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    By: KDKA-TV’s Erika Stanish PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention unanimously voted to recommend the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 booster shots to all adults Friday. READ MORE: Man Dies From Injuries After Truck Falls On HimIt’s happening at the right time, according to health officials, who say hospitalizations among those fully vaccinated are on the rise. CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said this week during a press briefing that COVID-19 hospitalizations have been increasing nationwide among those 65 and older. The age group was among the first to receive a COVID-19 vaccine last winter. “Although the highest risks are those people who are unvaccinated, we are seeing an increase in emergency department visits among adults aged 65 and older, which are now again higher than they are for younger age groups,” Walensky said. Walensky said there’s been a decline in vaccine effectiveness, specifically among the elderly. She said in order to lower hospitalizations, boosters are proving to work. “The rate of disease is markedly lower for those who received their booster...
    (CNN) — The Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines were found in the real world to be 94% effective against Covid-19 hospitalization among fully vaccinated adults ages 65 and older in the United States, according to a new US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. The study also found that the vaccines were 64% effective among those older adults who were partially vaccinated, meaning they had only received one dose of vaccine so far. READ MORE: State Aims To Tackle Education Achievement Gap For Black Boys These findings are consistent with the vaccines’ clinical trial results, which showed an efficacy of about 94% to 95%, researchers from the CDC and several other institutions noted. “These data suggest that continuing to rapidly vaccinate U.S. adults against COVID-19 will likely have a marked impact on COVID-19 hospitalization and might lead to commensurate reductions in post-COVID conditions and deaths,” the researchers wrote in their study. The study included data on 417 adults ages 65 and older with Covid-19-like symptoms who were admitted to 24 hospitals in 14 states between January 1 and March...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS/CNN) — The Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines were found in the real world to be 94% effective against COVID-19 hospitalization among fully vaccinated adults ages 65 and older in the United States, according to a new US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. It was released Wednesday as Philadelphia officials said about 4,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine are in danger of going to waste at FEMA’s mass vaccination site at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The study also found that the vaccines were 64% effective among those older adults who were partially vaccinated, meaning they had only received one dose of vaccine so far. READ MORE: Family Of Lymond Moses Announces Lawsuit Against New Castle County, Police Department These findings are consistent with the vaccines’ clinical trial results, which showed an efficacy of about 94% to 95%, researchers from the CDC and several other institutions noted. “These data suggest that continuing to rapidly vaccinate U.S. adults against COVID-19 will likely have a marked impact on COVID-19 hospitalization and might lead to commensurate reductions in post-COVID conditions and...
    By Jacqueline Howard | CNN The Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines were found in the real world to be 94% effective against Covid-19 hospitalization among fully vaccinated adults ages 65 and older in the United States, according to a new US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. The study also found that the vaccines were 64% effective among those older adults who were partially vaccinated, meaning they had only received one dose of vaccine so far. These findings are consistent with the vaccines’ clinical trial results, which showed an efficacy of about 94% to 95%, researchers from the CDC and several other institutions noted. “These data suggest that continuing to rapidly vaccinate U.S. adults against COVID-19 will likely have a marked impact on COVID-19 hospitalization and might lead to commensurate reductions in post-COVID conditions and deaths,” the researchers wrote in their study. The study included data on 417 adults ages 65 and older with Covid-19-like symptoms who were admitted to 24 hospitals in 14 states between January 1 and March 26. Among those patients, 187 tested positive for the...
    A small study of older Americans fully vaccinated with Pfizer or Moderna jabs suggested they dropped their risk of COVID-19 hospitalization by 94%, compared to an unvaccinated group of the same age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Partially vaccinated patients (two weeks post-first dose) cut their hospitalization risk by 64%, per results said to be the first real-world findings in the U.S. indicating mRNA vaccines protect against severe illness, on par with clinical trials. "The findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 vaccines can reduce the risk for COVID-19–associated hospitalization and, as a consequence of preventing severe COVID-19, vaccination might have an impact on post-COVID conditions (e.g., "long COVID") and deaths," CDC researchers wrote. CORONAVIRUS HOSPITALIZATIONS TUMBLE AMONG US SENIORS Findings posted Wednesday drew from 417 patients over age 65, including 230 controls who tested negative for the virus and 187 patients who tested positive, spanning 24 hospitals in over a dozen states. More specifically, among the virus-positive patients, 10% were partially vaccinated before symptoms occurred, compared with 27% of control patients who were at least partially vaccinated. The proportion of the vaccines...
    (CNN) — The Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines were found in the real world to be 94% effective against Covid-19 hospitalization among fully vaccinated adults ages 65 and older in the United States, according to a new US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. The study also found that the vaccines were 64% effective among those older adults who were partially vaccinated, meaning they had only received one dose of vaccine so far. READ MORE: Child Tax Credit: How Much Money Can Parents Expect In Monthly Payments? These findings are consistent with the vaccines’ clinical trial results, which showed an efficacy of about 94% to 95%, researchers from the CDC and several other institutions noted. “These data suggest that continuing to rapidly vaccinate U.S. adults against COVID-19 will likely have a marked impact on COVID-19 hospitalization and might lead to commensurate reductions in post-COVID conditions and deaths,” the researchers wrote in their study. The study included data on 417 adults ages 65 and older with Covid-19-like symptoms who were admitted to 24 hospitals in 14 states between January 1...
    A new study indicated adults over age 65 face a higher risk of coronavirus reinfection, possibly due to weaker immune systems, though the overall incidence remains rare at less than 1%. Findings published in The Lancet on Wednesday drew from over 525,000 people in Denmark available for follow-up after two infection surges; the first occurring in spring 2020 and the second surging from September to December 2020. PAUSING ASTRAZENECA COVID-19 JABS LEAVES SOME DOCS DIVIDED Researchers from the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen determined reinfection risk through an analysis of PCR test data from the Danish Microbiology Database, and excluded about 600 people who tested positive for the first time and over 7,400 deaths from all causes. The team found that 72 of 11,068 people who tested positive during the spring-time surge went on to test positive again, which translates to a 0.65% reinfection rate. Further, adults over age 65 saw a 47% "observed protection against repeat infection" compared to nearly 80% protection among younger age groups. Researchers found no difference in reinfection risk between the sexes, nor waning protection after over seven months of...
    The AstraZeneca-University of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine has created immune responses in young and old adults, a promising sign that the shot could provide protection from the coronavirus. The shot, now in late-stage human trials, also triggered lower adverse responses among the elderly, the sector of the population most vulnerable to serious illness. The company said in an announcement Monday that is likely to boost hopes that a COVID-19 vaccine is right around the corner. AstraZeneca has not replied to the Washington Examiner’s request for comment. AstraZeneca just resumed clinical trials of its vaccine candidate developed with the University of Oxford last week after pausing the study last month when a volunteer in the United Kingdom developed a neurological illness. The Food and Drug Administration concluded Friday that the vaccine was not the cause of the neurological effects and told the company that it could resume enrolling volunteers for the clinical trials already in advanced stages. Federal health officials have predicted conflicting timelines for widespread inoculations. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said last week...
    A COVID-19 vaccine being developed by Oxford University that is considered a frontrunner in the race for an inoculation against the deadly bug produces a similar immune response among older and younger adults, UK drug maker AstraZeneca said Monday. The vaccine’s adverse reactions also were lower among the elderly, the company said, according to Reuters. “It is encouraging to see immunogenicity responses were similar between older and younger adults and that reactogenicity was lower in older adults, where the COVID-19 disease severity is higher,” an AstraZeneca spokesman told the news outlet. “The results further build the body of evidence for the safety and immunogenicity of AZD1222,” the rep added, using the scientific name of the vaccine. News that older adults get an immune response is encouraging because the immune system weakens with age and older people are those who are most at risk of dying from the disease. The Financial Times has reported that the vaccine — being developed by Oxford and AstraZeneca — triggers protective antibodies and T-cells among older people, according to Reuters. Immunogenicity blood tests performed...
    A COVID-19 vaccine being developed by Oxford University that is considered a frontrunner in the race for an inoculation against the deadly bug produces a similar immune response among older and younger adults, UK drug maker AstraZeneca said Monday. The vaccine’s adverse reactions also were lower among the elderly, the company said, according to Reuters. “It is encouraging to see immunogenicity responses were similar between older and younger adults and that reactogenicity was lower in older adults, where the COVID-19 disease severity is higher,” an AstraZeneca spokesman told the news outlet. “The results further build the body of evidence for the safety and immunogenicity of AZD1222,” the rep added, using the scientific name of the vaccine. News that older adults get an immune response is encouraging because the immune system weakens with age and older people are those who are most at risk of dying from the disease. The Financial Times has reported that the vaccine — being developed by Oxford and AstraZeneca — triggers protective antibodies and T-cells among older people, according to Reuters. see also US...
    A test tube labelled vaccine is seen in front of AstraZeneca logo in this illustration taken, September 9, 2020.Dado Ruvic | Reuters LONDON — British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca on Monday reportedly said its potential Covid-19 vaccine had produced a similar immune response in both older and younger adults. Adverse responses to the vaccine among the elderly — the age group at highest risk from the coronavirus — were also found to be lower, AstraZeneca told Reuters. The drugmaker's potential Covid-19 vaccine is being developed in collaboration with the University of Oxford. The announcement is likely to boost hopes of a Covid vaccine being developed before the end of the year. "It is encouraging to see immunogenicity responses were similar between older and younger adults and that reactogenicity was lower in older adults, where the COVID-19 disease severity is higher," an AstraZeneca spokesman told Reuters on Monday. "The results further build the body of evidence for the safety and immunogenicity of AZD1222," the spokesman said, referring to the technical name of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. AstraZeneca was not immediately available for comment...
    NEW YORK CITY -- Coronavirus cases are climbing rapidly among young adults in a number of states where bars, stores and restaurants have reopened - a disturbing generational shift that not only puts them in greater peril than many realize but poses an even bigger danger to older people who cross their paths.In Oxford, Mississippi, summer fraternity parties sparked outbreaks. In Oklahoma City, church activities, fitness classes, weddings and funerals seeded infections among people in their 20s, 30s and 40s. In Iowa college towns, surges followed the reopening of bars. A cluster of hangouts near Louisiana State University led to at least 100 customers and employees testing positive. In East Lansing, Michigan, an outbreak tied to a brew pub spread to 34 people ages 18 to 23.There and in states like Florida, Texas and Arizona, young people have started going out again, many without masks, in what health experts see as irresponsible behavior."The virus hasn't changed. We have changed our behaviors," said Ali Mokdad, professor of health metrics sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. "Younger people are more...
    By CARLA K. JOHNSON and TAMARA LUSH ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Coronavirus cases are climbing rapidly among young adults in a number of states where bars, stores and restaurants have reopened — a disturbing generational shift that not only puts them in greater peril than many realize but poses an even bigger danger to older people who cross their paths. In Oxford, Mississippi, summer fraternity parties sparked outbreaks. In Oklahoma City, church activities, fitness classes, weddings and funerals seeded infections among people in their 20s, 30s and 40s. In Iowa college towns, surges followed the reopening of bars. A cluster of hangouts near Louisiana State University led to at least 100 customers and employees testing positive. In East Lansing, Michigan, an outbreak tied to a brew pub spread to 34 people ages 18 to 23. There and in states like Florida, Texas and Arizona, young people have started going out again, many without masks, in what health experts see as irresponsible behavior. “The virus hasn’t changed. We have changed our behaviors,” said Ali Mokdad, professor of health metrics sciences...
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