Box program, Gates said that he “had no bitcoin.” In addition, he clarified that he also does not trade short (betting that the price of BTC will fall), so he has opted for a “neutral view” on the cryptocurrency. The philanthropist was also consulted about the role that cryptocurrency plays in climate change, due to the energy that mining farms consume. However, he did not answer the question and instead referred to the payment tools that his foundation has developed in vulnerable countries. “Moving fiat money in a more digital way and reducing transaction costs is something the Gates Foundation does in developing countries,” he said. He also explained that the function of his foundation in those countries is to promote tools for make transactions that can be reversed for complete visibility of...
    Tawakkol Karman, Nobel Peace Prize 2011 Credit: PGL On December 17, 2010, a street fruit vendor named Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire, fed up with the abuse of authority and the repression he suffered daily in Tunisia. Died. But he never imagined that his act of protest and individual rebellion would unleash demonstrations in his country that would be replicated throughout the region, unleashing a social outbreak that caused political and social reforms, and the fall of several dictators. A revolt that became known as the « Arab Spring. » Bouazizi could never imagine, either, that women would assume a determining role during those historical events, led by Yemeni activist and journalist Tawakkol Karman, who advocated from non-violence for greater freedoms, rights and guarantees for all her compatriots and, in particular, for women. Less than a year after that emergence, Karman also became the first Arab woman, the second Muslim woman and, at the time of receiving him at just 32 years old, the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, giving him stature, global projection and protection, although even...
    The Week Trump is reportedly just going up to people and asking if they want a pardon President Trump has spent the last few days asking his friends, aides, and associates if they would like pardons — even those who are not facing any charges, a senior administration official told The Washington Post.In one case, the official said, Trump offered a pardon to a person who declined the chance at clemency, saying they weren’t in any legal trouble and hadn’t committed any crimes. “Trump’s response was, ‘Yeah, well, but you never know. They’re going to come after us all. Maybe it’s not a bad idea. Just let me know,'” the official recounted.Trump has taken a great interest in pardoning people, the Post reports, even calling families to personally let them know he granted a pardon. A person familiar with the matter told the Post that Trump was talked out of pardoning himself, family members, and controversial figures like Rudy Giuliani. An aide said there was also a brief discussion about possibly issuing pardons related to the Jan. 6 Capitol attack,...
    United Nations agencies are warning that more than 350 million people in the Asia-Pacific region are going hungry as the coronavirus pandemic destroys jobs and pushes food prices higher. The report issued Wednesday by four agencies says the pandemic is making it difficult for 1.9 billion people to afford healthy diets. It follows an earlier report that forecast that in a worst case scenario that 828 million people might suffer from acute hunger because of the crisis. The latest estimate is that nearly 688 million people globally are undernourished, more than half of them in Asia. The largest share is in South Asian countries like Afghanistan, where four in 10 people are malnourished. The report is mostly based on data up to 2019, before the pandemic struck. But it also estimates that an additional 140 million people were likely to have fallen into extreme poverty in 2020 due to the impact of virus outbreaks and lockdowns. By the end of last year, some 265 million were estimated to be facing acute food insecurity. A key factor...
    (CNN)Japan will ban foreign nationals from entering the country starting Monday through the end of January after several cases of the new Covid-19 variant were recorded in the country, according to Japan's public broadcaster, NHK. Japanese citizens and foreign residents can still enter, but they're required to self-quarantine for 14 days, NHK reported. Health officials brace for a surge in US Covid-19 cases after the holidaysThe move came after a new case of Covid-19 variant was confirmed on Saturday on a person who recently returned from the UK, NHK said. Five other travelers from Britain were also detected with the variant the previous day.The new coronavirus variant is said to have originated in the UK and be potentially more transmissible. Since its discovery, more than 40 countries have restricted travel from the UK, and in some cases, travel from other countries that have documented cases with the variant.Read MoreBeginning Monday, for instance, the US will require all travelers from the UK to receive a negative Covid-19 test within 72 hours of boarding a flight to the US. Passengers will also...
    Pupils wait in line outside the school premises before classes resume in the Tembisa township, Ekurhuleni, on June 8, 2020. As South Africa confronts a second wave of Covid-19 infections, scientists say new evidence indicates that at least a quarter of the country’s population – and possibly more than a third – may already have been infected by the virus during its first wave, which peaked in July. South Africa’s unusually high infection rate – potentially far higher than in some European nations after their first waves – appears to have been accompanied by an uncommonly low death rate, with early data from one province suggesting that the Covid-19 mortality rate was less than half that experienced in the worst-hit countries. Scientists warn that their preliminary figures could go up or down as more data becomes available in the coming weeks. A total of 19,000 people will be involved in a string of nationwide surveys. Experts also note the risks involved in trying to extrapolate from one country to the rest of a continent. But, if confirmed, these findings...
    Srdja Popovic is a Serbian expert on contested elections and nonviolent struggle.Courtesy of Srdja Popovic Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.He’s been called “the secret architect of global revolution” (by the Guardian) and a “nonviolent storm trooper” (in the pages of our magazine). Now, after two decades traveling the world training pro-democracy activists in more than 50 countries, Serbian revolutionary Srdja Popovic finds himself in the United States, where he’s teaching strategic nonviolent struggle to students at Colorado College. Upon arriving here not long before the election, Popovic was struck by the deluge of headlines questioning whether the upcoming presidential race would be free and fair, which he found eerie but unsurprising.  “Some people get haunted by ex-lovers, or scary movies, or ghosts,” he told me shortly before the election, in an edifying and hilarious video chat. “What haunts me is the spirit of the disputed election.”  Popovic first tasted the “narcotic collectivism” of movement-building while studying ecology in Belgrade. When Serbia’s autocratic...
    Google Assistant is now available on Samsung’s 2020 TVs in the UK, France, Germany, and Italy, and will be available in 12 countries by the end of the year, Samsung has announced. This follows the launch of Google’s voice assistant on Samsung’s TVs in the US last month. Samsung says it’ll roll out in Spain, Brazil, India and South Korea by late November. The voice assistant is available alongside Amazon’s Alexa and Samsung’s own Bixby voice assistants. According to Samsung, Google’s voice assistant can be used to control the TV directly with commands like changing channels or adjusting the volume, or else it can control other Google Assistant-compatible smart home devices like thermostats or lights. You can also ask it for information on the weather or to play music, and it integrates with other Google services like Search, Photos, Maps, and Calendar. Samsung’s 2019 TVs previously integrated with Google Assistant, but back then users had to give their commands via a separate device equipped with the voice assistant like a Google Home smart speaker. With the new models, however, users...
    The University of Michigan (U-M) released a gloomy report about growing Internet censorship on Tuesday, warning that even countries with high liberty ratings from human rights advocates like Freedom House are censoring Internet content with increasingly heavy hands. Even the famously “nice” Scandinavian nations like Norway, regarded as the freest country in the world, have moved to “extremely aggressive” controls on a wide range of content. According to the “Censored Planet” monitoring tool employed by the U-M, Norway is blocking content from human rights websites such as Human Rights Watch, in addition to tighter controls over material such as online gambling and pornography. Censored Planet is a complex system that constantly and automatically scans the Internet for blocked websites and the denial of information requests. The team that developed the system released technical details of its operation along with their new white paper on Internet freedom. The designers said it was important to use an automated system to search the entire Internet for blocks and blacklists because human researchers tend to be “focused on countries already known for censorship,...
    A British university student originally from Brighton, England has been attending university in the US — and sharing some of her funny experiences and the things she's learned on TikTok video. Alyssa Feary is one of about 7,000 students at Georgia College & State University in Milledgeville, Georgia, near where her dad lives, and her time in the US — and the deep south in particular — has been enlightening. In a video that's been watched half a million times, Alyssa shares some of her thoughts, including that southerners say 'y'all' too much and that Americans have a misconception that there is one single British accent. Scroll down for video  Fish out of water: Alyssa Feary is from Brighton, England and attends university in Georgia @alyssafeary What it¿s like going to a college in America being English ##british ##college ##fyp ¿ original sound - Alyssa Feary 'So I go to a college in Georgia,' she says in the video. 'I'm English and I have a little list of things that I have learned while going to college here.'  'Americans can't comprehend...
    A few days ago I suffered through some kind of terrible stomach bug. Then I got better. Then I got another one. What’s going on? In any case, I feel horrible, which is why today’s charts are so late. Also too, there’s a wildfire raging about ten miles north of me, helped along by hurricane level Santa Ana winds, and if you go outside it smells like a barbecue and looks like Armageddon. Nevertheless, here’s the coronavirus death toll through October 25. The raw data from Johns Hopkins is here.
    FRENCH products are being boycotted in Muslim countries after Emmanuel Macron defended the right to show cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed. Already luxury beauty products made by L’Oreal and Garnier have been stripped from the shelves after the French president’s comments. 6Empty shelves are seen where French products were displayed in KuwaitCredit: Reuters 6Kuwaitis lift a placard expressing anger at French President Emmanuel MacronCredit: AFP or licensors 6Garnier is among the French brands being targetted Credit: Reuters Macron was speaking in the wake the murder of teacher Samuel Paty, who was beheaded by 18-year-old Abdullah Anzorov on October 17. The 47-year-old teacher was posthumously given the Legion d'Honneur - France’s highest award - and Macron insisted the country would "not give up our cartoons". Depictions of the Prophet Muhammad are regarded as taboo in Islam and are offensive to Muslims. Macron’s comment have led Kuwait’s Union of Consumer Co-operative Societies supermarket group to issue an order to boycott French products. Several of its stores had cleared the shelves of items such as hair and beauty products made by French companies. Union head...
    Tokyo, Japan. Toru Hanai In some parts of the world, students have to overcome challenging circumstances such as war, political unrest, and poverty to attend school. The power of learning can help kids worldwide reach their full potential.  Ahead of World Teachers' Day on October 5, Insider looked at what classrooms are like around the world, pre-pandemic. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Nobel Prize winner and author Malala Yousafzai wrote, "One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world." In some parts of the world, students have to overcome challenging circumstances to even get to class amid war, political unrest, and poverty, while others simply hop on a yellow school bus that stops on their suburban corner. In addition, worldwide, students and teachers alike are grappling with remote learning and socially distanced classroom setups due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the differences between cramped classrooms without electricity and private institutions with pressed uniforms, the power of learning can help kids all over the world reach their full potential.  Here's what school looked like in 20 different...
    President Trump outlined how he would address environmental concerns and sounded the alarm about getting the US involved in global climate deals because they blunt the country’s competitive edge. The president was asked about climate change because of the wildfires in California during an interview on “Fox & Friends” Tuesday. He said the fires could be curbed using controlled burns and clearing the forest ground of combustible materials, pointing to European forest management, and adding that he has discussed the strategy with California Governor Gavin Newsom. “Look around you have forests as all over the world, you don’t have fires like you do in California. In Europe they have forest cities. You look at countries, Austria, you look at so many countries, they live in the forest. They’re considered forest cities – so many of them, and they don’t have fires like this, and they have more explosive trees. They have trees that will catch easier. But they maintain their fire. They have an expression they ‘thin the fuel.’ The fuel is what’s on the ground – the leaves, the...
    VIDEO5:1305:13These overseas ETFs could be good pandemic-proof bets, CEO saysETF Edge Trading the Covid-19 curve can prove challenging. With global case counts still rising, investors should consider buying into countries that have gotten a better handle on the virus than others, ETF Trends CEO Tom Lydon told CNBC's "ETF Edge" on Monday. "Take Europe," Lydon said. "Areas like Italy are not doing well with the coronavirus and their markets aren't doing well. [In] contrast, northern Europe, the Nordic regions, are actually doing really well." The iShares MSCI Denmark ETF (EDEN), for one, is up nearly 18% year to date. That fund is heavily weighted toward health-care and industrial stocks, with pharmaceutical play Novo Nordisk accounting for more than 18% of the portfolio. The Global X FTSE Nordic ETF (GXF), which has exposure to Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Norway, is also in the green for 2020, up almost 10%. For comparison, the broader Vanguard FTSE Europe ETF (VGK) is underperforming, down about 9% for the year. Zoom In IconArrows pointing outwards On the other side of the world, China's recovery has...
    Widespread coronavirus testing and lockdown measures have not helped some countries reduce deaths caused by the virus, according to research from the medical journal The Lancet. Scientists in Canada, Greece and a U.S. institution in Texas poured over public data for 50 countries and their health authorities, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). They concluded that actions taken by the governments -- such as border closures, stay-at-home orders and testing -- “were not associated with statistically significant reductions in the number of critical cases or overall mortality,” contrary to prevailing policies in the U.S. and elsewhere, according to researchers. CONFIRMED CORONAVIRUS CASES IN THE US TOP 4 MILLION VideoINDIANA AG SAYS GOVERNOR HAS OVERSTEPPED IN STATEWIDE CORONAVIRUS MASK MANDATE “Although containment measures implemented in countries like China, South Korea and Taiwan have reduced new cases by more than 90 percent, this has not been the case in many other countries such as Italy, Spain and the United States,” the report said. The data did not explicitly state why lockdowns and testing didn't result in lower death rates,...
    SWEDEN’S coronavirus death rate is soaring past America’s to rate among the world’s worst as experts warns “don't do what we did” and dodge a national lockdown. But their stinging criticism flies in the face of Sweden’s top epidemiologist who swears the virus is waning, and the country’s strategy is working. 6No sign of social distancing in Drottninggatan during rush hour in Stockholm, amid the coronavirus coronavirusCredit: AFP or licensors Twenty-five Swedish doctors and scientists write that "motives for the Swedish Public Health Agency's light-touch approach are somewhat of a mystery". In a no holds barred opinion piece for USA Today, they warned of "an unwillingness to admit early mistakes and take responsibility for thousands of unnecessary deaths. "At the moment, we have set an example for the rest of the world on how not to deal with a deadly infectious disease." Criticising Sweden's infamous soft approach to the pandemic, lack of national lockdown, and bid for herd immunity, they said: "The strategy has led to death, grief and suffering. "And on top of that there are no indications that...
    AIR bridges to low-coronavirus-regions in banned countries could be introduced later this year by the government. Travelling to destinations such as Portugal and the US is currently banned by the government as both countries report spikes in cases or high coronavirus infections. 2Regions in Portugal could be back on the menu with 'localised' air bridge plansCredit: Alamy However, the new bridges could link the UK to certain regions which have lower cases - such as to Madeira and the Azores while avoiding Lisbon. While many states in the US are also facing record high daily infections, some states with lower cases could also be included in the plans. West Virginia, along with Oregon and Utah have less than 10 deaths per 100,000 people. A source told The Telegraph: "Regional air bridges are an option for countries with localised outbreaks.  "The US is a major issue. If you judge it nationally, the absence of travel could go on for months, which is where individual testing of arrivals could work." 2High infection rates in the US mean travel is banned, but some...
    Geneva, Jul 10 (EFE) .- The World Health Organization (WHO) warned today about the decision of some countries, such as Mexico and others in America, to reopen their economies despite maintaining high daily numbers of COVID-19 infections. , and stressed that this can have very negative consequences for their public health. “The blind reopening, regardless of the data, could lead to situations that nobody wants,” said WHO Executive Director for Health Emergencies, Mike Ryan, when asked by Mexico, which has initiated measures of unconfinement despite report in recent days more than 6,000 new infections. The Irish expert admitted that confinement measures in many countries have had harsh economic consequences for many families “and we fully understand the pressure that some governments are undergoing” but recommended seeking a balance between containing the coronavirus and reopening activities. “Reopening in moments of intense community transmission leads to difficult situations that can affect an entire country” and push its health system to the limit, he warned. Mexico is currently the fifth country in the world with the most deaths from COVID-19 (more than 32,000),...
    Prior to becoming the host of my own show on Fox News Radio I spent the better part of my adult life as a cab driver in New York City. I know what you're thinking: how does a guy go from taxi driver to radio host? One job spends all day surrounded by a bunch of bottom-feeding crazy people, and the other is taxi driving. I’m not entirely sure how I was able to make the jump, but one of the main reasons why was because I live in the greatest country in the world, a place where everyone has the freedom to work as hard as they want to go as far as they want. A place where your attitude truly defines your experience in life, regardless of color or creed. I heard this a lot as a kid but it didn’t register until it was explained to me by a Nigerian-born cabbie we called “Big O,” who was one of a hundred drivers in my garage who’d immigrated here from around the world. Men and women who’d...
    Here is the letter that King Philippe sent to the Congolese president, Félix Tshisekedi, as part of the 60th anniversary of the independence of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The sovereign expresses “deep regrets” there. “On this sixtieth anniversary of the independence of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, I extend my warmest wishes to you and to the Congolese people. This anniversary is an opportunity to renew our feelings of deep friendship and to rejoice in the intense cooperation that exists between our two countries in so many fields, and especially in the medical field, which mobilizes us during this pandemic period. The health crisis strikes us amidst other concerns. The privileged partnership between Belgium and Congo is an asset to face it. On this national holiday, I wish to reaffirm our commitment by your side. To further strengthen our ties and develop an even more fruitful friendship, we must be able to speak of our long common history in all truth and serenity. Our history is made of common achievements but has also experienced painful episodes....
    President Donald Trump has reiterated that it may only look like the United States has substantially more coronavirus cases than other countries because there is more testing. Trump's trade adviser had earlier insisted the American leader was only joking when he urged his admin to slow down on the testing during a rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma on Saturday. It was after he claimed the the US topping the infection rate tables was simply down to carrying out more tests. But on Sunday, Trump tweeted defending the fact that the US rate of COVID-19 the country reached 2,279,879 infections and 119,969 deaths. 'Our Coronavirus testing is so much greater (25 million tests) and so much more advanced, that it makes us look like we have more cases, especially proportionally, than other countries,' Trump tweeted just before 1am on Monday. 'My message on that is very clear!' President Trump on Sunday doubled down on why coronavirus cases are highest in the US Trump tweeted defending the high number and said his previous message was 'very clear' It was after reported COVID-19...
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