This news has been received from: wtop.com

All trademarks, copyrights, videos, photos and logos are owned by respective news sources. News stories, videos and live streams are from trusted sources.

mail: [NewsMag]

STOWE, Vt. (AP) — Lt. Gov. Molly Gray and Senate President Pro Tempore Becca Balint are the leading candidates in a Democratic U.S. House primary that could make either of them the first female member of Vermont’s congressional delegation.

Gray has the backing of the centrist lane of the party, with endorsements from former Govs.

Madeline Kunin and Howard Dean. Retiring U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy donated $5,000 to her campaign and cast a ballot for her.

Balint has been endorsed by an all-star list of progressive leaders, including the state’s other U.S. senator, Bernie Sanders; Rep. Pramila Jayapal, chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus; and Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, the founders of Vermont’s famously progressive ice cream company, Ben & Jerry’s.

The winner of Tuesday’s primary is expected to cruise to victory in November in deep-blue Vermont. Despite the state’s liberal credentials built up over the last half century, the lack of turnover in the congressional delegation has made Vermont the only state in the country that has never been represented in Washington by a woman.

Leahy’s retirement after 48 years in office set the stage for the history-making moment. U.S. Rep. Peter Welch, who has been in Congress since 2007, decided to run for Leahy’s Senate seat. That opened up his House seat for Gray or Balint, who would also be the first openly gay person to represent Vermont in Congress if elected.

It’s the first open seat in the state’s three-person congressional delegation since 2006. And given Vermont’s penchant for reelecting incumbents, it’s likely that the winner of the Democratic primary will be able to hold the seat as long as she wants.

The ads on television and social media, and the flyers that are showing up in Vermonters’ mailboxes every day, remain positive, focused on what the candidates see as their qualifications. But the high stakes of the contest — and the ongoing battle between the centrist and progressive wings of the Democratic Party — have laid bare the intensity of the campaign.

During a debate Thursday, Gray called Balint out for a critical comment she made while seeking the endorsement of Vermont’s Progressive Party. Balint had denounced Gray as a “corporatist and a catastrophe for the left.”

“How can Vermonters expect that you will act any differently in Congress than you have on this campaign where you’ve launched negative attacks?” Gray said. “Isn’t that the problem that we see in Congress today?”

Balint apologized to Gray for the comment, “if you found it hurtful.” But Balint used the opportunity to note the source of many of Gray’s campaign contributions.

“I said at the time the reason why I was concerned was because of the funds that you’re raising from Washington insiders,” Balint said. “You have raised a tremendous amount of money from lobbyists in D.C. and not as much money from people back here in Vermont.”

Despite this tension, the two candidates hold similar views on most issues. Both support abortion rights and want to boost affordable housing, increase access to inexpensive child care and expand broadband internet services in rural areas.

Gray, a 38-year-old attorney, grew up on a farm in the Connecticut River town of Newbury and now lives in Burlington. She has touted her experience working as a Welch staffer in Washington, in Europe for the International Committee of the Red Cross, her time as an assistant attorney general and, for the last two years, her job as lieutenant governor.

Balint, a 54-year-old former middle school teacher from Brattleboro, first came to Vermont in 1994 to teach rock climbing and settled in the state permanently in 1997. She was first elected to the state Senate in 2014. Two years ago, she became the first woman chosen as Senate president pro tempore, which means she oversees the chamber’s legislative work and presides over the state Senate if the lieutenant governor is absent.

Disputes about the source of their donations — Vermonters versus out-of-state donors or spending by outside groups — have helped drive some of the acrimony in the race.

A number of outside groups are supporting Balint’s candidacy, including the LGBTQ Victory Fund, which has spent nearly $1 million supporting her. By law, those groups are prohibited from coordinating their efforts with the campaigns.

Before the ads started, Gray had asked Balint whether she would condemn outside spending. Balint agreed.

Now that the outside spending has started, Gray says those outside groups are interfering with the conversation she is trying to have with voters.

“All of a sudden, someone else is coming in and telling Vermonters who to hire. That’s not the Vermont way,” Gray said. “Outside groups are unelected. They’re unaccountable. They’re not representing us in Congress.”

Balint said she doesn’t think the outside spending will make a difference in the race. In any event, she said, she has no control over it.

“I feel really great about the fact that we’ve run a really excellent campaign,” Balint said. “I wish they weren’t involved because I want my team to get the full credit for everything that we have done here.”

There are four Democrats on the ballot Tuesday for U.S. House; one has dropped out and the fourth is a South Burlington physician. Three candidates are vying for the Republican nomination.

Voter Christy Hudon of Stowe said she hadn’t decided whether to vote for Balint or Gray, though she is leaning toward Gray. In one of her ads, Gray highlights the challenges she and her family have faced with her mother’s chronic health problems. Hudon said her own family is dealing with issues related to aging relatives.

“I definitely feel like she understands where people’s needs are at that time a little bit better,” Hudon said.

Voter Annie Greenfelder of Middlesex noted that there doesn’t appear to be much policy difference between Gray and Balint. She said she voted for Balint because of the endorsements she has received from environmental activists but would like to see Gray run for another office if she loses.

“We need more politicians down the pipe,” Greenfelder said.

Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

News Source: wtop.com

Tags: vermont’s congressional delegation the state’s lieutenant governor outside groups the democratic the congressional the state senate because the source including the winner in washington the winner the campaign in the state the centrist in congress in the race

Teen Mom Jenelle Evans slammed for ‘dangerous’ parenting decision during beach trip with kids

Next News:

Timeline: The Justice Department criminal inquiry into Trump taking classified documents to Mar-a-Lago

Washington (CNN)The federal criminal investigation into former President Donald Trump's potential mishandling of classified documents ramped up this week in significant and unprecedented fashion, with the FBI executing a search warrant at Trump's home at his Mar-a-Lago resort.

The Justice Department inquiry is about documents that Trump removed from the White House as his term was ending in January 2021. Earlier this year, officials from the National Archives and Records Administration, known as NARA, recovered 15 boxes of presidential documents from Mar-a-Lago. Trump's lawyers previously worked with NARA to voluntarily turn over some documents, but the Mar-a-Lago search clearly indicates a new phase of the probe. Trump has denied all wrongdoing and claims the investigation is a politically motivated sham, intended to derail his potential bid to return to the White House. Here's a timeline of the key moments from the blockbuster investigation. May 2021 Read MoreAn official from NARA contacts Trump's team after realizing that several important documents weren't handed over before Trump left the White House. In hopes of locating the missing items, NARA lawyer Gary Stern reaches out to someone who served in the White House counsel's office under Trump, who was the point of contact for recordkeeping matters. The missing documents include some of Trump's correspondence with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, as well as the map of Hurricane Dorian that Trump infamously altered with a sharpie pen.Fall 2021 NARA grows frustrated with the slow pace of document turnover after several months of conversations with the Trump team. Stern reaches out to another Trump attorney to intervene. The archivist asks about several boxes of records that were apparently taken to Mar-a-Lago during Trump's relocation to Florida. NARA still doesn't receive the White House documents they are searching for. January 2022 After months of discussions with Trump's team, NARA retrieves 15 boxes of Trump White House records from Mar-a-Lago. NARA says in a statement that some of the records it received at the end of Trump's administration were "torn up by former President Trump," and that White House officials had to tape them back together. Not all the torn-up documents were reconstructed, NARA says. February 9, 2022 News outlets, including CNN, report that NARA asked the Justice Department to investigate Trump's handling of White House records and whether he violated the Presidential Records Act and other laws related to classified information. The Presidential Records Act requires all records created by a sitting president to be turned over to the National Archives at the end of their administration.February 18, 2022NARA informs the Justice Department that some of the documents retrieved from Mar-a-Lago included classified material. NARA also tells the department that, despite being warned it was illegal, Trump tore up documents while he was president, and that senior officials in the Trump administration did not properly preserve their social media messages, draft tweets and deleted tweets. April and May 2022 On April 7, NARA publicly acknowledges for the first time that the Justice Department is involved, and news outlets report that prosecutors have launched a criminal probe into Trump's mishandling of classified documents. Around this time, FBI agents quietly interview Trump aides at Mar-a-Lago about the handling of presidential records as part of their widening investigation. May 12, 2022 News outlets report that investigators subpoenaed NARA for access to the classified documents retrieved from Mar-a-Lago. The subpoena, which is part of the process to allow investigators to take possession of the documents from the NARA, is the first public indication of the Justice Department using a grand jury in its investigation. June 3, 2022 Four investigators, including a top Justice Department counterintelligence official, visit Mar-a-Lago seeking more information about classified material that had been taken to Florida. The four investigators meet with two of Trump's attorneys, Christina Bobb and Evan Corcoran, and look around the basement room where the documents are being stored. Trump briefly stops by the meeting to say hello to the officials, but he does not answer any questions. June 8, 2022 Trump's attorneys receive a letter from federal investigators, asking them to further secure the room where documents are being stored. In response, Trump aides add a padlock to the room in the basement of Mar-a-Lago.August 8, 2022 The FBI executes a search warrant at Mar-a-Lago -- a major escalation of the classified documents investigation. The search focused on the area of the club where Trump's offices and personal quarters are located. Federal agents remove boxes of material from the property. The search was the first time in American history that a former president's home was searched as part of a criminal investigation.

    Other News

    • Hailie Deegan, Tanner Gray Partner With New Crew Chiefs
    • Jordan calls on Wray and Garland to testify following FBI raid of Mar-a-Lago
    • Search Donald Trumps home: Justice allows House of Representatives to review former US presidents tax returns
    • The next frontier in the tech battle between the US and China
    • Drivers blown away by four secret key fob functions – how many are you aware of?
    • Dan Campbell Has Cryptic Update on Lions Quarterback Battle
    • Dems rally around abortion. Are they reaching Black voters?
    • Little Peoples Tori Roloff shows baby Josiah, 3 months, laying in messy play room of $1M home with floor covered in toys
    • Two Minors Reported Missing In Separate Baltimore Cases
    • I’m a cleaning expert — 3 places you’re neglecting which are making your home stink
    • Tyson Fury’s trilogy fight with Derek Chisora eyed for December at Cardiff’s 75,000-seat Principality Stadium
    • The Flash star Ezra Miller charged with felony burglary
    • 20 Delaware Firefighters Heading To California To Help Battle McKinney Fire
    • Barcelona ‘prepare court battle with Frenkie de Jong, Pique, Ter Stegen and Lenglet as new deals set them back £263m’
    • Russian TV threatens to unleash NUKES on Britain & US after battle with Ukraine over ‘out of control’ nuclear mega-plant
    • Issey Miyake dead – Revolutionary Japanese fashion designer dies aged 84 after cancer battle
    • Inside Grease tragedies from Olivia Newton-John’s cancer battle to sudden deaths of cast members and one star’s arrest
    • National News | Ezra Miller charged with felony burglary in Vermont
    • Ezra Miller charged with burglary, allegedly stole alcohol in Vermont