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    DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Floods in Bangladesh continued to wreak havoc Monday with authorities struggling to ferry drinking water and dry food to flood shelters across the country’s vast northern and northeastern regions, officials and local media said. More than a dozen people died across the country since the monsoon began last week, authorities said. The government called in soldiers Friday to help evacuate people. Ekattor TV station said millions remained without electricity. Enamur Rahman, junior minister for disaster and relief, said that up to 100,000 people have been evacuated in the worst-hit Sunamganj and Sylhet districts, and about 4 million people have been marooned in the area, the United News of Bangladesh agency said. In the latest statement Sunday from the country’s Flood Forecasting and Warning Center in the nation’s capital, Dhaka, said that flooding in the northeastern districts of Sunamganj and Sylhet could worsen further in next 24 hours. It said the Teesta, a major river in the northern Bangladesh, may flow above danger. The situation could also deteriorate in the country’s northern districts of...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Grass in office parks, on college campuses or in some California neighborhoods will go brown this summer after state water officials adopted a ban Tuesday on watering certain green spaces as the state’s drought drags on. The ban adopted by the State Water Resources Control Board follows Gov. Gavin Newsom’s plea for Californians to use less water or face broad, mandatory restrictions on water use. The board also voted to require local water districts to adopt stricter conservation measures, though they are locally designed to meet different community needs. Many of those rules place further limits on how often people can water their yards. “The governor made very clear yesterday that there is a sense of urgency here,” said E. Joaquin Esquivel, chairman of the water board. California is in its third year of an acute drought, part of a two-decade megadrought facing the U.S. West that scientists say is the worst in 1,200 years. Hotter temperatures are also exacerbating the state’s water challenges as people have started to water their lawns earlier than normal....
    SACRAMENTO (AP/CBS13) – Gov. Gavin Newsom threatened Monday to impose mandatory water restrictions if Californians don’t use less on their own as a drought drags on and the hotter summer months approach. Newsom raised that possibility in a meeting with representatives from major water agencies, including those that supply Los Angeles, San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area, his office said in a press release. The Democratic governor has avoided issuing sweeping, mandatory cuts in water use and instead favored an approach that gives local water agencies power to set rules for water use in the cities and towns they supply. READ MORE: Cousins From Ceres Killed In Modesto Rollover CrashJanuary through March typically is when most of California’s annual rain and snow falls, but this year those months were the driest in at least a century. Despite calls for conservation, the state’s water use went up dramatically in March – 19% compared to the same month in 2020 – and now Newsom is considering changing his approach. “Every water agency across the state needs to take more aggressive...
    FELTON — The CZU August Lightning Complex fire continues to impact Santa Cruz County water reliability more than one and a half years after the fire erupted, but some customers are getting closer to relief. On Thursday, the San Lorenzo Valley Water District Board of Directors accepted a legal document during a meeting that further solidifies a consolidation between the purveyor and two small community water systems that suffered serious fire damage. Big Basin Water Co. was particularly hard hit in the blaze, losing nearly all its crucial water infrastructure. The company has served some 500 customers off of a single well as result, meaning erratic water service and weeks-long outages. The San Lorenzo Valley Water District also suffered serious damage, with nearly all of its surface water sources burning, but the purveyor has wider access to aquifer sources and more manpower to provide reliable drinking water. On Nov. 10, 2021 — a week after the Sentinel published a second investigation on Big Basin Water and the lengths customers had to go to in order to get clean drinking water...
    California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that the state had reached broad agreement with rural water districts on a voluntary framework for conserving water in the Central Valley, potentially bringing years of disputes to a conclusion. As Breitbart News reported in 2018, the California’s State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) had approved the controversial Bay-Delta Plan to allocate more water to environmental uses in an attempt to stabilize fish populations. That plan short-circuited ongoing negotiations between the state and rural water districts that supply farms and communities in the Central Valley, leading to more lawsuits that have become the costly battleground on which water disputes are fought. But the “memorandum of understanding” released by the governor’s office could move those disputes out of court, based on a commitment by the water districts to give up a limited amount of water and invest in the restoration of local fish habitats. The Sacramento Bee reported: Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration unveiled a $2.6 billion environmental peace treaty on the Central Valley’s overtaxed rivers Tuesday. The deal calls for farms and cities to surrender billions of...
    ORINDA (KPIX) – The total rain collected as of February is still above normal, according to East Bay Municipal Utility District, but the recent dry spell in 2022 contrasts sharply with the wet months late last year and leaves the potential for a drought emergency uncertain. “We’re not seeing an erasure of what occurred but it is worrisome,” said Andrea Pook, a spokesperson for East Bay MUD. “We do still need to wait and see what we get for the rest of February and into March.” READ MORE: Cost Of Fruits And Vegetables Increases Sharply In Bay Area, U.S.As of this week, East Bay MUD says it has 30 inches of rain, which is 108 percent of normal for this time of year. It’s also more rain that we had last year. Reservoirs are 68 percent full. These numbers are improvements from data reported by the agency in December. “Well it’s too bad because you know we really need the rain and I love to ski but this is a great alternative to skiing,” said Steve Maupin, an...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Last month's wet winter storms led California officials on Thursday to announce they'll release more water than initially planned from state storage to local agencies that provide water for 27 million people and vast swaths of farmland.The Department of Water Resources now plans to give water districts 15% of what they've requested for 2022. That's up from last month, when the state said it would supply 0% of requested water beyond what was needed for necessities such as drinking and bathing. It was the first time ever the state issued an initial water allocation of nothing.State officials stressed California's drought is far from over and urged people to keep conserving water. But December storms that dumped heavy snow in the mountains and partially refilled parched reservoirs have provided some relief from what had been an exceptionally dry year.Still, the state hasn't seen a major storm yet this month, and most state reservoirs remain below their historic averages. The U.S. Drought Monitor shows much of California remains in severe drought."Dry conditions have already returned in January. Californians must...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP/CBS13) — A wet and snowy December in California led state officials on Thursday to announce they’ll release more water than initially planned from state storage to local agencies that provide water for 27 million people and vast swaths of farmland. The Department of Water Resources now plans to give water districts 15% of what they’ve requested for 2022. That’s up from last month, when the state said it would supply 0% of requested water beyond what was needed for necessities such as drinking and bathing. It was the first time ever the state issued an initial water allocation of nothing. READ MORE: Coroner Identifies North Highlands Homeowner Shot Dead During BurglaryState officials stressed California’s drought is far from over and urged people to keep conserving water. But December storms that dumped heavy snow in the mountains and partially refilled parched reservoirs have provided some relief from what had been an exceptionally dry year. Still, the state hasn’t seen a major storm yet this month, and most state reservoirs remain below their historic averages. The U.S. Drought Monitor shows much of California...
    By Kathleen Ronayne | Associated Press SACRAMENTO — Last month’s wet winter storms led California officials on Thursday to announce they’ll release more water than initially planned from state storage to local agencies that provide water for 27 million people and vast swaths of farmland. The Department of Water Resources now plans to give water districts 15% of what they’ve requested for 2022. That’s up from last month, when the state said it would supply 0% of requested water beyond what was needed for necessities such as drinking and bathing. It was the first time ever the state issued an initial water allocation of nothing. State officials stressed California’s drought is far from over and urged people to keep conserving water. But December storms that dumped heavy snow in the mountains and partially refilled parched reservoirs have provided some relief from what had been an exceptionally dry year. Still, the state hasn’t seen a major storm yet this month, and most state reservoirs remain below their historic averages. The U.S. Drought Monitor shows much of California remains...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — Last month’s wet winter storms led California officials on Thursday to announce they’ll release more water than initially planned from state storage to local agencies that provide water for 27 million people and vast swaths of farmland. The Department of Water Resources now plans to give water districts 15% of what they’ve requested for 2022. That’s up from last month, when the state said it would supply 0% of requested water beyond what was needed for necessities such as drinking and bathing. It was the first time ever the state issued an initial water allocation of nothing. READ MORE: COVID Cases In San Francisco Dropping Steadily Following Omicron PeakState officials stressed California’s drought is far from over and urged people to keep conserving water. But December storms that dumped heavy snow in the mountains and partially refilled parched reservoirs have provided some relief from what had been an exceptionally dry year. Still, the state hasn’t seen a major storm yet this month, and most state reservoirs remain below their historic averages. The U.S. Drought Monitor shows much of California remains in...
    MARYSVILLE (KOVR / CBS SF) — A Northern California water agency wants to take a big step toward helping counties in danger of going dry. The Yuba Water Agency could sell and ship billions of gallons of water to Marin County through a pipeline across the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge. There’s no official price tag for the project but the Marin Independent Journal estimates it could be more than $10 million. Under the transfer agreement, the Yuba Water Agency would sell at least 10,000 acre-feet of water to the Contra Costa Water District and East Bay Municipal Utility District from its new Bullards Bar Reservoir. The move would help make up for shortages in those districts as the drought continues. READ MORE AT CBS SACRAMENTO: Yuba County Could Ship Billions Of Gallons Of Water to Bay Area Boards for the agency and two districts have to vote and finalize the terms of the agreement, which could push them into early next year. The state also has to approve the transfer.
    by Max Darrow SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX 5) — There are now two districts in the Bay Area with tough drought restrictions in place. San Jose Water and Marin Municipal Water District customers have a choice: cut back on their water usage, or pay up. READ MORE: Smash-And-Grab Thieves Hit San Jose Eastridge Mall Jewelry Store; 5 SoughtKPIX 5 checked in with several of the water providers throughout the Bay Area to see if they plan on imposing tougher water restrictions as the drought continues. The Contra Costa Water District supplies around 500,000 customers in Contra Costa County. The CCWD is not proposing additional restrictions at this time, according to a spokesperson. The Mid-Peninsula Water District supplies around 28,000 customers in Belmont and unincorporated parts of San Mateo County. A spokesperson provided KPIX 5 with the following statement: “The MPWD initiated early water conservation messaging with its customers beginning in January this year requesting 10% voluntary reduction.  To align with the Governor’s call for 15% voluntary reduction in mid-July, we promptly shifted the MPWD’s program and conservation messaging to 15%.  To...
    McALLEN, Texas (AP) — On a scorching afternoon in South Texas, Sonia Lambert looked out at an open-air canal that carries mud-green water from the Rio Grande to nearby towns and farmland, losing much of it to evaporation and seepage along the way. “That will be someone else’s problem,” Lambert said, referring to her upcoming retirement as head of an irrigation district near the U.S.-Mexico border. In the Rio Grande Valley, a canal system designed more than a century ago for agriculture still delivers water to the region’s lush farmland and fast-growing towns and cities. Today, the canals lose as much as 40% of the water they carry, waste that experts say could contribute to steep water shortages in coming decades as the population grows and climate change intensifies droughts. “As this region continues to become drier due to climate change, water supplies will be greatly reduced,” said Guy Fipps, a professor of irrigation engineering at Texas A&M University who has studied the water system since 1998. State water officials predict that over the next 50 years, demand...
    MADRAS, Ore. (AP) — Phil Fine stands in a parched field and watches a harvester gnaw through his carrot seed crop, spitting clouds of dust in its wake. Cracked dirt lines empty irrigation canals, and dust devils and tumbleweeds punctuate a landscape in shades of brown. Across an invisible line separating Fine’s irrigation district from the next, it’s another world. Automated sprinklers hiss as they douse crops, cattle munch on green grass and water bubbles through verdant farmland. In this swath of central Oregon, where six irrigation districts rely on the Deschutes River, the consequences of the strict hierarchy dictated by the American West’s arcane water law — “first in time, first in right” — are written on the land. As drought ravages the West, the districts with century-old water claims are first in line for the scarce resource while others nearby with more recent claims have already run out. “It’s like the Wizard of Oz. … It’s shocking the difference,” said Matt Lisignoli, a farmer who got nearly five times more water on his land in one irrigation district...
    In this article DALWater flows in an irrigation ditch next to a farm in Modesto, California.Mario Tama | Getty ImagesSan Francisco and a group of Central Valley irrigation districts are suing the state of California for implementing drought restrictions that have blocked thousands of landowners and agricultural suppliers from removing water from rivers and creeks. The city and a coalition of water agencies filed the lawsuit in Fresno County Superior Court. The suit argues that the California State Water Resources Control Board doesn't have the legal authority to require senior water holders, including farmers and agricultural suppliers, to cease diverting water, even during a drought. The fight comes as California grapples with a record-breaking drought that has depleted reservoir levels and threatened water supplies. The U.S. Drought Monitor shows that more than 93% of the state is currently experiencing Severe to Exceptional Drought, and conditions are growing worse as the climate changes. Similar fights could play out across the southwestern U.S. in coming years as water shortages mount. For instance, earlier this year, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announced plans to...
    DENVER (CBS4)– The preliminary map to redraw Colorado’s state legislative districts is already re-shaping next year’s election. The map pits 20 incumbent state lawmakers against each other, including State Representatives Julie McCluskie and Dylan Roberts. Roberts announced Tuesday that he is running for a state Senate seat, previously held by term-limited Kerry Donavan, instead. Roberts is maybe best known for his efforts to lower the cost of health care in Colorado. He was the lead sponsor of a law to create the Colorado Health Insurance Option, which aims to lower premiums by 15 percent, as well as a law that caps the price of insulin. READ MORE: Nearly 148,000 Coloradans Missed Second Dose Of COVID Vaccine As a state Senator, he says he would continue his work on health care, affordable housing and water issues, “Protecting our water future is so important for our state and we are facing some pretty dire consequences if we don’t take more bold action to manage our water resources conserve our water and make sure the farmers and ranchers and agriculture are...
    The drought is here, and agriculture is scrambling. Water regulators have cut the amount that can be taken from lakes, rivers and streams. Farmers who ordinarily get that water either have to forgo planting some of their fields, or pump water from the ground, or a combination of the two. Farmers dependent on wells are also affected. The soil gets drier and drier, and more and more water has to be pumped to keep crops alive. Neither the state nor the federal water projects are delivering water for agriculture from Northern California to south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Some water is flowing through the delta for the health and safety of city dwellers, but that’s it. Some San Joaquin farms are getting water that was already in the reservoirs down there, and there have been some water transfers from north state water districts. But even with most north state water staying up here, there have still been cutbacks. In some cases the cuts haven’t been as severe, as some local irrigation districts have very old and very strong water...
    WORCESTER (CBS) – With temperatures expected to continue soaring across New England early this week, some schools in Massachusetts are opting to release students early. Read: Heat Advisory In Effect Amid Scorching Temperatures Across New England Worcester Public Schools announced Sunday that due to temperatures expected to be in the mid-90s and COVID protocol that does not allow the use of water fountains, students will be released three hours early Monday and Tuesday. Students will receive their lunch at school and water will be provided to all students. Parents are also urged to send their children with additional water. Wilmington Public Schools said that it is “best to avoid the peak temperatures in the afternoon hours when many of our classrooms will easily reach exceed a 100 degrees.” As a result, Wilmington schools will operate on an early release schedule Monday and Tuesday. Massachusetts is in the midst of what will likely be classified as a heat wave, though temperatures are expected to cool on Wednesday.
    Marin’s two major water suppliers have approved mandatory use restrictions, becoming the first large utilities in the Bay Area to do so in response to historically low rainfall. The governing boards of the Marin Municipal Water District and the North Marin Water District both adopted the drought restrictions on Tuesday evening. The rules came a day before Gov. Gavin Newsom directed state agencies to begin bolstering drought responses. He also declared a drought emergency for the Russian River watershed in Sonoma and Mendocino counties. The Russian River supplies 75% of the North Marin Water District’s supply and 25% of the Marin Municipal Water District’s supply. “California is facing the familiar reality of drought conditions, and we know the importance of acting early to anticipate and mitigate the most severe impacts where possible,” Newsom said at a news conference in Mendocino County on Wednesday. The Marin Municipal Water District rules ban a variety of activities, including washing vehicles at home, washing sidewalks and driveways, power washing, watering public medians and refilling decorative fountains. The district board also considered limiting all outdoor...
    FARMINGDALE, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — Some Long Island water districts claim they were unable to meet new drinking water standards in part due to COVID. Shipments of crucial carbon filtration systems were delayed, but environmental groups argue there are no excuses when it comes to public health. READ MORE: Expert: Working From Home May Not End When Pandemic Does, Expect Hybrid Models To Be Common New York State adopted tough new drinking water standards one year ago. An investigation into compliance launched this year by Citizens Campaign for the Environment revealed that 21, almost half, Long Island water districts were granted two-year deferrals in clearing wells of contaminants. The nonprofit calls the deferrals “a danger to the public health.” “They’re forever chemicals because they stay in your body and they don’t break down,” said Adrienne Esposito, with Citizens Campaign for the Environment. Those chemicals include: 1,4-Dioxane, a likely carcinogen found in some household cleaning products; PFOS, linked to firefighting foams, and PFOA, used in nonstick and stain resistant products. “Most of our wells are impacted by the contamination. We had no...
    (CBS4) – Poisonous “forever chemicals” have been found at levels higher than what some states say are safe in more than a dozen Colorado water districts. This, after massive statewide testing for the pollutants was conducted during the pandemic. The technical term for forever chemicals is PFAS, which stands for perfluoroalkyl substances, and they’re referred to as “forever chemicals,” because one they’re in the body, they don’t leave, and instead build up over time. According to the EPA, “exposure to PFAS can lead to adverse health outcomes in humans.” The EPA says two types of PFAS chemicals, PFOA and PFOS, can cause cancer, birth defects, and thyroid hormone disruption. PFAS can be found in a variety of common products, like clothing, cookware, and furniture. Pollution of those products can then lead to contamination of the water supply. While the EPA has no legal limit for PFAS in drinking water, it recommends the level not be any higher than 70 parts per trillion for PFOA and PFOS. But eight states say that’s not good enough, setting more stringent legal limits. Like Massachusetts,...
    NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India put many of its northern districts on high alert on Sunday after the "breaking of a part" of a Himalayan glacier, officials said, with people being evacuated due to rising water levels in a river that the glacier feeds. "The Rishiganga power project has been damaged ... causing the river's water level to rise continuously," the local police department in the state of Uttarakhand said on Twitter. "People living along the Alaknanda River are appealed to leave the area the earliest." (Reporting by Krishna N. Das; Editing by Kim Coghill and William Mallard) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: India, floods
    PLEASANTON (KPIX) – At least 500 hundred drinking water wells that serve up to 9 million Californians have potentially dangerous levels of a highly toxic family of chemicals and some of the worst are right here in the Bay Area. Surrounded by lush green fields, Pleasanton often makes the top ten list of desirable places to live. But a new list just out is nothing to boast about. “I was just floored,” said Pleasanton resident Jill Buck when she found out her town made the top ten for dangerous drinking water. Pleasanton relies heavily on groundwater for tap water but stopped using one of its wells last fall, after state-mandated testing found it contained potentially unsafe levels of two chemicals that are part of a family called per and poly fluorinated chemicals or PFAS. “It’s bioaccumulative. So it doesn’t just enter your body and flush right out. It stays. And the health impacts are great,” said Buck, who is also CEO of the Go Green initiative https://gogreeninitiative.org/ whose mission is to help schools create a culture...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — From the water fountains to the lunch lines to the bathroom sinks — school districts in our area are scrambling to test the water. KDKA investigator Meghan Schiller went to Special Pathogens Laboratory in Uptown to explain why one school district’s elevated results served as a good reminder for all of us. “In a given week, we’re testing over a thousand samples for Legionella. And those samples come from hospitals, cooling towers, industrial locations and obviously this week, schools,” said Dr. Janet Stout, president and microbiologist of Special Pathogens Laboratory. Dr. Stout leads a team known as Pittsburgh’s “Legionella experts.” She says the bacteria Legionella feeds in water and stagnant water fuels its hunger. (Photo Credit: KDKA) “Under normal circumstances, the number of Legionella in these buildings would probably be low,” she said. “But because of COVID now, and the fact that those buildings have been empty including schools, now Legionella has an opportunity to grow.” Students in Fox Chapel School District returned to the classroom Monday with bottled water in their backpacks. “It’s 2020 so there’s...
    FOX CHAPEL, Pa. (KDKA) — Students in the Fox Chapel Area School District headed back to class Monday. But for those attending in person, some extra supplies will need to be packed — and it may not be what you’re thinking. The district says they found Legionella in the water at several of its schools, including the high school. That’s why they’re asking students to bring their own water, but the school will provide water bottles too. “It’s 2020 so there’s no surprises, right?” said parent Derek Coatney. In a letter sent to parents, the district says water samples showed elevated levels at its three elementary schools and high school. “Things happen to old buildings when things like that aren’t used that often so we trust the experts,” said Coatney. School leaders say although it’s unlikely the drinking water is affected, they’re not allowing anyone to consume it and encourage students to bring their own water bottles. It’s something Derek Coatney is making sure his son does when he goes to Kindergarten tomorrow. “He’ll have a couple in his backpack...
    BRIDGTON, Maine (AP) — A pair of water districts in rural Maine areas is receiving nearly $5 million from the federal government to make upgrades. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is providing the money in the form of grants and loans to the Bridgton Water District and the Milo Water District. It's part of the $462 million the agency is using to make improvements to water and wastewater infrastructure in rural areas around the country. The Bridgton district will use the money to replace about 7,800 linear feet of existing water mains in the downtown area. The Milo district is slated to use the funds to upgrade pump stations and make other upgrades. USDA undersecretary for rural development Bette Brand said the improvements “will improve public health and drive economic development in our small towns and cities.” Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Maine
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