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    Each Friday, One Green Planet brings you the week’s top news. For those who don’t have a lot of time to look through the news each day, this is will be a great resource and an easy way to catch up! Here you’ll find different categories of news, a synopsis of the top stories, and links to each article published during the week. 1. Animal Rights and Welfare News Source: Vintagepix/Shutterstock As always we had a ton of news to cover in the world of animal rights and welfare. This week we saw happy and hopeful stories, as well as some grim and depressing ones. Some of the more notable stories included A New Massive Wind Farm Could Destroy Critical Habitats, New Study Reveals How Raccoons Survive in Human-Dominated Environments, Alaskan Snow Crab Season Canceled for the First Time in History Due to Over 1 Billion Crabs Mysteriously Missing, Why We Must Reject Octopus Farming Before It Begins, Horse Named Ryder Who Sparked Outrage After Collapsing in NYC in August Has Died, With Your Help, Congress Can Complete Work on FDA Modernization Act 2.0 to...
    Unfortunately, the world is not a very peaceful or safe place for many individuals. From conflict to abuse to exploitation, there is so much cruelty inflicted on both humans and animals. While this can get disheartening and difficult to hear about, petitions are a great way to use your voice for good. Just by signing one, you are a part of helping those who are not treated fairly. You can even share them with your friends and acquaintances to increase your impact. Through petitions, we can reach those in power and demand justice for others. They are valuable tools for making positive changes in the world. If you are looking for a way to help animals and humans, here are 12 petitions you should sign this week, including Ask Vietnam’s Government to Expedite the Shutdown of Bear Bile Farms, Pressure Romania’s Prime Minister to Ban Fur Farming, Demand Justice for Kitten Who Was Thrown into a Fire Pit, and More! We want to thank you for being the change you wish to see in the world and giving a...
    Unfortunately, the world is not a very peaceful or safe place for many individuals. From conflict to abuse to exploitation, there is so much cruelty inflicted on both humans and animals. While this can get disheartening and difficult to hear about, petitions are a great way to use your voice for good. Just by signing one, you are a part of helping those who are not treated fairly. You can even share them with your friends and acquaintances to increase your impact. Through petitions, we can reach those in power and demand justice for others. They are valuable tools for making positive changes in the world. If you are looking for a way to help animals and humans, here are 10 petitions you should sign this week, including Tell Romania to End Chinchilla Fur Farming, Find Person Who is Cutting Down Over 750 Trees in Oregon For No Reason, and Demand the Department of Justice Overturn Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” Law, and More! Raise awareness while making a fashion statement by wearing sustainable brands like Tiny Rescue. Check out...
    The Biden administration is investing over $2 billion to make the country’s agricultural sector more sustainable. While world leaders should be calling for an end to factory farming and asking people to reduce their consumption of animal products, the Biden administration has decided to take a different route. Source: Farm Journal/YouTube The U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced the launch of its $2.8 billion pilot program called Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities. The program will start with a pool of recipients, which includes 70 agricultural projects that promote “climate-smart” farming practices. Then, the second pool of selected projects will be announced later this year. According to the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, climate-smart agriculture is an approach to “transform agri-food systems toward green and climate-resilient practices.” These can include anything from conservative tilling and cover cropping. It can also include carbon capture and swapping out the use of wet cow manure. Wet cow manure rates a large amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Livestock and animal agriculture make up a huge amount of methane gas emissions in...
    If humankind is to one day make the interplanetary jump from Earth to Mars, then the ability to grow food will be vital. Matt Damon found a way in the 2015 blockbuster The Martian, managing to survive on potatoes during the fictional storyline.  Now that vision may may be a little closer to reality, after US scientists discovered that alfalfa plants may be the key to growing healthy vegetables on the red planet.  They found that alfalfa grows well in a volcanic soil that mimics Martian regolith, and that the alfalfa could then be turned into fertiliser to help grow turnips, radishes and even lettuce.  The researchers also used a marine bacteria to remove salt from briny water. Together, they say this shows that it is possible to use the resources on Mars to farm and grow plants and sustain human missions and permanent settlements.  Food on the Red Planet: Matt Damon found a way to grow plants on Mars in the 2015 blockbuster The Martian (pictured), managing to survive on potatoes during the fictional storyline, and now making it...
    (The Center Square) – New York Gov. Kathy Hochul went to Long Island on Monday to launch a statewide tour where she and other officials will talk directly with farmers to address their concerns about the agriculture industry. The tour started as some farmers and their supporters anxiously await a state ruling on a reduction in the overtime labor threshold that could severely impact their operations. Hochul, Lt. Gov. Antonio Delgado and state Agriculture Commissioner Richard Ball will meet with industry leaders to discuss the federal Farm Bill, which is due to be renewed by Congress next year. The governor said she has placed “a special emphasis” on agriculture as the state emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic, and the listening tours are an extension of that. She also said the state will invite U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to join in “a major summit” about making New York a national agricultural leader. “I wanted to challenge people across the state and help us define the future of farming going forward,” Hochul said. “And that’s what this...
    MAASLAND, Netherlands (AP) — Bales of hay lie burning along Dutch highways. Supermarket shelves stand empty because distribution centers are blocked by farmers. Then, at dusk, a police officer pulls his pistol and shoots at a tractor. Dutch farmers are embroiled in a summer of discontent that shows no sign of abating. Their target? Government plans to rein in emissions of nitrogen oxide and ammonia that they say threatens to wreck their agricultural way of life and put them out of business. The reduction targets could radically alter the Netherlands’ lucrative agriculture sector, which is known for its intensive farming, and may also foreshadow similar reforms — and protests — in other European nations whose farmers also pump out pollutants. That turmoil seems a long way off Friday at Jaap Zegwaard’s dairy farm, which occupies 80 hectares (200 acres) of grassland close to the port city of Rotterdam, whose chimneys and cranes form a backdrop to his fields. Most of Zegwaard’s herd of 180 cattle, mostly black and white Holstein-Friesians, graze in meadows close to a traditional Dutch...
    For any astronauts hoping to survive on the surface of the moon, growing crops will be an essential. Now, scientists have taken 'one small step' towards growing plants on the lunar surface, after showing it's possible to grow thale cress in lunar soil – albeit here on Earth.  Researchers from the University of Florida grew the plants in soil collected by NASA during the Apollo 11, 12 and 17 missions. The findings raise hopes that plants could be grown on the moon during future space missions, and even enable mankind to set up a lunar colony. 'For future, longer space missions, we may use the Moon as a hub or launching pad,' explained Professor Rob Ferl, one of the study's authors. 'It makes sense that we would want to use the soil that's already there to grow plants.' Scientists have taken 'one small step' towards growing plants on the lunar surface, after showing it's possible to grow thale cress in lunar soil Researchers from the University of Florida grew the plants in soil collected by NASA during the Apollo 11,...
    Climate laws are having a negative knock-on effect on farming as businesses outbid locals for land in hopes of generating carbon credits. The future existence of family farms in Wales is under threat as a result of Britain’s climate laws, which are seeing big businesses outbid locals for land. Companies have bought up more and more land in the British Home Nation in hopes of obtaining so-called carbon credits, which can be used to offset company emissions elsewhere. According to a report by The Telegraph, a number of companies have reportedly purchased Welsh land formerly used for farming to grow trees — at a time of rising food insecurity — with one investment firm buying up at least six former farms for the apparent purpose of afforestation. A number of MPs in Britain have now warned that the mass sales to big business could damage local communities and erode the inherited knowledge of Welsh customs and the Welsh language. “We heard that a significant amount of farming land is being lost to carbon offset projects, which is being sold at such...
    For the first time in Congressional history, the U.S. House is taking up a bill to ban a category of factory farming of animals for food or fiber. It’s an amendment, offered by Representatives Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., Nancy Mace, R-S.C., and Peter DeFazio, D-Oregon, to ban mink farming in the United States. Animal advocates concerned about the cruelty of factory farms and the frivolity of fur should take action today. The vote is imminent. Mink farming and SARS-CoV-2 SARS-CoV-2 is, by and large, a virus that affects two species: humans (Homo sapiens) and American mink (Neovison vison). Public health authorities tracking the progression of the COVID-19 virus in humans estimate 10 percent of 7.8 billion people in the world have been infected.  There has been a parallel progression of the virus in mink, with infected mink farmworkers passing the virus to captive mink on fur farms. In North America and Europe, there have been approximately six to seven million mink infected with SARS-CoV-2, with approximately 675,000 dying from the virus. That’s more than 10 percent of the global population...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — This Black History Month, Illinois’ Lieutenant Governor Juliana Stratton is on a mission to make sure minority farmers have access to all the benefits available to people in the agricultural industry. She’s traveling the state, listening to people in Illinois agriculture to put together a strategy for equality in the farming industry, as well as ways to fight food insecurity. READ MORE: Woman Killed, Security Guard Wounded In Shootout Outside Liquor Store In Bronzeville Near Chicago Public Safety Headquarters“My ancestors recognized, as we do today, that in uplifting others and ensuring access to food and other basic needs, we can create a legacy of opportunity for generations to come,” Stratton said. READ MORE: Man Charged With Hate Crimes For Vandalizing Two Synagogues, Two Jewish Schools In West Rogers ParkThose ancestors she’s talking about include her great, great grandfather and his brother. They were given a plot of land in Mississippi after they were emancipated from slavery and they developed that into a community. I'm deeply connected to #Agriculture because my own history has shown me how #AgConnectsUsAll....
    Within three decades, the San Joaquin Valley’s annual average temperature could increase by 4 degrees, worsening water quality and health hazards in the impoverished communities of California’s agricultural heartland, according to a new regional climate change report. Those hit hardest by the increasing heat will be poor farming communities that lack the resources necessary to adapt, according to the UC Merced report. That conclusion was based on dozens of recent scientific studies on a variety of issues related to climate change, and assumes a worst-case scenario for global carbon emissions. “Many families in San Joaquin Valley rely on agriculture as their main source of income,” said Jose Pablo Ortiz-Partida, a climate and water scientist for the Union of Concerned Scientists and co-author of the report. “Now, climate change is gunning for them. They need all the help they can get.” The report, part of California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment, paints a dire portrait of life in the southern Central Valley as increasing water scarcity, poverty, low air quality and rising temperatures conspire to erode health, economic opportunity and environmental...
    COUNTRYFILE has been ripped to shreds by 'p***ed off farmers' - as Jeremy Clarkson is praised for 'doing more for farming in a year'. The Grand Tour star's agricultural series, Clarkson's Farm, debuted on Amazon Prime Video earlier this year, and follow's Jeremy's attempts to run his Diddly Squat farm himself. 2Countryfile has been ripped to shreds by 'p***ed off farmers'Credit: Sam Holden 2Farmers feel like Jeremy Clarkson has done more for their industry since his Amazon Prime Video series was released earlier this yearCredit: Arthur Edwards / The Sun The eight part series documents the highs and lows of farming and the precarious nature of the job, and now author and farmer James Rebanks has praised the show for doing more for farming in one year than the BBC's Countryfile has in 30. Discussing Clarkson's Farm at the Cheltenham Literature Festival, James began: “I can report back from within the farming community. They all loved that programme. They loved it. "Okay, he’s clowning around, and he plays to that audience, and a lot of farmers are lads that...
    Share this: A new hydroponics lab and newsroom classrooms are coming to Liberation Diploma Plus High School in Coney Island, it was announced Friday by Councilmember Mark Treyger and Principal April Leong. The lab and classrooms are coming courtesy of a $455,000 grant in FY22 City Council capital funding. The school, at 2865 W.19th St., is a transfer alternative school, which admits older students who have fallen behind in credits, dropped out or need a fresh start, according to the Inside Schools website. Hydroponics is a type of horticulture that involves growing plants, usually crops, without soil by using mineral-nutrient solutions. Because hydroponic farming uses less space than conventional farming, it’s often used for indoor locations — such as a school building.
    CLARKSON'S Farm duo Jeremy Clarkson and Kaleb Cooper clashed again in another hilarious farming disagreement. Filming for the Amazon Prime show is over - but the bickering between the two hasn't. 3Duo Jeremy and Kaleb are famed for their farming disagreementsCredit: Amazon Prime 3Kaleb showcased Jeremy's handiworkCredit: Instagram Kaleb took to Instagram to show off Jeremy's broken gate. He captioned the snap: “It was all going so well until someone decided they didn’t like the gate anymore. "Wonder who that was @jeremyclarkson1.” Jeremy commented: “So annoying.” Fans joined in and pointed out it might have something to do with Jeremy’s huge Lamborghini tractor. One said: “It's the consequence when you have a Lamborghini R8 Tractor.” A second wrote: “Gerald is on the payroll for a reason. Have him give a discussion of mending the fence.” What's on Netflix, Disney+ and Amazon Prime?Looking for a new Netflix series to binge or the best movies to watch on Amazon Prime? We have you covered... New on Netflix: The best series and films released every day The best movies on...
                        Federal officials have sentenced a Stonecrest, Georgia man for defrauding the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Coronavirus Food Relief Program and attempting to defraud the IRS’s COVID-19 relief program. This, according to a press release that the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia published this week. That man, Christopher Hayes, 35, who already pleaded guilty in May, received a sentence of two years and six months in prison followed by three years of supervised release. He must also pay restitution of $248,739, the press release said. “Hayes submitted a false claim to the USDA’s Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) for the claimed loss of livestock at his commercial farming operation. CFAP provided direct relief to producers who faced price declines and additional marketing costs due to COVID-19. Hayes did not own or operate a commercial farming operation and did not have losses associated with any livestock when he made a claim under CFAP,” the press release said. “In addition, Hayes submitted a fraudulent IRS Form...
    Animal agriculture is nothing if not pervasive—not to mention invasive. Nearly half the world’s surface area is taken up by livestock systems, according to a 2011 report from the International Livestock Research Institute, and with an ever-growing human population, it’s not too far-fetched to imagine the prevalence of livestock systems may also continue to increase — but at what cost to native flora and fauna? The Dirt and Deforestation Dilemma With the alarming rates at which precious virgin forests around the world are disappearing, we need more than ever to protect the few we have left. And yet, the more farming we do, the more forests we wind up leveling to pave the way for satisfying our meat and dairy cravings. Brazil, in particular, has been a hotspot for this issue in recent years. Between 1996 and 2006, for example, the amount of Amazon land lost to cattle ranching equaled the size of Portugal, and it’s estimated that animal agriculture is responsible for 90 percent of total rainforest deforestation in the region. The problem isn’t restricted to the Amazon...
    FORMER Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson is embarking on a new journey taking sick sheep to their deaths on his show Clarkson's farm. The 61-year-old burst into tears as he became overwhelmed with emotion after he drove three ewes to an abattoir for them to be put down. 4Jeremy Clarkson has began a new show looking after his farmCredit: Amazon Prime Jeremy made the decision to end their life in the second instalment of his new show that follows his life as he embarks on being a farmer. It comes after he was told that three of his ewes would be unable to breed healthy lambs, and as he doesn't class them as pets, he was advised to have them killed. Speaking to those at the abattoir, Jeremy looked uneasy but decided to kill them regardless. Driving the animals to their death, he said: "I don’t know what to say or think about this mission this morning. 4The star made the upsetting decision to kill off three of his ewesCredit: TNI Press “I’m a sheep farmer, this is what...
    MATTITUCK, New York -- Farming is second nature for Ed Harbes - and for many Long Island families, it's second nature to head to his family farm when the weather warms up. The Harbes family has been farming on Long Island for generations, and the Mattituck business is still thriving.Their farming roots trace back to Europe, with the family continuing the tradition in the Hempstead area in the 1920s before moving out to Mattituck in 1968.Even though his father did not push him into the family business, Harbes wanted to give farming a try anyway after marrying the love of his life, Monica.The farm's appeal lies in the escape it offers from the fast pace of life, explained Monica Harbes, and farms like the one she runs are increasingly rare."Let's face it, there are not too many farms in our country anymore," she said.Related: Tiptoe through a rainbow of half a million tulips at this Long Island farmTheir 200-acre farm features something to do for kids of all ages, and that's part of what attracted visitor Trudi Ishmael."We needed a...
    COUNTRYFILE viewers have furiously accused the show of trying to "brainwash" its fans by putting the spotlight on "modern technology" farming techniques. Angry followers of the BBC One show claimed it was wrong to share a snippet into the Liburn family's 100-year-old dairy farming business, which has adopted "high tech" practises. 8Countryfile viewers have accused the BBC of trying to 'brainwash' its audienceCredit: BBC They too particular umbrage to the family, who run Brookvale Farm in Northern Ireland, choosing to keep their mammals inside and feeding them hay, not grass. Current owners Pamela and Richard spoke candidly about modernising their farm and the struggle of the recent coronavirus pandemic, with Pamela stating: "There is so much technology out there, that you have to pick the best and that will work best with you. Richard added: "And what we can get our hands on," before his partner quipped: "And what we can afford." Yet this did not wash with some loyal Countryfile fans watching the scenes play out. 8Some viewers were irked at the 'high tech' practises at Brookvale Farm in...
    HAMSHIRE, TX -- Crawfish, mudbugs, crawdaddys; no matter what you call them, they're downright delicious. Whether you're ordering them by the pound at a local restaurant, or pulling them from the cooler at a friend's crawfish boil, those sweet spicy tails are a fan favorite this time of year. Even though many call them "crawfish" - they don't come from the sea. They're a freshwater crustacean according to Alan Gaulding, co-owner of the Southeast Texas Crawfish Farm. His family has owned the farm for 70 years, which also harvests rice across hundreds of acres on their Hamshire, TX property, located between Beaumont and Houston.By using shallow water paddle boats, they're able to trap and collect live crawfish from the flooded rice fields. The season really begins to ramp up in March because the mudbug's size becomes more desirable to consumers. Early in the season they're able to collect a few hundred pounds a day, but as temperatures warm up, there will be times where they can collect near one thousand pounds daily.Once they're collected from the fields, the crawfish are...
    Fur farming is a terribly inhumane industry that exploits animals for garments and accessories. Animals are kept in tiny cages and surrounded by feces, as well as corpses. Fur farms cause animals extreme physical harm and emotional distress. Fortunately, many countries have banned this cruel industry and hopefully, more will follow their lead. The United Kingdom banned fur farming in 2003; however, they still import fur from other countries and thereby, support the cruel animal exploitation that fur farming is responsible for. The U.K. also allows individuals to trap animals to kill them and then sell their fur. These individuals often torture their victims before killing them for their fur. Source: Hunt Investigation Team One of the people who shamelessly partakes in the cruel fur-trapping industry is David Sneade. He has been filmed hitting foxes with a baseball bat and crushing them beneath his boot before finally killing them. Sign this petition to demand that Parliament end all fur trapping in the U.K. No animal should ever be treated like this! To continue speaking up, sign these other petitions...
    Support is surging for the family of a North Jersey teen killed in a tragic farming accident. Brian S. Kardos, Jr., 16, died Friday March 12 in a work accident in Wantage, his obituary says. Born in Newton, Kardos had attended Sussex-Wantage schools and the Sussex County Charter School for Technology before entering the diesel program at Sussex County Technical School, where he was in his junior year. Kardos was also a member of the Sussex Tech Archery Club, the North Jersey Antique Engine and Machine Club. He recently shaved his head to support the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, his memorial says. Above all, Kardos loved working with his John Deere 112 as well as other outdoor activities like camping, fishing and hunting, his obit says. More than $24,000 had been raised on a GoFundMe for Kardos’ family as of Monday morning. “Brian had a huge heart and was always willing to lend a helping hand to anyone who crossed his path,” his memorial says. “He was loved by all and has certainly left a hand print on everyone’s heart with his...
    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson received a letter earlier this week advocating for the ban of fur sales throughout the United Kingdom. Signed by Ricky Gervais, Leona Lewis, and 50 other celebrities and influential figures, the letter builds on 2020 polling that 72% of British citizens would support a full ban on fur sales, and 93% say they oppose the fur trade at its core. This comes after several outbreaks of COVID-19 on mink farms throughout Europe, and an increased public awareness surrounding the suffering and cruelty that mink, foxes, rabbits, and other animals endure on fur farms.  “Britain prides itself on being a nation of animal lovers, and that’s why we banned fur farming two decades ago – because it is unspeakably cruel and utterly devoid of respect for animals,” the letter begins. “Subjecting foxes, mink, raccoon dogs and other animals to the endless monotony of life in a tiny, barren metal cage, only to be gassed or electrocuted to death for frivolous fashion, is totally unacceptable. Subjecting coyotes and other wild animals to the agony and prolonged distress...
    U.S. lawmakers say Trump appointees interfered with COVID-19 testing guidance GOP Rep. Ron Wright dies after Covid battle Olivia Newton-John, Daughter Chloe Lattanzi Talk New Single, Cannabis Farming and Playing Music for Plants Olivia Newton John & Chloe Lattanzi Olivia Newton-John had no plans to sing again until she heard from a woman she met at a health clinic years ago. “I didn’t know her very well, and out of the blue she sends me an email saying, ‘I just know that you need to record this song. My cousin wrote it.’ I immediately panicked,” she tells The Hollywood Reporter. “Then my husband [John Easterling] and I listened to it and I felt very emotional. It was a beautiful message.” $100 Bonus Offer for Todays Best Checking Account Get Started Ad MSN Money Instead of recording it solo, Newton-John drafted daughter Chloe Lattanzi to duet on “Window in the Wall,” a song about unity, compassion and love. Shortly after its debut, the two, who had previously collaborated on “You Have to Believe,” a remake of “Magic” from Xanadu, jumped...
    A naked yoga teacher has revealed how she has ditched Britain to live with her chocolate-farming toyboy lover despite only knowing him for ten days. Caroline Knight, 33, is now living in the Amazon jungle 70 miles from civilisation with no running water.  But despite the jungle heat, ravenous insects and back-breaking toil trying to get their plantation up and running, she has said that life could not be sweeter after falling head over heels for 19-year-old Peruvian cacao farmer Rómulo Elier Huaman Roque. Caroline, originally from Oxford, had been making a living running naked yoga classes and providing massage therapy in London's trendy Stoke Newington - but escaped the UK for Peru before the first lockdown was announced. Caroline Knight, 33, (pictured) has ditched Britain to live in the Amazon jungle 70 miles from civilisation with no running water Caroline had jetted to South America in March 2020 to spend 10 days teaching yoga on the Hoja Nueva retreat near Puerto Maldonado after an invite from a friend. She RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    Tractor accidents, grain entrapment and injuries from ornery livestock are just some of the dangers agricultural workers face every day. In fact, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health says agriculture is one of the most hazardous industries in the United States. In 2016, the agricultural industry had a rate of 21.4 deaths per 100,000 workers, and each day agricultural workers experienced 100 non-fatal, lost-work-time injuries. Agricultural dangers are not limited to North America. In Ireland, farm accidents have increased by 13 percent in the last five years and by 31 percent in the last decade, according to a national survey of farm accidents conducted by the Teagasc National Farm Survey. Furthermore, 97 percent of all farm accident victims required medical treatment. Farms are dangerous places, and while carelessness can and does contribute to many incidents, accidents also take place during routine, seemingly safe activities. These farm safety guidelines can help lower the risk of injuries. Know farm equipment. Read and follow all instructions in the equipment operation manuals. In addition, attend local farm safety workshops to...
    The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) reported that a challenge to California’s Proposition 12 has failed. Proposition 12 is the world’s strongest animal protection law. Source: ABC10/Youtube A judge upheld the initiative that prevents hen confinement, baby pigs in cages and prevents the sale of animals raised in the cages within California. The North American Meat Institute and National Pork Producers Council have both fought the law. In this instance, the North American Meat Institute brought the suit against the law. Proposition 12 went into effect in November 2018 and animal rights activists are fighting to keep it as law. “California voters have sent a loud and clear message that they reject cruel cage confinement in the meat and egg industries.” said Kitty Block, acting resident and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, said in November 2018 after the law passed. “Thanks to the dedication of thousands of volunteers and coalition partners who made this victory happen, millions of veal calves, mother pigs and egg-laying hens will never know the misery of being locked in...
    There’s no major environmental benefit to eating organic meat, a new study suggests.  Meat production, whether it’s organic or not, has a similar cost when it comes to climate damage and total costs, new research from the Technical University of Munich published in the journal Nature Communications suggests.  A new study suggests that farming organic meat is just as harmful to the environment as conventional meat. (iStock).  "We expected organic farming to score better for animal-based products but, for greenhouse gas emissions, it actually doesn’t make much difference," Maximilian Pieper of the Technical University of Munich, lead study author, said according to The Guardian. 10 BUY ORGANIC ONLY FRUITS AND VEGETABLES TO RETHINK  Researchers analyzed greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of farming different foods and calculated the cost needed to make up for the damage done to the climate. The study found conventional and organic production for beef and lamb was relatively the same and that organic chicken was reported to be worse for the climate. Producing organic pork, meanwhile, was slightly better for the environment than nonorganic. ...
    Farming groups, long hostile to policies that curb emissions, are seeking a spot at the table, rather than be on the menu, as President-elect Joe Biden eyes deep greenhouse gas cuts across the economy. Last month, for the first time, major farm lobbying groups in Washington, D.C., including the largely Republican and fierce regulation opponent American Farm Bureau Federation, joined with environmental groups, forestry groups, and state agriculture officials to unveil recommendations for policies to combat climate change. The coalition dubbed itself the Food and Agriculture Climate Alliance. Members of groups who helped develop the recommendations, led by the Farm Bureau, the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives, the National Farmers Union, and the Environmental Defense Fund, said they’ve already briefed Biden’s Agriculture Department transition team. Climate has been “something that’s been feared, in some cases just flat-out opposed, by American agriculture, and we just felt like we’ve crossed over a threshold where we need to be a participant at the table for positive things,” said Chuck Conner, president of the National Council of Farmer Cooperatives and a co-chairman of...
    According to the ruling by a federal court, a jury was correct in holding Smithfield Farms responsible for causing a nuisance in a local community around its pig farms. Neighbors of the 15,000 pigs owned by Smithfield alleged that their lives were unbearable due to the stench, loud noises, and flies that were part of the neighborhood. Elsie Herring told North Carolina Health News she was “thrilled” by the decision and has been fighting the company since the 1990s. “It’s been long overdue … and is a glimmer of hope that maybe this is the road that will bring about some sustainable change that makes living in our homes enjoyable again, which is how it should be,” Herring said. “Your home is your castle.” Judge James Harvie Wilkinson III wrote that “animal welfare and human welfare, far from advancing at cross-purposes, are actually integrally connected,” in his opinion. Later, he noted, “It is well-established — almost to the point of judicial notice — that environmental harms are visited disproportionately upon the dispossessed—here on minority populations and poor communities.” And...
    Vertical farming could increase the yields of some fruit and vegetables – Heathcliff O’Malley Think of English farming and you may imagine rolling hills stretched out as far as the eye can see.  But farms of the future could take up as little space as possible, freeing up land to plant new forests and rewild, according to a vision of the post-Brexit shakeup outlined by the environment secretary.   George Eustice said “the future of agriculture” would see the intensification of farming in some areas using environmentally friendly technologies.  Among them would be vertical farming, in which fruit and vegetables are grown indoors stacked in layers, in precisely controlled environments without soil and pesticides, using a fraction of the space and water “That enables you to actually release the land to do some of that woodland creation and replanting, which is going to be important if we’re to hit our carbon targets,” Mr Eustice told the Oxford Farming Conference. The Government will phase out £1.8bn of annual direct subsidies paid to farmers in England over the next seven years...
    farming changes English farmers could be paid for producing free-range eggs or grass-fed beef under post-Brexit changes to agricultural subsidies, the Government will announce today.  Higher welfare English food could also be labelled in shops to give consumers greater choice, amid concerns over import standards in post-Brexit trade deals.  English farmers will also ultimately have higher legal standards for the food they produce, in a move that could increase concerns about global competitiveness.  Reforms to the £3bn subsidies for farmers under the much-maligned EU Common Agricultural Policy are a cornerstone of the Government’s post-Brexit plans.  Where the CAP was blamed for encouraging inefficiencies and practices that were bad for the environment, the new scheme will see farmers paid for producing “public goods”, including clean air and water, and reductions in carbon emissions.  Overhauling the system marks the biggest shift in the way the English countryside is managed in 50 years, and will mean changes to the way every farmer operates. The vision sees unproductive land redirected to activities like tree planting, peatland restoration and bringing back declining species, while...
    The owner of a single-family Ohio home received $7.2 million in federal loans and grants intended for agricultural businesses decimated by the COVID-19 pandemic — but no signs of farming activity can be found at the residence, according to a report. Zaur Kalantarli, who immigrated to the US from Azerbaijan in 2015, owns the home in Euclid, where 20 companies with names such as Organic Ohio Berries LLC and Garlic Farming LLC were registered, Bloomberg News reported Wednesday. Nothing is sprouting on the one-eighth-acre plot aside from trees and grass, yet the firms were among dozens that won government approval for loans and grants from the Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster program, according to state and federal records. Kalantarli and his relatives created 72 companies with farming-related names at three addresses in the Cleveland area, but there’s no indication of agricultural activity at any of them or that they were active by the Feb. 1 requirement, Bloomberg reported. At least some of the loans may need to be repaid, a lawyer for Kalantarli told the outlet this week. Cleveland...
    Unfortunately, the world is not a very peaceful or safe place for many individuals. From conflict to abuse to exploitation, there is so much cruelty inflicted on both humans and animals. While this can get disheartening and difficult to hear about, petitions are a great way to use your voice for good. Just by signing one, you are a part of helping those who are not treated fairly. You can even share them with your friends and acquaintances to increase your impact. Through petitions, we can reach those in power and demand justice for others. They are valuable tools for making positive changes in the world. If you are looking for a way to help animals and humans, here are 10 petitions you should sign this week, including End Mink Fur Farming in Denmark, Restore Protections for Tongass National Forest, and ell the EPA to Regulate Particulate Matter! We want to thank you for being the change you wish to see in the world and giving a voice to the voiceless. 1. Tell Denmark to End Mink Fur Farming...
    Jose Ramirez is a unified and undefeated junior welterweight boxing champion, but farming and agriculture helped establish his hardworking foundation.  WBC and WBO junior welterweight champion Jose Ramirez had his patience tested enduring two fight postponements, but his adolescence immersed in the farming and agriculture lifestyle helped sharpen his resolve long ago. Ramirez (25-0, 17 KOs) was originally supposed to defend his titles against Viktor Postol (31-2, 12 KOs) in February, then May, and now finally gets his crack on Saturday, Aug. 29. The pandemic has disrupted everyone’s lives. For Ramirez, 2020 has felt like purgatory. “The fight stayed in my mind,” Ramirez told FanSided. “I wasn’t able to relax. I wasn’t able to put my guard down because I was just waiting for a new date. I felt like this whole year has been a blur. All I remember from 2020 is this training.” The stress of an obstructed career has been frustrating for Ramirez, but it’s nothing that he can’t handle. The 28-year-old champion forged his work ethic under the hot sun of California’s San Joaquin Valley during his youth. Ramirez...
    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — The West Virginia Department of Agriculture is continuing its live webinars on agricultural subjects next week. The webinars are called the Homesteading Series and allow an opportunity for industry experts and local producers to share knowledge. The webinars are recorded and can be viewed on the agency's YouTube channel. Webinars in June and July covered backyard chickens, canning, preservation and freezing, small fruit production, goat herding, West Virginia dairy farming, farm tool use and maintenance and forest farming. August topics will cover culinary and medical herbs, fresh cut flowers, pasture pork and processing and consumer impact of West Virginia-grown products. Links to participate will be provided on the agency's website and social media. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: West Virginia
    Fur farming is a terribly humane industry that exploits animals for garments and accessories. Animals are kept in tiny cages and surrounded by feces, as well as corpses. Fur farms cause animals extreme physical harm and emotional distress. Fortunately, many countries have banned this cruel industry and hopefully, more will follow their lead. The United Kingdom banned fur farming in 2003; however, they still import fur from other countries and thereby, support the cruel animal exploitation that fur farming is responsible for. The U.K. also allows individuals to trap animals to kill them and then sell their fur. These individuals often torture their victims before killing them for their fur. Source: Hunt Investigation Team One of the people who shamelessly partakes in the cruel fur-trapping industry is David Sneade. He has been filmed hitting foxes with a baseball bat and crushing them beneath his boot before finally killing them. Sign this petition to demand that Parliament end all fur trapping in the U.K. No animal should ever be treated like this! https://www.thepetitionsite.com/666/323/729/he-beat-this-fox-with-a-bat-but-it-was-still-breathing-so-he-crushed-it-to-death-with-his-foot/??TAP=1732 To continue speaking up, sign these...
    Humans should eat less meat and dairy to cut the nitrogen emissions produced by farming, according to a new report from UN scientists.   The livestock sector emits around 65 trillion grams (teragrams) of nitrogen a year – equivalent to one-third of all current human-induced nitrogen emissions, they say. This figure alone exceeds the 'planetary boundary' for nitrogen – one of nine boundaries that, if crossed, could endanger humanity's future on Earth.  The bulk of agricultural nitrogen emissions comes from feed production and manure management systems to feed the cattle, rather than processing meat and dairy to make it fit for human consumption.  Global livestock supply chains have significantly altered nitrogen flows over past years, thereby threatening environmental and human health Nitrogen pollution causes global warming, acid rain and eutrophication – an increased load of nutrients to global waters, which causes an abundance of oxygen-sapping blooms and kills fish. Scientists have already warned that atmospheric nitrogen needs to be reduced to around a quarter of its current volume or risk crossing a 'deleterious or even catastrophic planetary boundary'.  However, the...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A 51-year-old woman has been sentenced to over four years in prison for an elaborate farming fraud scheme that stole nearly half a million dollars from the Minnesota Hmong community, Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman announced Wednesday. Mai Vang pleaded guilty to four counts of theft-by-swindle on June 30. According to court documents, Vang orchestrated a fraud scheme by convincing people to invest in a ginseng farm she claimed to own near Wausau, Wisconsin. Nine victims lost a total of more than $450,000, according to investigators. They say one couple who new Vang from church “gave her their life savings.” Vang had eluded arrest for two years after Hennepin County charges were filed against her in Dec. 2017. She was found in Georgia in March 2020 and brought back to Minnesota. In addition to the prison time, Vang must also pay restitution of more than $480,000 to the nine victims she defrauded.
    On a farm in north-central Indiana, Brent Bible raises 5,000 acres of corn and soybeans that go into producing ethanol fuel, food additives and seeds. In Napa Valley, California, Kristin Belair picks the best grapes from 50 acres of vineyards to create high-end cabernet sauvignon and sauvignon blanc wines. Both are part of a growing number of “carbon farmers” who are reducing planet-warming greenhouse gases by taking better care of the soil that sustains their farms. That means making changes like plowing fields less often, covering soil with composted mulch and year-round cover crops, and turning drainage ditches into rows of trees. Now Congress is considering legislation that would make these green practices eligible for a growing international carbon trading marketplace that would also reward farmers with cash. This morning, Bible is scheduled to testify at a Capitol Hill hearing before the Senate Agriculture Committee that is considering the carbon farming legislation. Introduced by Senator Mike Braun (R-Indiana) and Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-Michigan), the bill sets up the US Department of Agriculture to certify independent consultants for farms that...
    (CNN)Thirty-five years ago, with just one acre of land, a couple of seeds and a bucket of hope, one Nigerian-born scientist began his quest to trample famine on his continent. News of the drought across Africa in the early 1980s troubled Father Godfrey Nzamujo, then an expatriate priest and professor at the University of California, Irvine."People were dying of starvation. I couldn't stand it," Nzamujo told CNN.Equipped with a microbiology PhD and his faith, he travelled back to Africa in search of a solution. Father Godfrey Nzamujo, Founder and Director of Songhai, on his zero waste farm in Benin.There, he found a continent ecologically rich, diverse and capable of producing food. Read MoreHe believes drought wasn't the only reason for widespread hunger, and that sustainability had been left out of the equation. Nzamujo began devising a "zero waste" agriculture system that would not only increase food security, but also help the environment and create jobs.In 1985, he traded in his professor post for gardening gloves and started his sustainable farm "Songhai" in the West African country of Benin.What is zero...
    You’ll forgive the Bertram brothers if their Silicon Valley elevator pitch is as fast-paced as a doubles match. After all, they moved from Melbourne, Australia, to the United States to play collegiate tennis, then developed a love for engineering and robotics — and a lofty goal to meet the world’s nutritional needs. Less than a decade after arriving in California, they co-founded OnePointOne, an agricultural technology company, and Willo, their direct-to-consumer health and lifestyle brand. Their entrepreneurial “garage” is a two-story-tall indoor vertical farm in San Jose where we met up with CEO Samuel (a Santa Clara University graduate) and CTO John (Westmont College, Technical University of Munich). After checking out the technology, gawking at the hundreds of red mizuna plants carefully nurtured by growers, engineers and robots, and nibbling on just-harvested, state-of-the-art basil, it was time to ask some questions. Q: How did you two hit upon this idea for a vertical farming start-up? A: Sam: There are 1.1 billion people that began this millennium malnourished. Think about that number for a moment. Galvanized by its magnitude, John and...
    The Colorado Department of Agriculture has submitted a state hemp regulation plan for federal approval, requesting numerous tweaks to proposed United States Department of Agriculture rules around hemp sample testing and discipline for farmers whose plants go over the 0.3 percent THC limit. In a letter sent to USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue on June 16, CDA Commissioner Kate Green unveiled a list of requests and proposed rules for hemp farming in Colorado set to take effect in November 1, the same day the USDA's federal rules are finalized. If approved by the USDA, Colorado's new hemp framework would govern the 2021 farming season. "As one of the nation’s longest tenured and leading hemp producers, Colorado is an innovating force in the regulation and development of this burgeoning agricultural commodity," Greenberg writes in her letter to Perdue. "The plan provides a robust framework to advance Colorado’s thriving hemp industry while addressing the specific concerns and requirements laid out by the USDA in a manner that best works for Colorado and its hemp producers."Related StoriesHemp, CBD Industries Thankful for Less Federal InterferenceColorado...
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