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    LAS VEGAS -- Las Vegas chapels of love that use Elvis Presley's likeness could find themselves becoming Heartbreak Hotels.The licensing company that controls the name and image of "The King" is ordering Sin City chapel operators to stop using Elvis in themed ceremonies, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported on Monday. Authentic Brands Group sent cease-and-desist letters in early May to multiple chapels, which are expected to be compliant by now.With Elvis so closely tied to Vegas' wedding industry, some say the move could decimate their businesses."We are a family-run business, and now we're hanging with the big dogs," said Kayla Collins, who operates LasVegasElvisWeddingChapel.com and the Little Chapel of Hearts with her husband. "That's our bread and butter. I don't get it. We were just hitting our stride again through COVID, then this happens."Clark County Clerk Lynn Goya, who led a marketing campaign promoting Las Vegas as a wedding destination, said the order for chapels to stop using Elvis couldn't have come at a worse time for the sector.The city's wedding industry generates $2 billion a year, and officials say...
    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Las Vegas chapels of love that use Elvis Presley’s likeness could find themselves becoming Heartbreak Hotels. The licensing company that controls the name and image of “The King” is ordering Sin City chapel operators to stop using Elvis in themed ceremonies, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported on Monday. Authentic Brands Group sent cease-and-desist letters in early May to multiple chapels, which are expected to be compliant by now. With Elvis so closely tied to Vegas’ wedding industry, some say the move could decimate their businesses. “We are a family-run business, and now we’re hanging with the big dogs,” said Kayla Collins, who operates LasVegasElvisWeddingChapel.com and the Little Chapel of Hearts with her husband. “That’s our bread and butter. I don’t get it. We were just hitting our stride again through COVID, then this happens.” Clark County Clerk Lynn Goya, who led a marketing campaign promoting Las Vegas as a wedding destination, said the order for chapels to stop using Elvis couldn’t have come at a worse time for the sector. The city’s wedding industry...
    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Las Vegas chapels of love that use Elvis Presley’s likeness could find themselves becoming Heartbreak Hotels. The licensing company that controls the name and image of “The King” is ordering Sin City chapel operators to stop using Elvis in themed ceremonies, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported on Monday. Authentic Brands Group sent cease-and-desist letters earlier this month to multiple chapels, saying they must comply by the end of May. With Elvis so closely tied to Vegas’ wedding industry, some say the move could decimate their businesses. “We are a family-run business, and now we’re hanging with the big dogs,” said Kayla Collins, who operates LasVegasElvisWeddingChapel.com and the Little Chapel of Hearts with her husband. “That’s our bread and butter. I don’t get it. We were just hitting our stride again through COVID, then this happens.” Clark County Clerk Lynn Goya, who led a marketing campaign promoting Las Vegas as a wedding destination, said the order for chapels to stop using Elvis couldn’t have come at a worse time for the sector. The city’s wedding industry...
    Share this: The wedding industry remains fraught with waste, but a growing contingent of brides and grooms is pushing for more sustainable changes, from the way they invite guests to the food they serve and the clothes they wear. The wedding resource The Knot estimates that more than two-thirds of about 15,000 site users did or planned to incorporate eco-conscious touches, including secondhand decor, minimizing food waste and avoiding one-time-use products. Nearly one in three said vendors should be more proactive in leading the way. Lauren Kay, executive editor of The Knot, said more venues, caterers and other vendors are taking notice.
    NEW YORK (AP) — The wedding industry remains fraught with waste, but a growing contingent of brides and grooms is pushing for more sustainable changes, from the way they invite guests to the food they serve and the clothes they wear. The wedding resource The Knot estimates that more than two-thirds of about 15,000 site users did or planned to incorporate eco-conscious touches, including secondhand decor, minimizing food waste and avoiding one-time use products. Nearly 1 in 3 said vendors should be more proactive in leading the way. After two chaotic years for the wedding industry, searches on Pinterest for thrifted weddings have tripled, and they’ve doubled for reuse wedding dress ideas, according to the site’s 2022 wedding trends report. The online resale giant Poshmark said demand for secondhand wedding dresses is at an all-time high, especially for those costing $500 or more. Lauren Kay, executive editor of The Knot, said more venues, caterers and other vendors are taking notice. “A lot of vendors are really educating themselves on ways to be more sustainable in an effort to...
    ALAMEDA, Calif. -- BFF bakers Malaka Wilson-Greene and Erica Freeman create wedding cake masterpieces adorned with fresh flowers and unique designs. Their company, "Two Chicks in the Mix" makes good-for-you desserts that are a feast for the eyes.When customers dive fork first into the aesthetic creations, they'll find wholesome ingredients, elegant flavor profiles, and thoughtfulness baked in.Besties since high school, Malaka and Eric knew they wanted to become business owners together. In fact, before opening a bakery they almost entered into a completely different industry."Erica and I started the business almost 8 years ago after I came to her with the idea that we should sell clothing," explained Malaka. "Erica pooh-poohed that idea and said that we should bake instead." The duo grew up baking with their family and decided to incorporate time-honored recipes into their California offerings. In addition to wedding cakes, Erica and Malaka craft seasonal pies, cupcakes, tarts, and more. Two Chicks in the Mix operates in LA and the Bay Area with a storefront coming to West Oakland."We don't have any formal training in the industry,...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Chanda Daniels is the creator of A Monique Affair, a wedding planning service, and Chanda Daniels Planning and Design."Every single couple's story is so different and I get to go down that road with them," Daniels said.Daniels has been creating stunning weddings since 1999, with a focus on diversity and inclusion well before "D&I" (diversity and inclusion) became the hot buzz term that it is today. If you're on the ABC7 News app, click here to watch live"I had to figure everything out on my own, and it was a tough journey to be on because there wasn't anyone that looked like me," Daniels said.In addition to the physical differences from other planners, Daniels, who is happily married to her wife, noticed that LGBTQ+ representation was virtually non-existent."After doing a little research and looking at the wedding magazines, I saw that there was no one of color and absolutely no LGBTQ+ couples," Daniels continued. "For me, that was one of my passions because I didn't want couples to have to come out to every...
    A developer accused of misappropriating up to $20 million from a failed solar project in eastern Los Angeles County allegedly pilfered more than $5 million of the taxpayer money to avoid foreclosure on a La Jolla mansion, pay off old debts to his longtime attorney and finance his daughter’s multimillion-dollar wedding in the French Riviera that featured a $360,000 performance by Italian opera singer Andrea Bocelli, according to new court filings. In September, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office charged the developer, William Barkett of La Jolla, with embezzlement, grand theft, money laundering and misappropriation of public funds. Prosecutors allege more than $8 million given to Barkett to develop the solar farm on behalf of the City of Industry was instead spent on “personal items.” Until now, there have been few details on where those funds may have gone. A new court filing by Industry, in its separate civil case against Barkett, alleges he used at least $5.3 million from the project to maintain his family’s extravagant lifestyle and to cover money he owed from other failed projects. The...
    LAS VEGAS – Sin City weddings are soaring. Couples from around the country are tying the knot even during the coronavirus pandemic. The number of marriages and marriage licenses in Las Vegas is higher now than in 2020 and in 2019, according to data from the county clerk's office.  The Little White Wedding Chapel is where some of Hollywood's most well-known have said "I do" – Britney Spears, Frank Sinatra and Bruce Willis, just to name a few. MAN SURPRISES WIFE WITH LONG-LOST WEDDING VIDEO AFTER FINDING IT 14 YEARS LATER, IN AN UNLIKELY PLACE It continued operations last year, a bit slower than usual, but now business is booming. This month is expected to be one of its busiest. "August is supposed to be very, very busy. August actually has been one of the busiest months for weddings in past experiences I’ve had," said Michael Conti, an Elvis tribute artist who performs weddings at the Little White Wedding Chapel. COUPLE LOSES 50-YEAR-OLD WEDDING ALBUM AS CAR IS HIJACKED AMID ANNIVERSARY TRIP Conti married Daniel Pinedo and Gisselle Pompa this...
    VIDEO2:2302:23The Knot Worldwide CEO on the post-Covid wedding boomSquawk on the Street Weddings, including those with larger budgets, are on the comeback after the pandemic forced widespread nuptial delays, Timothy Chi, CEO of wedding-planning website company The Knot Worldwide, told CNBC on Friday. "In the U.S., there's about 2 million weddings that happen on average annually. We saw about 50% of those happen, so that just means there's another million weddings then that got pushed forward, and we're really starting to see that come to fruition here," Chi said on "Squawk on the Street." As a result, Chi said, he expects a 20% to 25% increase in weddings this year and in 2022 compared with pre-pandemic levels. The wedding industry saw a 34% decline in revenue last year as the Covid crisis led many weddings to be postponed or at least downsized, according to a report from market research firm IBIS World. As weddings are picking back up now that most pandemic restrictions have been lifted, Chi said couples are "ready to go all out again," evidenced by their spending preferences. ...
    (CBSDFW.COM) – Ready to say “I do?” Well it seems more couples than ever are in the same boat. A nationwide wedding boom is being felt in the Dallas-Fort Worth area after a year of lockdown has resulted in couples from the past two years finally rescheduling their big day or, in some cases, having another big day. READ MORE: Irving Police Arrest Man Known As Wolf For Child Sex Abuse And Trafficking Dating Back To 1986 “For us, having two weddings was the answer,” said 2020 bride Rachel Williams. She and her fiancé got engaged in 2019, scheduled their dream wedding for June of 2020 and, like many others, met the pandemic with surprise. “We realized, it’s not going to happen, so what’s plan B?” she said. A few months later they had an intimate ceremony by Possum Kingdom lake. But now, they want the real deal. A second wedding, this time around with friends and family, will be held this Saturday a year later. Her wedding planner, Kari Loth, of Southern Bash weddings says she’s never seen the...
    (CBS4) – Under new health orders from the state, there are no longer restrictions on indoor events. The change could have huge implications for the state’s live event industry, which was essentially shutdown when the pandemic started, and has since been grappling with following strict rules. Almost a year and a half after Miles Higginbotham proposed to his girlfriend of seven years, Lucia Torres, the couple is now 15 days away from their dream wedding. They’re planning on a picturesque ceremony at a venue in Lyons, followed by an intimate indoor reception. READ MORE: Colorados Comeback: Denvers Ready Program Offers Incentives To Get Employees Back In The Office (credit: CBS) “I’m really excited and looking forward to the ceremony and the scenery too,” said Torres. Last year the couple made the tough decision to postpone their original date, rather than cut down the guest list and put people at risk. Since then, planning another wedding has been both exciting and frustrating as COVID rules changed again and again. “With COVID going on, I feel like a lot of the stresses...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — This time of year is traditionally wedding season, but you wouldn’t have known that in 2020. Many couples traded big venues for small ceremonies or even Zoom. But now relaxed rules mean the big day can be big again. READ MORE: Glitch In System Stopping Evictions Not Covered By Governors Moratorium “I think if I hadn’t been marrying the right person it would have been a lot harder,” said Paige Stoub. Stoub and Paul Frede are Chicagoland natives, current New Yorkers and newlyweds. They’re one of millions of couples who planned the big day for 2020, and it didn’t happen.  “We were having a large wedding, 250 people. It just seemed irresponsible,” she said. So the couple traded their Pilsen rooftop bash, for a very intimate ceremony on their original date last July. Their story is that of the wedding industry the last 14 months — delays, cancellations and empty venues.  “It was very difficult keeping the business going, said Cera Stan, owner of the Stan Mansion in Logan Square. Stan said she had to postpone more than 78 events....
    Teegan and Clarissa Templeton say their videographer walked out of their wedding. Courtesy of Tiffany Mccarson Clarissa and Teegan Templeton said a videographer left their wedding after learning they were a same-sex couple. The couple got their money back, but they are now calling for a more inclusive wedding industry. Tolman Media, the company that hired the videographer, says it does not stand for discrimination.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Clarissa and Teegan Templeton expected their wedding to be one of the happiest days of their lives, but instead it turned out to be a day of pain and hurt. For the past 14 months, they have both worked two jobs to afford their dream wedding on a farm in North Carolina. Along with reserving the venue, flowers, and a photographer, they also booked a videographer through Tolman Media, an international company that has branches throughout the US.  However, on their wedding day, Clarissa said the videographer walked out moments before the ceremony began because they are a same-sex couple. Now, they're fighting back. The couple says...
    Although weddings and other big celebrations are going back on the calendar in the U.S., business owners who make those events happen expect a slow recovery from the impact of COVID-19. Lauren Schaefer is getting more inquiries about her wedding coordination services now that President Joe Biden has sped up the timetable for all adults to be eligible for vaccinations. Schaefer’s company, The Get Together Events Co., does business in New York, Chicago and Nashville and has booked 60 weddings for this year, close to the 69 she did in 2019. But Schaefer still sees a lot of caution; couples whose dream is to have a big wedding aren’t sure about booking a date amid continuing restrictions on the size of gatherings in many parts of the country. Some state and local governments also have limits on wedding traditions like cocktail hours and dance floors.
    GENTLE READERS: What will the post-pandemic wedding be like? For couples who postponed getting married because of restrictions on crowds, it will presumably be that same pre-pandemic extravaganza: Three days of parties, invitations to everyone in their personal and business contact files, four-figure (as in money) dresses, bevies of attendants, stylists for hair and makeup, luxurious venues, acres of flowers, separate photographers for still shots and video, party favors, dinners complete with fancy desserts in addition to the sculptured wedding cake, disc jockeys, orchestras, dancing all night, and whatever else an imaginative and avaricious wedding industry can decree necessary. Related Articles Miss Manners: He was a lovely man, but his wardrobe malfunction made things awkward Miss Manners: She doesn’t realize the ring she wears was stolen from me Miss Manners: Our friendship ended when my database search caught her in a big lie Miss Manners: The cat’s owners were too generous with their thanks Miss Manners: My wife won’t admit her phone call was rude Miss Manners is not...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Designer Andrea Pitter’s boutique, Pantora Bridal, has tripled in size since opening in Brooklyn seven years ago as a safe space for Black women, who have been overlooked by the wedding industry. Her creations feature mesh that complement different skin tones and silhouettes that embrace all body types. She has been featured in Vogue Paris, Brides and Essence, and her designs are now carried by Kleinfeld, the world’s largest luxury bridal retailer. This year, she joined global wedding planning company The Knot as a mentor in a new program for minority wedding professionals. The Knot also created filters on its website that allows vendors to identify themselves as minority-owned, woman-owned, LGBT-owned and veteran-owned. But Pitter, a graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology, remembers a difficult and often lonely start to her career. She initially stopped attending trade shows and courting other retailers, finding that there was resistance to her as a Black designer. The lack of diversity in the wedding industry drew attention two years ago when The Knot and other wedding planning...
    BORIS Johnson hinted he could tie the knot with fiancée Carrie Symonds when lockdown is lifted. Asked if he was planning a summer wedding, the PM told The Sun: “The wedding industry is certainly gonna come roaring back in common with many other sectors of the economy.” ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 5Boris Johnson said the wedding industry will come 'roaring back' in summerCredit: Getty The sound of wedding bells came after weeks of a Downing Street turf war which has seen hostile briefings aimed at Ms Symonds. But Mr Johnson rejected claims his team were at each others throats, instead describing No10 as a “nest of singing birds”. However in a coded warning to the warring Tory tribes, the PM said the British public expect the government to be “mono-maniacally" dealing with the Covid pandemic. He said: “I think what the people of this country want and deserve - and are getting - is a government totally focused on rolling out the vaccination programme that I think most impartial observers would say has...
    Love is patient, but some people are not. The coronavirus pandemic upended the wedding industry last year, with thousands of couples across the U.S. altering their plans to the altar. According to The Knot’s Real Weddings COViD Study, which polled over 7,600 couples who initially planned to wed between March and December 2020, just 43% had a ceremony and reception last year. From there, 32% legally tied the knot and bumped their reception to a later date, while 15% postponed their celebrations altogether to 2021. According to The Knot’s Real Weddings COVID Study,  just 43% of  couples who planned to wed between March and December 2020 had a ceremony and reception last year. (iStock) Looking to the future, however, one industry insider predicts that 2021 will be a banner year for tying the knot – even though celebrations will look a little different than they used to. In honor of National Wedding Planning Day on March 1, Jeffra Trumpower, Senior Creative Director at WeddingWire, spoke with Fox News about sanity-saving tips for those planning receptions, and how to be an excellent wedding...
    BOSTON (CBS) – When Governor Baker announced the reopening of weddings on Thursday, Alicia Braga of Woburn was ecstatic. “If I didn’t get the news when I was sitting in a car, I probably would’ve been jumping up and down,” she told WBZ. Braga and her fiancé have had their Boston wedding planned since 2019, and she’s checking Governor Baker’s updates daily to see if their June 2021 date would be possible. READ MORE: Arrest Made After 80-Year-Old Shrewsbury Woman Injured In Hit & Run On Thursday, she got the news she had been waiting for, as Baker announced that starting March 22, indoor weddings of 100 people and outdoor weddings of 150 people — with a dance floor — will be allowed in Massachusetts. This reopening is a huge jump from prior restrictions and signifies the start of “Reopening Phase 4” thanks to vaccine distribution. “I can’t stop smiling,” Michael Salvati of Mike’s Music, Inc. told WBZ. “It’s amazing news. It’s huge news. We’ve been waiting for this.” READ MORE: Lowell Mayor Calls For School Committee Member To Resign...
    BORIS Johnson is set to clarify rules for weddings in 2021 when he unveils his lockdown roadmap later today. Thousands of couples forced to postpone their big days due to Covid in 2020 and with ceremonies arranged this year will be on tenterhooks to discover how their plans will be affected. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 4Couples are hoping for a return to wedding normality this yearCredit: Alamy 4Boris Johnson will announce his plans for weddings in the Commons todayCredit: PA:Press Association Under current rules, wedding ceremonies are only permitted to take place in exceptional circumstances - such as a bride or groom being terminally ill. Receptions are banned altogether under the national lockdown. Boris Johnson is set to announce the lifting of restrictions on the hospitality industry in the House of Commons at 3.30pm today. The PM is expected to reveal pubs and restaurants will be able to open for outdoor table service in April. Venues will be allowed to open their doors to allow customers indoors in May,...
    A big family wedding may be off the cards for most of us during the pandemic, but Netflix's new show is set to offer some inspiration for when we can plan extravagant nuptials again.   The Big Day takes viewers behind the scenes of the prodigal world of Indian weddings, exploring the lavish and historical traditions.  The new series follows 12 couples as they plan and put together all the details for their special celebrations. From Jaipur to New Delhi, the series shows teams of wedding planners pulling out all the stops to create the perfect day, from stunning locations, over-the-top sets and bespoke parties. 
    WOODBURY, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — Catering halls in New York that were shuttered for months and then limited to parties under 50 people are gearing up to strike up the band, so to speak. In just over a month, they’ll be allowed to host 150. But how will that work? CBS2’s Carolyn Gusoff found out on Wednesday. MORE: Recently Divorced Woman Accepting Submissions In Wedding Rings Giveaway; ‘What I’m Looking For Is A Love Story’ Two invitations and now a third in the works, that’s how many times Nicole Billone has had to reschedule her wedding due to the coronavirus pandemic. “I, obviously, just want to marry my partner at the end of the day, but it’s so expensive. You’re paying all this money and you want your dream wedding,” Billone said. She’s hoping that’s what she will get, now that the state has set March 15 as the start date of bigger weddings. COVID VACCINE New York State book online here or call 1-833-NYS-4-VAX New York City book online here or call 877-VAX-4NYC Nassau County more info here Suffolk County more info here Westchester County more info...
    In 2021, weddings may be smaller and decorated differently. Kosamtu/Getty Images Insider asked industry professionals for their insight into this year's wedding trends. Elopements and livestreamed ceremonies are expected to soar in popularity in 2021. Buffet dinners and traditional registry gifts aren't predicted to be popular in the future. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Many wedding trends of the 2010s are fading and making room for a new wave.  As couples rework their plans due to COVID-19 safety concerns and general style trends continue to change, weddings are looking a bit different in 2021.  Read on to see what wedding-industry experts have to say about which 2020 wedding trends are on their way out, and what to expect for this year's occasions.
    BEIJING (AP) — Lovebirds in China are embracing a sense of normalcy as the COVID pandemic appears to be under control in the country where it was first detected. Chen Yaxuan and Dou Di exchanged vows in front of more than 500 guests in an unmasked wedding on Dec. 12 — a day called “double twelve” and considered auspicious timing. Servers wore masks, but guests were not required to. They just had to show a green health code, showing they had only been in low-risk areas and not tested positive in the previous 14 days. A year into the pandemic, most people feel the situation is under control if not back to normal. The National Health Commission reported just 27 new cases on Dec. 28, a dramatic decrease from China’s peak. The first half of 2020 was a nightmare for the multibillion-dollar wedding industry. Many couples were forced to postpone their nuptials after large gatherings and events were banned. It wasn’t until late April that a turning point appeared. Those who had to push back their weddings helped revitalize the...
    BEIJING (AP) — Lovebirds in China are embracing a sense of normalcy as the COVID pandemic appears to be under control in the country where it was first detected. Chen Yaxuan and Dou Di exchanged vows in front of more than 500 guests in an unmasked wedding on Dec. 12 — a day called “double twelve” and considered auspicious timing. Servers wore masks, but guests were not required to. They just had to show a green health code, showing they had only been in low-risk areas and not tested positive in the previous 14 days. A year into the pandemic, most people feel the situation is under control if not back to normal. The National Health Commission reported just 27 new cases on Dec. 28, a dramatic decrease from China’s peak. The first half of 2020 was a nightmare for the multibillion-dollar wedding industry. Many couples were forced to postpone their nuptials after large gatherings and events were banned. It wasn’t until late April that a turning point appeared. Those who had to push back their weddings...
    With festivities having assumed a low key profile, Raashi Khanna doled out a perfect style to flaunt this season for the much in vogue virtual or actual presence. Raashi Khanna exemplified to us the perfect style to flaunt. A striped Raw Mango ethnic creation was paired off with a dainty choker, pulled back hair and subtle makeup. A simple but well put together style by fashion stylist Archa Mehta, Raashi endeared us with her signature panache. A Delhi girl who debuted with Shoojit Sircar’s Madras Cafe in 2013 and transitioned down South into the Telugu, Malayalam and Tamil film industry is a former advertising copywriter who dabbled into commercials before her big break. As one of the sartorial stunners of the South Indian film industry, her carefully curated styles in varied vibes with all kinds of hues, fabrics and cuts basically summarise her fabulous fashion arsenal. A minimalist lover, Raashi has figured out a fine temperament working in her favour with a balanced glam and accessories. She also happens to flaunt her love for home labels as a staple...
    In 2021, weddings may be smaller and decorated differently. Kosamtu/Getty Images Insider asked industry professionals for their insight into current and future wedding trends. Elopements and livestreamed ceremonies are expected to soar in popularity in 2021. Buffet dinners and traditional registry gifts aren't predicted to be popular in the future. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Many wedding trends of the 2010s are fading and making room for a new wave.  As couples rework their plans due to COVID-19 safety concerns and general style trends continue to change, weddings are starting to look a bit different as 2021 approaches.  Read on to see wedding industry experts have to say about which 2020 wedding trends are on their way out, and what to expect for the occasion in 2021.
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – COVID restrictions in Minnesota mean once again, organizations are scrambling to try and stay afloat. One industry taking a huge hit is the wedding industry. It’s supposed to be the day people dream of, but as of late, executing a wedding has been more of a nightmare. Lexie Albers is the founder of Availed Wedding & Event Planning in Minneapolis. “Our couples have been so in limbo this year. We are making plans and then turning around and changing them again,” she said. Typically the wedding industry is one of the steadiest, but nothing about this year has been typical, “We do typically around 30 weddings a year and this year we’ve only had nine spots  – been a crazy crazy year,” said Albers. Albers says she has great empathy for this heavy situation and is trying to improvise with some matrimonial compromise. “Whether it be elopements or micro weddings, virtual events, we are trying really hard to be really creative in how we can shift our services to fit with the current landscape of the industry,”...
    A STRUGGLING wedding venue boss whose case was discussed in the Commons has blasted the new three tier Covid rules as “a disaster”. Mandy Baker-Bird’s fears for her business were raised at Prime Minister’s Questions by Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 6Mandy Baker-Bird was left devastated by the government's new three tier lockdown rulesCredit: Richard Rayner 6Mandy owns Yorkshire Wedding Barns and fears for her businessCredit: Richard Rayner 6The wedding venue boss said there is 'nothing in the new rules' which helps herCredit: Richard Rayner She was furious when Boris Johnson expressed sympathy but failed to announce any help for the wedding industry. And she has hit out again now that the new Covid rules have left the sector – worth £14billion to the UK economy – hanging by a thread. Mandy, 55, said: “I am a Tory voter but I am furious with Boris. We are the forgotten industry – there is nothing in the new set of rules that helps us. “There’s going to be...
    Virtual weddings are gaining popularity. Jason Cox/Shutterstock; Samantha Lee/Business Insider Over one third of couples with weddings scheduled through October 2020 are considering having virtual weddings, according to Zola, a wedding planning and registry company. Since gatherings are restricted due to the pandemic, new virtual wedding services are helping couples broadcast their celebrations, and the industry is growing rapidly. Many in the industry believe virtual weddings will remain even after the pandemic — one company, LoveStream, has received inquiries for October 2021. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Rivka Holzer spent years running weddings with hundreds of guests as an events manager at a New York City catering company. That changed when the pandemic hit. "We worked as far as we could into mid-April, and then our boss had a Zoom call with us and told us that we were furloughed," she said. "There were no hard feelings there, of course, because there were no weddings." Seeing the rising popularity of livestreamed events, she began reaching out to videographers on Facebook to explore starting a virtual wedding-planning...
    Not every detail of a wedding is worth splurging on. Shutterstock Insider asked wedding-industry experts about the things couples should stop wasting money on for their big day.  Favors, photo booths, and champagne toasts are all potentially unnecessary extras.   Some professionals told Insider that elaborate invitations are oftentimes not worth the high price tag.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. It's no secret that a wedding is the most expensive party most people will ever throw.  The special day can really batter your bank account so, to get a better idea of what's not worth the splurge, Insider consulted with a range of wedding-industry experts. Read on for some things you might not want to spend money on for your wedding day, according to the pros.
    Brides, meet the secret weapon you never knew you needed – the bridesmaid for hire. If wedding bells are ringing, Jen Glantz would love to be there. The New Yorker has an extraordinary full-time gig, running a business called Bridesmaid for Hire. After launching the company in 2014, Glantz has worked hundreds of weddings all over the country and received over 50,000 applications for an elite squad of “professional” bridesmaids, stationed all over the U.S. In conversation with Fox News, the insider discussed how the coronavirus pandemic may transform the wedding industry forever, advice for couples planning nuptials during this time and the most common reasons people seek her help, plus the craziest request she’s ever gotten on the big day. (Hint – cold feet happens!) Jen Glantz, founder of Bridesmaid for Hire, has worked with over 100 different clients since launching her business in 2014. (Jen Glantz) 5 TIPS FOR DATING DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC, FROM A MATCHMAKER FOX NEWS: While 2020 has been a year unlike any other, you can’t quarantine love, and people still want to...
    Lee Hanyo and his now-wife Megan planned to have a big destination wedding in Arizona this May. Then, the novel coronavirus hit. But instead of pushing their marriage back, like many couples in their position have opted to do, the “Phase Green” Pittsburgh, PA natives decided to keep their day, but plan a new, smaller and safer wedding from scratch.  “We replanned our whole entire wedding in four weeks,” Hanyo told The Daily Beast. “We ended up getting married at her family’s cabin [in Pennsylvania.] It’s right on the river. It’s really special to her,” he said. Everything stayed true to their vision with the exception of their guest count, which ended up totaling 26 people, and the location. Yet those were the wild cards that seemed to work out in their favor—even the special mini cacti centerpieces on each table as an homage to the first wedding. “We were able to be in the moment more. It made it better for us,” he said.  As COVID-19 cases continue to rise across the country, people like Hanyo are learning...
    People who work in the wedding industry have seen couples who last and ones who don't. Shutterstock Wedding planners, officiants, and photographers notice a lot about their clients' relationships. Being secretive about costs or not spending time together after the ceremony can hint at trouble, one expert said. Some of the experts told Insider that happy couples show strong problem-solving skills on the day of their wedding and don't squabble over prices. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A couple's wedding is supposed to be one of the most joyful days of their lives — but the stress of planning the festivities can quickly expose the cracks in even the most seemingly stable relationships. Insider spoke with wedding-industry experts like photographers, planners, and ceremony officiants to pinpoint some of the most telling red flags that can hint at whether a couple will live happily ever after. Here's what these pros, who have worked with hundreds of soon-to-be newlyweds, said were the best indicators of future happiness or a looming divorce.
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